Civil War Congressional Medal of Honor Recipients

Civil War Congressional Medal of Honor Recipients

TOPIC

MARINE CORPS.

    The Medal of Honor, established by joint resolution of Congress, 12 July 1862 (amended by Act of 9 July 1918 and Act of 25 July 1963) is awarded in the name of Congress to a person who, while a member of the Armed Services, distinguishes himself conspicuously by gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty while engaged in an action against any enemy of The United States; while engaged in military operations involving conflict with an opposing foreign force; or while serving with friendly foreign forces engaged in an armed conflict against an opposing armed force in which The United States is not a belligerent party. The deed performed must have been one of personal bravery or self-sacrifice so conspicuous as to clearly distinguish the individual above his comrades and must have involved risk of life. Incontestable proof of the performance of service is exacted and each recommendation for award of this decoration is considered on the standard of extraordinary merit.

    The President of the United States in the name of The Congress takes pleasure in presenting the Medal of Honor to

    SGT. RICHARD BINDER

      Rank and Organization: Sergeant, U.S. Marine Corps. Born: 1840, Philadelphia, Pa. Accredited to: Pennsylvania.

      CITATION:

      On board the U.S.S. Ticonderoga during the attacks on Fort Fisher, 24 and 25 December 1864, and 13 to 15 January 1865. Despite heavy return fire by the enemy and the explosion of the 100-pounder Parrott rifle which killed 8 men and wounded 12 more, Sgt. Binder, as captain of a gun, performed his duties with skill and courage during the first 2 days of battle. As his ship again took position on the 13th, he remained steadfast as the Ticonderoga maintained a well-placed fire upon the batteries on shore, and thereafter, as she materially lessened the power of guns on the mound which had been turned upon our assaulting columns. During this action the flag was planted on one of the strongest fortifications possessed by the rebels.

      Civil War Congressional Medal of Honor recipient. Served as a Sergeant in the United States Marine Corps on board the "USS Ticonderoga". He was awarded the CMOH for his heroism during the Union Army-Navy assault and capture of Fort Fisher, North Carolina on January 13 to 15, 1865. His citation reads "Despite heavy return fire by the enemy and the explosion of the 100-pound Parrott rifle which killed 8 men and wounded 12 more, Sgt. Binder, as captain of a gun, performed his duties with skill and courage during the first 2 days of battle. As his ship again took position on the 13th, he remained steadfast as the Ticonderoga maintained a well-placed fire upon the batteries on shore, and thereafter, as she materially lessened the power of guns on the mound which had been turned upon our assaulting columns. During this action the flag was planted on one of the strongest fortifications possessed by the rebels." His Medal was awarded to him on June 22, 1865. He was one of nine USS Ticonderoga crewmembers to be awarded the CMOH for their bravery during the Civil War (the others being Quartermaster Edward R. Bowman, Boatswain’s Mate William Campbell, Marine Sergeant Isaac N. Fry, Coxswain Thomas Jones, Captain of the Main Top George Prance, Coxswain William Shipman, Chief Quartermaster Robert Sommers, and Captain of the Forecastle William G. Taylor.  (bio by: Russ Dodge)

      SGT. JOHN HENRY DENIG

        Rank and Organization: Sergeant, U.S. Marine Corps. Born: 1839, York, Pa. Accredited To: Pennsylvania. G.O. No.: 45, 31 December 1864.

        CITATION;

        On board the U.S.S. Brooklyn during action against rebel forts and gunboats and with the ram Tennessee, in Mobile Bay, 5 August 1864. Despite severe damage to his ship and the loss of several men on board as enemy fire raked her decks, Sgt. Denig fought his gun with skill and courage throughout the furious 2-hour battle which resulted in the surrender of the rebel ram Tennessee and in the damaging and destruction of batteries at Fort Morgan.

        Birth: Sep. 8, 1838

        Death:  Dec. 10, 1876

        Buried: Prospect Hill Cemetery
        York
        York County
        Pennsylvania, USA
        Plot: Section K, Lot 17

        SGT. ISAAC N. FRY

          Rank and Organization: Orderly Sergeant, U.S. Marine Corps. Accredited To: Pennsylvania. G.O. No.: 59, 22 June 1865.

          CITATION:

          On board the U.S.S. Ticonderoga during attacks on Fort Fisher, 13 to 15 January 1865. As orderly sergeant of marine guard, and captain of a gun, Orderly Sgt. Fry performed his duties with skill and courage as the Ticonderoga maintained a well-placed fire upon the batteries to the left of the palisades during the initial phases of the 3-day battle, and thereafter, as she considerably lessened the firing power of guns on the mount which had been turned upon our assaulting columns. During this action the flag was planted on one of the strongest fortifications possessed by the rebels.

