VMI Alumni and Faculty General Officers

VMI Alumni and Faculty General Officers - Stories

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Raleigh E. Colston, Class of 1846

    • Biographical Information

      Early Life
      Raleigh Edward Colston, b. Paris, France on October 31, 1825. Adopted son of Dr. Raleigh Edward Colston (1796-1881) and his wife Maria Theresa, Duchess of Valmey (ca. 1775-1845). The young Colston was sent to the United States in 1842, in care of his uncle Edward Colston of Berkeley Co. [West] Virginia, to complete his education.

      VMI record
      Entered VMI on July 8, 1843; was graduated on July 4, 1846, standing 4th in a class of 14.

      Marriage
      Louise Meriwether Bowyer of "Thorn Hill," Rockbridge Co., Virginia. Two daughters: Mary Frances and Louise Elizabeth.

      Pre-Civil War
      Professor of French at VMI from 1846 until outbreak of war. In November 1859, he accompanied a contigent of VMI cadets assigned to guard duty at the execution of abolitionist John Brown.

      Civil War
      Commissioned Col. 16th Virginia Infantry Regiment; 1862 Dec. appointed Brigadier General and led brigade under Longstreet in the Peninsula; given brigade under Jackson in April 1863 and commanded a division at Chancellorsville; served under Beauregard in defense of Petersburg in 1864; in command at Lynchburg at end of war.

      Post-war
      Established military school in North Carolina;Colonel Egyptian army, 1873-1879; War Dept. clerk, 1882-1894; died 1896, at Soldiers' Home, Richmond, VA; Buried: Hollywood Cemetery
      Richmond
      Richmond city
      Virginia, USA

      • Professor French & Military Science Virginia Military Institute, Brigadier General Confederate States Army, Colonel Egyptian Army. He was born in Paris, France, coming to the United States in 1842. The adopted son of a Virginia physician, he entered the Virginia Military Institute, graduating 4 years later. He then joined the faculty of his alma mater as a professor of French and Military Science, remaining there until 1861. When the war began, he was appointed Colonel of the 16th Virginia. On December 24, 1861, he received promotion to Brigadier General and command of a brigade of 3 regiments. During the Peninsula Campaign he served in Major General James Longstreet's command. For his service at Williamsburg, he received a mild commendation in the reports, but for his disputed role at Seven Pines, he was mildly rebuked. After Seven Pines he was stricken with a long and obscure illness, leaving the army until December. In Spring 1863 Major General Thomas J. "Stonewall" Jackson chose his old VMI colleague to command Brigadier General William B. Taliaferro's brigade. He was the senior Brigadier of the Stonewall Division and, when its commander, Major General Isaac Trimble, could not return to command because of a crippling wound, he assumed command divisional leadership. With limited combat experience, and having been with the division less than a month, he led it at Chancellorsville. Because of his performance there, he was relieved of his command on May 20, 1863. Assigned to General P.G.T. Beauregard at Petersburg, Virginia, he served under him during the operations there in 1864. At the end of the war, he was commanding Confederate forces at Lynchburg. After the war, he joined the Egyptian army as a Colonel. Badly crippled in a fall from a camel, he returned to the United States in 1879. He died impoverished in the Confederate Soldiers' Home in Richmond, Virginia. (bio by: Ugaalltheway)

    John Echols, Class of 1843

      Biographical Information

      Early Life
      John Echols, born March 20, 1823, Lynchburg, Virginia; son of Joseph Echols and Eliza Frances Lambeth.

      VMI record
      attended VMI from August 15, 1840 until August 14, 1841, when he resigned; Honorary graduate, VMI Class of 1843.

      Pre-Civil War
      graduate Washington College (now Washington and Lee University); studied law at Harvard; practiced law briefly in Shenandoah Valley, then moved to Union, Monroe County [West] Virginia where he was a county prosecutor; in 1860, helped to organize and was leader of the Monroe Guards, a local militia unit. This unit subsequently became part of the 27th Virginia Infantry (Co. D).

