Jacob Beeler

Jacob Beeler

US Revolutionary War · US Army

    Jacob Beeler 1761-1842. Marker at Find-A-Grave #117396266. Tennessee: Son of John Valentine Beeler 1737-1823 and Mary Turney Beeler 1740-1810. Born in Frederick County Virginia in the Fall of 1761. Moved in April 1770 to the waters of Beaver Creek, north of the Holston River in what is now Sullivan County Tennessee. Enlisted as a Ranger in the North Carolina Troops in June 1775. _Overmountain Man, s_erved at the Battle of King's Mountain South Carolina, October 7, 1780, with his younger brother Joseph Beeler 1762-1845. Filed for a United States Pension on August 22, 1832, in Sullivan County, TN, at the age of 70 years. Lt. Edward Cox and Private Peter Hughs were witness to this pension application. Final Payment Voucher September 1842.

    Jacob Beeler 1761-1842, King's Mountain Rifle

    • King's Mountain National Military Park, Blacksburg, S.C.

    The Jacob Beeler 1761-1842 rifle is on display at the King's Mountain National Military Park Visitor's Center, Blacksburg, South Carolina. The owner is a descendent of John Valentine Beeler 1737-1823, Grainger County, TN. The firearm was brought to North Carolina Territory by John Valentine Beeler in 1770 and given to his son Jacob Beeler 1761-1842. The King's Mountain Museum is aware of the provenance of the weapon and consider it a relic of the engagement. This photo taken 9-6-2013 of the display case in the museum.

    Note: The owner has stated that the weapon has absolutely nothing to do with a Jacob Beeler 1750-1843 buried in Beeler Cemetery, Bristol, TN.

    Veterans Administration Marker Jacob Beeler 1761-1842

    • Washburn, Tennessee

    The marker shown has been furnished by the V.A. in 2012 and placed as a memorial marker for the King's Mountain Soldier Jacob Beeler 1761-1842. The service was reviewed and approved by the V.A. All information on the marker may be found in the United States Pension File S.5277 of Jacob Beeler 1761-1842 and payment records of the GAO archives.

    The marker is placed in Liberty Hill Cemetery, Washburn, TN, as a memorial marker according to the regulations of the V.A. and is the property of the United States of America. The cemetery was donated to Beeler Church by his brother, Joseph Beeler 1762-1845. Both served at the Battle of King's Mountain, South Carolina, 7 October 1780, under Captain John Pemberton, Colonel Isaac Shelby commanding.

    Jacob Beeler 1761-1842 and Joseph Beeler 1762-1845, deposed in the Isaac Shelby Dispute of 1823. V.A. markers for Joseph Beeler 1762-1845 in place near Jacob's.

    Note: This V.A. marker has nothing to do with a Jacob Beeler 1750-1843 buried in Beeler Cemetery, Bristol, TN.

    "Weapons of King's Mountain", Creekmore Collection

    • Bristol, TN Show

    The photograph of two individuals in front of memorabilia is also called "Beeler Boys".

    The person on the right of the photograph is Judge Creekmore. He is at an exhibition with some of his collection. The photo often has a "corrected" annotation attached to it. The banner below the table has "...cestors, John and Jacob Bee.." visible and it is falsely claimed to be incorrect. That is not the case and is another example of the "Beeler Boys" Family Hoax going on for the last twenty years.


    The Judge is a descendent of John Valentine Beeler 1737-1823. The Jacob Beeler he is referring to is his family Jacob Beeler 1761-1842. He knows exactly who he is referring to and it has absolutely nothing to do with a Jacob Beeler 1750-1843 who is buried in Beeler Cemetery, Bristol, TN.

    It would be appreciated if those commenting on the memorabilia photograph and the King's Mountain Rifle of Jacob Beeler 1761-1842 would afford the decency of a proper recognition of the artifacts.

    The Judge is also the owner of the King's Mountain Rifle of Jacob Beeler 1761-1842, son of John Valentine Beeler 1737-1823, that is on display in the King's Mountain National Military Park Visitor's Center, Blacksburg, South Carolina. It was carried on the battlefield 7 October 1780. The National Military Park is aware of the provenance of the weapon and consider it a relic of the engagement.


    Note: Neither the memorabilia in the photograph of the Judge or the Jacob Beeler rifle at King's Mountain, S.C. have anything to do with a Jacob Beeler 1750-1843, buried in Beeler Cemetery, Bristol, TN. This Jacob Beeler 1750-1843, is nothing but a "fictitious brother" not related to John Valentine Beeler 1737-1823. The so called Bible "proof" claimed for twenty years does not exist and is just a family hoax. We have a copy of the Underwood Bible.