          Birth: Feb., 1839
          Ephrata
          Lancaster County
          Pennsylvania, USA

          Death:  1900
          Garretson
          Minnehaha County
          South Dakota

          Buried: Summit Hill Cemetery
          Garretson
          Minnehaha County
          South Dakota

          SGT. MICHAEL HUDSON

            Rank and Organization: Sergeant, U.S. Marine Corps. Born: 1834, Sligo County, Ireland. Accredited To: New York. G.O. No.: 45, 31 December 1864.

            CITATION:

            On board the U.S.S. Brooklyn during action against rebel forts and gunboats and with the ram Tennessee in Mobile Bay, 5 August 1864. Despite severe damage to his ship and the loss of several men on board as enemy fire raked the decks, Sgt. Hudson fought his gun with skill and courage throughout the furious 2-hour battle which resulted in the surrender of the rebel ram Tennessee.

            Birth: 1834

            Death:  1891

            Burial: Maple Hill Cemetery
            Charlotte
            Eaton County
            Michigan

            CORP. JOHN FREEMAN MACKIE

              Rank and Organization: Corporal, U.S. Marine Corps. Born: 1836, New York, N.Y. Accredited To: New York. G.O. No.: 17, 10 July 1863.

              CITATION:

              On board the U.S.S. Galena in the attack on Fort Darling at Drewry's Bluff, James River, on 15 May 1862. As enemy shellfire raked the deck of his ship, Corporal Mackie fearlessly maintained his musket fire against the rifle pits along the shore and, when ordered to fill vacancies at guns caused by men wounded and killed in action, manned the weapon with skill and courage.

              Birth: 1836

              Death:  1910

              Buried: Arlington Cemetery
              Drexel Hill
              Delaware County
              Pennsylvania, USA
              Plot: Melrose Section, Lot 606, Grave 2

              Civil War Congressional Medal of Honor Recipient. Served as a Corporal in the United States Marine Corps, enlisting on August 23, 1861. He was awarded the CMOH for his bravery in the Naval Assault on Drewry's Bluff, Virginia, on May 15, 1862. His citation reads "On board the U.S.S. Galena in the attack on Fort Darling at Drewry's Bluff, James River, on 15 May 1862. As enemy shellfire raked the deck of his ship, Corporal Mackie fearlessly maintained his musket fire against the rifle pits along the shore and, when ordered to fill vacancies at guns caused by men wounded and killed in action, manned the weapons with skill and courage". When his Medal was issued to him on July 10, 1863 he became the first member of the Marine Corps to be awarded the Medal of Honor. However, since he was on active duty at the time (serving in Sabine Pass in Texas on board the USS Seminole), his Medal came to him via the Postal Service. He served until his honorable discharge in August 24, 1865, having served four full years in the Corps. Today a Marker stands near the spot in the Richmond National Battlefield Park where Corporal Mackie performed his brave act. (bio by: Russ Dodge)

              ADDITIONAL INFORMATION:

              <a>Born in New York, NY. Cpl Mackie enlisted in the Federal Marine Corps on Aug. 23 1861.</a>

              <a>He was the first Marine to be awarded the Navy issue Medal of Honor. His citation reads:  "On board the USS Galena in the attack on Fort Darling at Drewry's Bluff, James river, on May 15, 1862. As enemy shellfire raked the deck of his ship, Corporal Mackie fearlessly maintained his musket fire against the rifle pits along shore and, when ordered to fill vacancies at guns caused by men wounded and killed in action manned the weapon with skill and courage."</a>

              <a>After receiving his Medal of Honor on 10 July 1863, the Corporal was transferred to the Norfolk Navy Yard and was subsequently posted to the nine-gun sloop USS Seminole as "Orderly Sergeant in Charge." For the remainder of the war Mackie served aboard this ship. He was discharged from the Corps 24 August 1865 in Boston, after having completed four years and four months of service with the Marines.</a>

              <a>He later married and settled in the Philadelphia P.N., area. Mackie died in 1910.</a>

              <a>An interesting after note on the action which earned him his Medal of Honor, Drewry's Bluff, and the Confederate Fort which the Union was attacking was a major training base and post for the small Confederate Marine Corps. It was never taken from the river, but was eventually outflanked during the Federal push on Richmond. Today it is a National Park with several of the revetments still in evidence.</a>

              SGT. JAMES MARTIN 11

                (Service rendered under name of Martin Schwenk.) Rank and Organization: Sergeant, U.S. Marine Corps. Born: 1826, Derry, Ireland. Accredited To: Pennsylvania. G.O. No: 45, 31 December 1864.