      Marriage
      1st- Mary Jane Caperton
      2nd- Mrs. Mary C. Reid

      Civil War
      Commanded 27th Virginia Infantry Regiment; severely wounded at Kernstown; promoted April 1862 to Brigadier General; brigade commander in Division of General John C. Breckinridge; at Battle of New Market  (May 15, 1864) commanded infantry brigade

      Post-War
      Returned to law practice in Staunton; was President of National Valley Bank, and of Chesapeake, Ohio and Southwestern Railroad Company; died in Staunton, Virginia on May 24, 1896;

      Buried: Thornrose Cemetery
      Staunton
      Augusta County
      Virginia, USA

      Birkett D. Fry, Class of 1843

        Biographical Information

        Early Life
        Birkett Davenport Fry, born June 24, 1822 in Kanawha County, [now] West Virginia; son of Thornton Fry and Eliza Thompson.

        VMI record
        Entered VMI on July 20, 1840 as a member of the Class of 1843; resigned on June 2, 1841.

        Pre-Civil War
        Entered West Point in 1842, but left before graduating because of an academic deficiency (math); practiced law; lst Lieut., United States Army, during Mexican War; practiced law in California, 1849-1855; took part in Walker's expedition to Nicaragua; returned to California where he remained until 1859, when he moved to Tallassee, Alabama; managed cotton mill owned by his wife's family.

        Marriage
        Martha Micou Baker in 1853, the daughter of William and Ann Micou of Augusta, GA.

        Civil War
        At outbreak of Civil War commissioned Colonel, 13th Alabama Infantry Regiment; wounded at Seven Pines, Antietam, Chancellorsville, and Gettysburg; appointed Brigadier General in May 1864 and commanded Walker's and Archer's brigades at Cold Harbor; commanded the military district in Augusta, GA until end of war.

        Post-war
        Returned to cotton manufacturing business in Alabama and Richmond, Virginia; died January 21, 1891, Richmond, VA.

        Samuel Garland, Class of 1849

          Biographical Information

          Early Life
          Samuel Garland, born December 16, 1830 at Lynchburg, Virginia. Parents: Maurice Garland, an attorney, and Caroline M. Garland. Maternal grandparents: Spottswood Garland and Lucinda Rose. Before enrolling at VMI Samuel attended Randolph Macon College.

          VMI record
          Matriculated on October 22, 1846 at age 16; was graduated on July 4, 1849, standing 3rd in a class of 24.

          Marriage
          Elizabeth Campbell Meem in 1856; she died on June 12, 1861; their only child, Samuel, died in August 1861.

          Pre-Civil War
          Studied law at University of Virginia; practiced in Lynchburg, VA. Following John Brown's raid at Harpers Ferry in 1859, Garland organized the Lynchburg Home Guard.

          Civil War
          Colonel, 11th Virginia Infantry Regiment; led his regiment 1st Manassas; wounded at Williamsburg but did not leave field; promoted to Brigadier General in May 1862 and commanded his brigade at Seven Pines, Gaines's Mill, and Malvern Hill; mortally wounded on Sept 14, 1862, at South Mountain;

          Buried: Presbyterian Cemetery
          Lynchburg
          Lynchburg city
          Virginia, USA

          William Y. C. Humes, Class of 1851

            Biographical Information

            Early Life
            William Young Conn Humes, born June 1830 in Abingdon, Virginia. Parents: John Newton Humes and Jane Conn White.

            VMI record
            Enrolled at VMI on November 20, 1848; was graduated on July 4, 1851, standing 2nd in a class of 29 (distinguished graduate); classmate of Gen. Alfred J. Vaughan.

            Marriage
            Married 1st- Margaret Preston White of Abingdon, VA; 2 children; Margaret died in Knoxville before 1863.
            2nd- 1863, Sallie Elder of Memphis, TN; 4 children.

