John Bell Hood

John Bell Hood

Civil War (Confederate) · Confederate Army · General

Confederate general during the American Civil War. Hood had a reputation for bravery and aggressiveness that sometimes bordered on recklessness. Arguably one of the best brigade and division commanders in the Confederate States Army, Hood became increasingly ineffective as he was promoted to lead larger, independent commands late in the war, and his career was marred by his decisive defeats leading an army in the Atlanta Campaign and the Franklin-Nashville Campaign.

Civil War (Confederate) (1861 - 1865)
Rank

General

Added by: bruceyrock632
Battles

Peninsula Campaign, Battle of Gaines's Mill, Second Battle of Bull Run, Battle of Antietam, Battle of Fredericksburg, Battle of Gettysburg, Battle of Chickamauga, Atlanta Campaign, Franklin-Nashville Campaign

Added by: fold3_content
Branch

Confederate Army

Added by: bruceyrock632
Service Start Date

1861

Added by: fold3_content
Commands held

Texas Brigade; Second Corps, Army of Tennessee; Army of Tennessee

Added by: fold3_content
Service End Date

1965

Added by: bruceyrock632
Conflict Period

Civil War (Confederate)

Added by: bruceyrock632
Service Start Date

1961

Added by: bruceyrock632
Service End Date

1865

Added by: fold3_content
Served For

United States of America

Added by: Fold3_Team
Other Service
Branch

Army

Added by: fold3_content
Service End Date

1861

Added by: fold3_content
Service Start Date

1853

Added by: fold3_content
Conflict Period

Other Service

Added by: fold3_content
Served For

United States of America

Added by: Fold3_Team

Stories about John Bell Hood

General John Bell Hood

    Born in Owingsville, Kentucky in 1831 and a West Point Graduate at the age of 22, John Bell Hood was one of the most rapidly promoted leaders in the Confederate history of the Civil War.  After serving in California and Texas for the United States Military, he resigned his commission in April of 1861 to join the Confederacy as a cavalry captain.  From there, he was soon promoted to colonel of the Texas 4th Infantry.  Thereafter he distinguished himself on a dozen fields, beginning in the Peninsula Campaign and at Second Manassas. At the Battle of Gaines' Mill on June 27, he distinguished himself by leading his brigade in a charge that broke the Union line - arguably the most successful Confederate performance in the Seven Days Battles. While Hood escaped the battle without an injury, every officer in his brigade was killed or wounded.

    He was promoted to major general in 1862 serving with distinction at Sharpsburg and at Fredericksburg.  Hood was a significant player at the Battle of Gettysburg, being ordered by Longstreet to attack the Union’s left flank against his own wishes.  His command was bloodily blunted by union forces in Devils Den, and finally undone at Little Round Top. Hood was severely wounded in the arm at Gettysburg and was forced to hand off command, and soon thereafter lost a leg at Chickamauga.  After some recovery, he was appointed to lieutenant general serving under J.E. Johnston, whom he would surpass in rank in the spring of 1864.  Hood conducted the remainder of the Atlanta Campaign with the strong aggressive actions for which he was famous. He launched four major offensives that summer in an attempt to break Sherman's siege of Atlanta, starting almost immediately with an attack along Peachtree Creek; however, all of the offensives failed, with significant Confederate casualties. Finally, on September 2, 1864, Hood evacuated the city of Atlanta, burning as many military supplies and installations as possible.

    Hood marched his army into Tennessee where his forces were crippled trying to break through Union breastworks at the Battle of Franklin.  His army suffered again at the Battle of Nashville from Union forces lead by General Thomas.  Hood was relieved of his rank (at his own request) in January of 1865 and returned to his post as lieutenant general.  He desired to take control of the Texas army, but they surrendered before his arrival. In May 1865, Hood gave himself up to Union forces in Natchez, Mississippi.  After the war, Hood moved to New Orleans and lived there with his wife and children until he died in 1879 of yellow fever.

    See all 8 stories…

    Additional Info
    Owner:
    bruceyrock632 - Anyone can contribute
    Created:
    6/2/2013
    Modified:
    10/20/2014
    View count:
    1269 (recently viewed: 11)