                CITATION:

                As captain of a gun on board the U.S.S. Richmond during action against rebel forts and gunboats and with the ram Tennessee in Mobile Bay, 5 August 1864. Despite damage to his ship and the loss of several men on board as enemy fire raked her decks, Sgt. Martin fought his gun with skill and courage throughout the furious 2_hour battle which resulted in the surrender of the rebel ram Tennessee and in the damaging and destruction of batteries at Fort Morgan.

                Birth: 1826

                Death:  Oct. 29, 1895

                Buried: Mount Moriah Cemetery
                Philadelphia
                Philadelphia County
                Pennsylvania, USA
                Plot: Naval Asylum Plot

                Civil War Congressional Medal of Honor Recipient. Served in the Civil War as a Sergeant in the United States Marine Corps on board the USS Richmond. He was awarded the CMOH for his bravery at Mobile Bay, Alabama on August 5, 1864. His citation reads "As captain of a gun during action against rebel forts and gunboats and with the ram Tennessee in Mobile Bay, 5 August 1864. Despite damage to his ship and the loss of several men on board as enemy fire raked her decks, Sgt. Martin fought his gun with skill and courage throughout the furious 2-hour battle which resulted in the surrender of the rebel ram Tennessee and in the damaging and destruction of batteries at Fort Morgan". His Medal was issued on December 31, 1864. He was one of 31 "Richmond" crewmembers to be awarded the Medal of Honor for their bravery during the Civil War (the others being Yeoman Thomas Atkinson, Quartermaster John Brazell, Captain of the Top Robert Brown, Master-At-Arms William M. Carr, Coxswain James B. Chandler, Quartermaster Thomas Cripps, Chief Quartermaster Cornelius Cronin, Boatswain's Mate Charles Deakin, Chief Boatswain's Mate William Densmore, Coal Heaver William Doolen, Boatswain's Mate Adam Duncan, Coxswain Hugh Hamilton, Coxswain Thomas Hayes, Fireman Second Class John Hickman, Captain of the Top John H. James, Fireman First Class Matthew McClelland, Captain of the Top James McIntosh, Marine Corps Sergeant Andrew Miller, Captain of the Top James H. Morgan, Captain of the Forecastle George Parks, Fireman First Class John Rush, Seaman Hendrick Sharp, Coxswain Lebbeus Simkins, Second Captain of the Top John Smith, Coxswain Oloff Smith, Ordinary Seaman Walter B. Smith, Marine Corps Orderly Sergeant David Sprowle, Coxswain Alexander H. Truett, Fireman First Class Joseph E. Vantine and Quartermaster William Wells). (bio by: Russ Dodge)

                SGT ANDREW MILLER

                  Rank and Organization: Sergeant, U.S. Marine Corps. Born: 1836, Germany. Accredited To: Washington, D.C. G.O. No.: 45, 31 December 1864. CITATION: As captain of a gun on board the U.S.S. Richmond during action against rebel forts and gunboats and with the ram Tennessee in Mobile Bay, 5 August 1864. Despite damage to his ship and the loss of several men on board as enemy fire raked her decks, Sgt. Miller fought his gun with skill and courage throughout the furious 2_hour battle which resulted in the surrender of the rebel ram Tennessee and in the damaging and destruction of batteries at Fort Morgan.

                  SGT. CHRISTOPHER NUGENT

                    Rank and Organization: Orderly Sergeant, U.S. Marine Corps. Born: 1840, County of Caven, Ireland. Accredited To: Massachusetts. G.O. No.: 32, 16 April 1864.

                    CITATION:

                    Serving on board the U.S.S. Fort Henry, Crystal River, Fla., 15 June 1863. Reconnoitering on the Crystal River on this date and in charge of a boat from the Fort Henry, Orderly Sgt. Nugent ordered an assault upon a rebel breastwork fortification. In this assault, the orderly sergeant and his comrades drove a guard of 11 rebels into the swamp, capturing their arms and destroying their camp equipage while gallantly withholding fire to prevent harm to a woman among the fugitives. On 30 July 1863, he further proved his courage by capturing a boat off Depot Key, Fla., containing 2 men and a woman with their baggage.

                    Birth: 1838

                    Death: May 6, 1898

                    Buried: Saint Raymonds Cemetery
                    Bronx
                    Bronx County
                    New York, USA
                    Plot: Section 6, Range 27, Grave 39

                    CORP. MILES M. OVIATT

                      Rank and Organization: Corporal, U.S. Marine Corps. Born: 1841, Cattaraugus County, N.Y. Accredited To: New York. G.O. No.: 45, 31 December 1864.