            Pre-Civil War
            Read law; lawyer in Knoxville and Memphis, Tennessee.

            Civil War
            1861-Captain Artillery, commanded guns at New Madrid; captured and imprisoned at Johnson's Island; after exchange became cavalry officer; appointed Brigadier General Nov. 1863 and led brigade in Wheeler's Corps fought in Tennessee, Georgia the Carolinas; appointed Major General March 1865.

            Post-war
            Resumed law practice in Memphis; died September 11, 1882 in Huntsville, Alabama.

            Stonewell Jackson

              Thomas Jonathan (Stonewall) Jackson

              Served on the VMI Faculty as Professor of Natural and Experimental Philosophy & Instructor of Artillery from August 1851 until the beginning of the Civil War in April 1861. The Virginia Military Institute Archives holds a large collection of Stonewall Jackson's personal papers, Jackson images, and other information about his life and times. Included on this page are links to full text correspondence, as well as to full text information about various topics of interest to Jackson researchers.

              Alexander C. Jones, Class of 1850

                Biographical Information

                Early Life
                Alexander Caldwell Jones, 1830, Marshall County [West] Virginia. Parents: Garrison B. Jones and Martha Houston.

                VMI record
                Enrolled at VMI on July 28, 1846; was graduated on July 4, 1850, standing 16th in a class of 17.

                Marriage
                1st- Ella Clemens (1857) of Wheeling [West] Virginia; Issue- Clemens Ap-Catesby Jones; Minnie Clemens Jones.
                2nd- name unknown; one daughter

                Pre-Civil War
                Studied law; District Attorney in Minnesota territory; probate judge, St. Paul, MN; Minnesota's first adjutant general (1858-1860)

                Civil War
                Lt. Col. and Colonel, 44th Virginia Infantry Regiment; Chief of Staff to Generals Johnston, Magruder, Walker; resigned staff position to serve in field; promoted to Brigadier General; at end of war was in command of brigade in Texas.

                Post-war
                Diplomat; U.S. Consul in Japan and China; died January 13, 1898 in China.

                John R. Jones, Class of 1848

                  Biographical Information

                  Early Life
                  John Robert Jones, born March 12, 1827 at Harrisonburg, Virginia. Parents: David S. Jones and Harriet Yost. Attended private schools in Harrisonburg before entering VMI.

                  VMI record
                  Entered VMI on July 28, 1845 and was graduated on July 4, 1848; stood 7th in a class of 24 graduates.

                  Marriage
                  Married twice. 1st Miss Brashear of Annapolis, MD (no issue). 2nd Miss Weatherall of Baltimore, MD; divorced after approx. one year; they had one daughter. He also had two children by his mistress, Malinda Rice, a former slave who came to work in Jones' household at the age of 16. Rice's and Jones' granddaughter, Carrie Allen McCray, recently published a history of this relationship: Freedom's Child, the Life of A Confederate General's Black Daughter (Algonquin, 1998).

                  Pre-Civil War
                  Taught school in Florida and was Principal of a military school in Urbanna, Maryland.

                  Civil War
                  Lt. Col., 33rd Virginia Infantry Regiment; appointed Brigadier General (see this letter from Stonewall Jackson regarding the appointment) in 1862 but was never confirmed; commanded 2d Brigade under Jackson at Cold Harbor and Malvern Hill; accused of cowardice by subordinates for his actions at Antietam and Chancellorsville and never resumed command; captured by Union troops in Smithburg, Maryland, on July 4, 1863 and never exchanged; imprisoned at Fort Warren, Mass, until end of war.

                  Post-war
                  Businessman and commissioner in chancery for circuit court in Harrisonburg, VA; died April 1, 1901, Harrisonburg.

                  James H. Lane, Class of 1854

                    Biographical Information

                    Early Life
                    James Henry Lane, b. July 28, 1833, Mathews Court House,Virginia. Parents: Henry Gardner Lane and Mary Ann Henry Barkwell

                    VMI record
                    Enrolled at VMI on July 22,1851; was graduated on July 4, 1854,standing 2nd in a class of 14.

                    Marriage
                    Charlotte Randolph Meade of Richmond, VA; they had four daughters (Lidie, Mary, Kate, Lottie)

                    Pre-Civil War
                    Attended University of Virginia, 1856-1857; civil engineer; teacher (VMI, West Seminary at Tallahassee, FL., North Carolina Military Institute at Charlotte, NC).

                    Civil War
                    Major and Lt. Col., 1st North Carolina Infantry Regt; Colonel, 28th North Carolina Infantry; appointed Brigadier General Nov. 1862; commanded his brigade at Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, the Wilderness, and Petersburg.

                    Post-war
                    Educator; taught at various universities, notably Virginia Polytechnic Institute, Missouri School of Mines, and Alabama Agricultural and Mechanical College (now Auburn University), where he was professor of civil engineering. He died at Auburn, AL on September 21, 1907 and is buried: Pinehill Cemetery
                    Auburn
                    Lee County
                    Alabama, USA
                    Plot: Section 1

                    Papers
                    An extensive collection of Lane's personal papers are located at the Auburn University Archives. VMI has information about his cadetship, photos, and other biographical information, as well as 2 miscellaneous family documents

                    William Mahone, Class of 1847

                      Biographical Information

                      Early Life
                      William Mahone, born 1826 December 1 at on a farm near Monroe, Southampton Co., Virginia. Parents: Fielding Jordan Mahone, a merchant in Southampton Co., and Martha Drew. Paternal Grandparents: William Mahone (b. Ireland) and Nancy Jordan.

                      VMI record
                      Enrolled at VMI on July 20, 1844 at age of 17½; was graduated on July 5, 1847, standing 8th out of 12 graduates. Mahone supposedly told fellow VMI cadet William Pryor (Class of 1848) the following story about his entrance into VMI:

                      Mahone's father ran a tavern in Southampton County and one day a man in great style with a fine pair of horse, carriage and negro servant drove up to the tavern. Soon they began to gamble and Mahone senior lost most of his money. He called his young son, William, and told him to take his hand --he was going to go to sleep. When he returned, young Mahone had won all of the man's money, horses and carriage, and they were gambling then for the servant. The father told his son to give him the money. Young Mahone said: "Here is what you lost. I am going to keep my winnings and educate myself." With these winnings he came to VMI.

                      Marriage
                      Married Otelia Butler on February 8, 1855; she was the daughter of Dr. Robert Butler of Smithfield, Isle of Wight Co., Virginia and Otelia Voinard of Petersburg, VA. William and Otelia had 13 children, 3 of whom lived into adulthood (William, Robert, and Otelia).

                      Pre-Civil War
                      Teacher at the Rappahonnock Academy, Caroline Co., Virginia, 1848-1849; 1851-1861: civil engineer; Chief Engineer and subsequently President, Chief Engineer and General Superintendent of the Norfolk and Petersburg railroad.

                      Civil War
                      Lt. Col. and Colonel of the 6th Virginia Infantry Regiment; promoted to Brigadier General November 1861; during the Peninsular Campaign led his brigade at Seven Pines and Malvern Hill; also fought at 2nd Manassas, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, the Wilderness, and Spotsylvania; promoted to Major General on July 30, 1864 for his performance at the Battle of the Crater (near Petersburg, VA).

                      Post-war
                      Returned to engineering and continued to be instrumental in developing railway system in Virginia; unsuccessful bid for governor in 1877; United States Senator, 1881-1887; died October 8, 1895; buried Blandford Cemetery, near Petersburg, VA.

                      John McCausland, Class of 1857

                        Biographical Information

                        Early Life
                        Born St. Louis, Missouri on September 15, 1837. Parents: John McCausland (b. County Tyrone, Ireland) and Harriett Kyle (b. Botetourt Co., Virginia). After the death of his parents (ca. 1849) he came to Mason County [West] Virginia to live with his uncle, Alexander McCausland.