                      CITATION:

                      On board the U.S.S. Brooklyn during action against rebel forts and gunboats and with the ram Tennessee in Mobile Bay, 5 August 1864. Despite severe damage to his ship and the loss of several men on board as enemy fire raked the deck, Cpl. Oviatt fought his gun with skill and courage throughout the furious 2-hour battle which resulted in the surrender of the rebel ram Tennessee.

                      Birth: Dec. 1, 1840

                      Death:  Nov. 1, 1880

                      Burial: Pleasant Valley Cemetery
                      Olean
                      Cattaraugus County
                      New York, USA
                      Plot: Section 36, Lot 36

                      CORP. JOHN RANNAHAN

                        Rank and Organization: Corporal, U.S. Marine Corps. Born: 1836, County of Monahan, Ireland. Accredited To: Pennsylvania. G.O. No.: 59, 22 June 1865.

                        CITATION: On board the U.S.S. Minnesota in the assault on Fort Fisher, 15 January 1865. Landing on the beach with the assaulting party from his ship, Cpl. Rannahan advanced to the top of the sandhill and partly through the breach in the palisades despite enemy fire which killed or wounded many officers and men. When more than two-thirds of the men became seized with panic and retreated on the run, he remained with the party until dark when it came safely away, bringing its wounded, its arms and its colors.

                        Civil War Congressional Medal of Honor Recipient. He was born in County Monaghan, Ireland. He entered the United States Marine Corps in Pennsylvania. His rank was Corporal. His citation reads "On board the USS Minnesota, in the assault on Fort Fisher, 15 January 1865. Landing on the beach with the assaulting party from his ship, Cpl. Rannahan advanced to the top of the sandhill and partly through the breach in the palisades, despite enemy fire which killed or wounded many officers and men. When more than two-thirds of the men became seized with panic and retreated on the run, he remained with the party until dark when it came safely away, bringing its wounded, its arms, and its colors." (bio by: Don Morfe)

                        SGT. JAMES S. ROANTREE

                          Rank and Organization: Sergeant, U.S. Marine Corps. Born: 1835, Dublin, Ireland. Accredited To: New York. G.O. No.: 45, 31 December 1864.

                          _On board the U.S.S. Oneida during action against rebel forts and gunboats and with the ram Tennessee in Mobile Bay, 5 August 1864. Despite damage to his ship and the loss of several men on board as enemy fire raked her decks and penetrated her boilers, Sgt. Roantree performed his duties with skill and courage throughout the furious battle which resulted in the surrender of the rebel ram Tennessee and in the damaging and destruction of batteries at Fort Morgan.

                          Civil War Congressional Medal of Honor Recipient. He served as First Sergeant in the United States Marine Corps. His citation reads "On board the USS Oneida during action against rebel forts and gunboats and with the ram Tennessee in Mobile Bay, 5 August 1864. Despite damage to his ship and the loss of several men onboard as the enemy fire raked her decks and penetrated her boilers, Sgt. Roantree performed his duties with skill and courage throughout the furious battle which resulted in the surrender of the rebel ram Tennessee and in the damaging and destruction of batteries at Fort Morgan." (bio by: Don Morfe)

                          Birth: 1835

                          Death:  Feb. 24, 1873

                          BURIED: New Calvary Cemetery
                          Mattapan
                          Suffolk County
                          Massachusetts, USA
                          Plot: Section 10E, Row 5, Grave 5_

                          PVT. JOHN SHIVERS

                            Rank and Organization: Private, U.S. Marine Corps. Born: 1830 Canada. Accredited To: New Jersey. G.O. No.: 59, 22 June 1865.

                            CITATION:

                            On board the U.S.S. Minnesota, in the assault on Fort Fisher, 15 January 1865. Landing on the beach with the assaulting party from his ship, Pvt. Shivers advanced to the top of the sandhill and partly through the breach in the palisades despite enemy fire which killed or wounded many officers and men. When more than two-thirds of the men became seized with panic and retreated on the run, he remained with the party until dark when it came safely away, bringing its wounded, its arms and its colors.

                            CORP. WILLARD M. SMITH

                              Rank and Organization: Corporal, U.S. Marine Corps. Born: 1840, Alleghany, N.Y. Accredited To: New York. G.O. No.: 45, 31 December 1864.

                              CITATION:

                              On board the U.S.S. Brooklyn during action against rebel forts and gunboats, and with the ram Tennessee in Mobile Bay, 5 August 1864. Despite severe damage to his ship and the loss of several men on board as enemy fire continued to fall, Cpl. Smith fought his gun with skill and courage throughout the furious 2-hour battle which resulted in the surrender of the rebel ram Tennessee.

                              Birth: 1840Death:

                              Mar. 26, 1918

                              BURIAL: Elmlawn Cemetery
                              Tonawanda
                              Erie County
                              New York, USA
                              Plot: Catalph Lawn Section, Lot 62

                              SGT. DAVID SPROWLE

                                Rank and Organization: Orderly Sergeant, U.S. Marine Corps. Born: 1811, Lisbon, N.Y. Accredited To: New York. G.O. No.: 45, 31 December 1864.

                                CITATION:

                                On board the U.S.S. Richmond during action against rebel forts and gunboats, and with the ram Tennessee in Mobile Bay, 5 August 1864. Despite damage to his ship and the loss of several men on board as enemy fire raked her decks, Orderly Sgt. Sprowle inspired the men of the marine guard and directed a division of great guns throughout the furious battle which resulted in the surrender of the rebel ram Tennessee and in the damaging and destruction of batteries at Fort Morgan.

                                Red Mills Cemetery
                                Lisbon
                                St. Lawrence County
                                New York

                                PVT. HENRY A. THOMPSON

                                  Rank and Organization: Private, U.S. Marine Corps. Born: 1841, England. Accredited To: Pennsylvania. G.O. No.: 59, 22 June 1865.

                                  CITATION:

                                  On board the U.S.S. Minnesota in the assault on Fort Fisher, 15 January 1865. Landing on the beach with the assaulting party from his ship, Private Thompson advanced partly through a breach in the palisades and nearer to the fort than any man from his ship despite enemy fire which killed or wounded many officers and men. When more than two-thirds of the men became seized with panic and retreated on the run, he remained with the party until dark, when it came safely away, bringing its wounded, its arms and its colors.

                                  Civil War Congressional Medal of Honor Recipient. His true name was Roderick P. Connelly. He served as a Private in the United States Marine Corps. His citation reads "On board the USS Minnesota in the assault on Fort Fisher, 15 January 1865. Landing on the beach with the assaulting party from his ship, Pvt. Thompson advanced partly through a breach in the palisades and nearer to the fort than any man from his ship despite enemy fire which killed or wounded many officers and men. When more than two-thirds of the men became seized with panic and retreated on the run, he remained with the party until dark, when it came safely away, bringing its wounded, its arms and its colors." (bio by: Don Morfe)

                                  Birth: 1841Death: Feb. 16, 1889

                                  Buried: Calvary Cemetery
                                  Woodside
                                  Queens County
                                  New York, USA
                                  Plot: 2nd Calvary, Section 11, Range 35, Plot O, Grave 9 UNMARKED

                                  CORP. ANDREW J. TOMLIN

                                    Rank and Organization: Corporal, U.S. Marine Corps. Born: 1844, Goshen, N.J. Accredited To: New Jersey. G.O. No.: 59, 22 June 1865.

                                    CITATION:

                                    As corporal of the guard on board the U.S.S. Wabash during the assault on Fort Fisher, on 15 January 1865. As 1 of 200 marines assembled to hold a line of entrenchments in the rear of the fort which the enemy threatened to attack in force following a retreat in panic by more than two-thirds of the assaulting ground forces, Cpl. Tomlin took position in line and remained until morning when relief troops arrived from the fort. When one of his comrades was struck down by enemy fire, he unhesitatingly advanced under a withering fire of musketry into an open plain close to the fort and assisted the wounded man to a place of safety.

                                    Birth: Mar. 15, 1845Death:

                                    Nov. 1, 1905

                                    BURIED: Goshen Methodist Cemetery
                                    Goshen
                                    Cape May County
                                    New Jersey

                                    SGT. PINKERTON R. VAUGHN

                                      Rank and Organization: Sergeant, U.S. Marine Corps. Born: 1839, Downingtown, Pa. Accredited To: Pennsylvania. G.O. N__o.: 17, 10 July 1863.

                                      CITATION:

                                      Serving on board the U.S.S. Mississippi during her abandonment and firing in the action with the Port Hudson batteries, 14 March 1863. During the abandonment of the Mississippi which had to be grounded, Sgt. Vaughn rendered invaluable assistance to his commanding officer, remaining with the ship until all the crew had landed and the ship had been fired to prevent its falling into enemy hands. Persistent until the last, and conspicuously cool under the heavy shellfire, Sgt. Vaughn was finally ordered to save himself as he saw fit.