                        VMI record
                        Enrolled at VMI on August 2, 1853; was graduated on July 4, 1857, standing first in a class of 22 (distinguished graduate).

                        Marriage
                        Emmett Hannah, 1878; 3 sons and 1 daughter.

                        Pre-Civil War
                        Studied at University of Virginia; Assistant Professor at VMI (Math and Tactics); in 1859 accompanied the detachment of VMI cadets sent to stand guard at John Brown's execution.

                        Civil War
                        Commissioned Colonel, 36th Virginia Infantry; April 1862-May 1864 commanded brigade in Dept. of Western Virginia; appointed Brigadier General 1864 May 18; led cavalry brigade against Gen. Hunter in Shenandoah Valley in May-June 1864 and delayed Union advance upon Lynchburg, VA. until Confederate Gen. Early could occupy the city; led cavalry raid into Pennsylvania and was responsible for the burning of Chambersburg, PA.

                        Post-war
                        Spent several years in Europe and Mexico before returning to his farm in West Virginia; died at his home near Point Pleasant, West Virginia, on January 23, 1927.

                        Buried: Smith Cemetery
                        Henderson
                        Mason County
                        West Virginia, USA

                        Brigadier General, Confederate States Army. He was born at St. Louis, Missouri, the son of Irish immigrants. He was only 7 years old when his parents died, and went to live with his uncle, Alexander McCausland, whose farm was in what is now West Virginia. In 1857 he graduated first in his class from Virginia Military Institute. Ater studying a year at the University of Virginia, he returned to the institute as an assistant professor of mathematics and tactics. In 1859 he, along with Thomas Jackson, accompanied the detachment of VMI cadets sent to stand guard at John Brown's execution. In spring 1861 he organized and became Colonel of the 36th Virginia Infantry, which saw service in its home area of western Virginia as well as at Fort Donelson, where it was one of the few Confederate units to escape capture. Known as "Tiger John" by his men, he performed thereafter in southwestern Virginia. On May 9, 1864, at Cloyd's Mountain, he succeeded to command after the death of Brigadier General Albert G. Jenkins; his brigadier's commission came 9 days later. He led cavalry for the remainder of the war, serving under Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early, in the Shenandoah Valley. He went with Early to the outskirts of Washington D.C., and fought well at Monocacy on the way. He is best remembered for a July 1864 raid into Pennsylvania, where acting under orders, he demanded $100,000 in gold from the citizens of Chambersburg in retribution for destruction of private homes in the valley by Union Major General David Hunter. When the town merchants refused to pay, he evacuated Chambersburg's residents and set fire to the business district. He then fought at Third Winchester, Fisher's Hill, and Cedar Creek. During the final fighting he was with General Robert E. Lee, he cut his way through the Federal lines at Appomattox rather than surrender. A few days later he disbanded his men. He then went to Europe, Canada, and Mexico to avoid arraignment for the Chambersburg fire. Though formally charged with arson, President Grant intervened on his behalf. Having returned to the United States in 1867, he acquired 6,000 acres in Mason City, West Virginia. There, in self-imposed isolation, he spent the rest of his life. In 1919, the United States Congress officially restored his citizenship. He was the next-to-last Confederate general to die. He died an "unreconstructed" rebel who once commented at the thought of his sons becoming soldiers, "I rather see my boys dead, than to wear the blue uniform." (bio by: Ugaalltheway)

                        Thomas T. Munford, Class of 1852

                          Biographical Information

                          Early Life
                          Thomas Taylor Munford, born March 29, 1831 at Richmond, Virginia. Parents: George Wythe Munford and Lucy Singleton Taylor.

                          VMI record
                          Enrolled at VMI on July 30, 1849; was graduated in July 1854, standing 14th in a class of 24.

                          Marriage
                          1st- In 1853, Henrietta Tayloe (died 1863)
                          2nd- In 1866, Emma Tayloe

                          Pre-Civil War
                          Cotton planter in Mississippi; farmer in Bedford Co. VA.

                          Civil War
                          Lt. Col., 13th Virginia Mounted Infantry; Col., 2nd Virginia Cavalry; in the Shenandoah Valley served under Jackson, succeeded Turner Ashby, fought at Cross Keys, Harrisonburg, White Oak Swamp, 2nd Manassas, Antietam; appointed Brigadier General November 1864; took command of Fitzhugh Lee's division and fought at Five Forks, High Bridge, Sayler's Creek, and Appomattox.

                          Post-war
                          Iron manufacturer and farmer; President, VMI Board of Visitors, 1884-1888; died February 27, 1918 at the home of his son in Uniontown, Alabama; buried: Spring Hill Cemetery
                          Lynchburg
                          Lynchburg city
                          Virginia, USA

                          William H. Payne, Class of 1849

                            Biographical Information

                            Early Life
                            William Henry Fitzhugh Payne, born January 27, 1830, Fauquier Co., Virginia; Parents: Arthur Alexander Morson Payne and Mary Conway Mason Fitzhugh.

                            VMI record
                            Enrolled at VMI on August 12, 1846; he was a cadet for only one year; declared an honorary graduate by the Board of Visitors in 1873.

                            Marriage
                            In 1852, Mary Elizabeth Winston Payne (cousin); they had 10 children; a son Harry F., attended VMI as a member of the class of 1877.

                            Pre-Civil War
                            Studied law at the University of Virginia; began law practice in Warrenton, Virginia in 1851; Commonwealth's Attorney of Fauquier Co.

                            Civil War
                            Capt., Black Horse Cavalry; Major, 4th Virginia Cavalry; commanded regiment at Williamsburg, where he was severely wounded and captured; exchanged and returned to duty as Lt. Col., 2d North Carolina Cavalry; led 2d NC at Chancellorsville; captured during Stuart's Pennsylvania raid and imprisoned at Johnson's Island; exchanged and appointed Brigadier General November 1864; served in Valley under Early; during final operations around Richmond commanded brigade under Munford.

                            Post-war
                            Resumed law practice; general counsel for the Southern Railway Co.; died March 29, 1904 in Washington, DC.

                            Buried: Warrenton Cemetery
                            Warrenton
                            Fauquier County
                            Virginia, USA

                            Robert E. Rodes, Class of 1848

                              Biographical Information

                              Early Life
                              Robert Emmet Rodes, born Lynchburg, Virginia, on March 30, 1829; son of General David Rodes and Martha Yancey.

                              VMI record
                              was graduated from the Virginia Military Institute in July 1848, standing 10th in a class of 24 graduates; Assistant Professor (Physical Science, Chemistry, Tactics) at VMI, 1848-1850.

                              Marriage
                              In September 1857 married Virginia Hortense Woodruff (1833-1907), of Tuscaloosa, Alabama. 2 children: Robert Emmet Rodes, Jr. (1863-1925) and a daughter, Bell Yancey Rodes (1865-1931).

                              Pre-Civil War
                              In 1850 began Civil Engineering career, working on various railroad projects in Alabama and elsewhere in the south; in 1860 was elected Professor of Applied Mechanics at VMI, but never served in this capacity because of the outbreak of war.

                              Civil War
                              May 1861 was commissioned Col. 5th Alabama Infantry Regt; Oct 1861 appointed Brigadier General, commanding his brigade at Fair Oaks, Gaines's Mill, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville; promoted Major General May 1863; led his division at Gettysburg, the Wilderness, and Spotsylvania; went to Shenandoah Valley in June 1864, where he served under Early and fought at Kernstown and elsewhere; killed at Winchester, VA, on 19 September 1864; buried: Presbyterian Cemetery
                              Lynchburg
                              Lynchburg city
                              Virginia, USA

                              James E. Slaughter, Class of 1848

                                Biographical Information

                                Early Life
                                James Edwin Slaughter, born 1827, Culpeper Co., Virginia. Parents: Daniel French Slaughter and Letitia Madison. Grandparents: Philip Slaughter/Margaret French Strother; William Madison/Frances Throckmorton.

                                VMI record
                                Enrolled on August 6, 1845 and resigned on July 6, 1846.

                                Marriage
                                Never married

                                Pre-Civil War
                                Served in United States Army from 1847 until outbreak of Civil War, when he resigned to join Confederate Army.

                                Civil War
                                1861 appointed 1st Lt. CSA Artillery and served on Beauregard's staff in Alabama and Florida; appointed Brigadier General in March 1862; on staff of Gen. Bragg in Mississippi and Alabama; 1863 April to Texas as Magruder's Chief of Artillery; remained in Texas until end of war; he went to Mexico after Lee's surrender.

                                Post-war
                                Civil Engineer; lived in Mexico for several years and then returned to live in Mobile, Alabama and subsequently in New Orleans, LA; died in Mexico City on January 1, 1901 and was buried: U.S. National Cemetery
                                Mexico
                                Distrito Federal, Mexico

                                James B. Terrill, Class of 1858

                                  Biographical Information

                                  Early Life
                                  James Barbour Terrill, born February 20, 1838, Bath County, Virginia. Parents: William H. Terrill, a lawyer, and Elizabeth Pitzer.

                                  VMI record
                                  Enrolled at VMI on October 18, 1854; was graduated on July 5, 1858, standing 16th in a class of 19.

                                  Marriage
                                  Charlotte Eucebia Drewry (Drury) of Chesterfield Co., in late 1861 or early 1862. Issue: James Mercer Terrill (b. October 31, 1862; died around age 18) and Emily Barbour Terrill (b. 1864 d. 1943. Emily married Henry Heth Vaden.

                                  Pre-Civil War
                                  Studied law at Washington College in Lexington, Virginia under Judge John W. Brockenbrough; practiced law in Bath County,Virginia. Appointed Major, Cavalry, in 1859 by Gov. Henry A. Wise.

                                  Civil War
                                  Major and Lt. Col., 13th Virginia Infantry Regiment; Brigadier General, May 30, 1864; battles included the Shenandoah Valley campaign, Gaines's Mill, White Oak Swamp, Malvern Hill, Cedar Mountain, Fredericksburg, Wilderness, Spotsylvania; killed in battled on May 30, 1864, near Bethesda Church, Hanover County,Virginia; his nomination as BG was confirmed on the day he was killed. Full text 1861 Terrill letter

                                  "Brother against Brother": William Rufus Terrill, James's brother, was an 1853 West Point graduate who served as a Brigadier General in the Union army during the war. He was also killed in battle, at Perryville, KY, in October 1862.

                                  William R. Terry, Class of 1850

                                    Biographical Information

                                    Early Life
                                    William Richard Terry, born March 12, 1827 at Liberty (now Bedford), Virginia. Parents: William Terry of Bedford County and Lettie Johnson of Pittsylvania Co.

                                    VMI record
                                    Entered VMI on July 27, 1846 and was graduated on July 4, 1850, standing 15th in a class of 17.

                                    Marriage
                                    Mary Adelaide Pemberton (died 1910) in 1856; they had 3 sons and 3 daughters.

                                    Pre-Civil War
                                    Attended University of Virginia; subsequently a merchant.

                                    Civil War
                                    Raised Cavalry company in Bedford, 1861; Col., 24th Virginia Cavalry; 1862- commanded Kemper's Brigade, Kemper's Division, 1st Corps, Army of Northern Virginia; 1863-1864- commanded Kemper's Brigade, Dept. of North Carolina and Dept. of Richmond; wounded at Gettysburg; appointed Brigadier General, May 1864; commanded Kemper's (old) Brigade, Pickett's Div., 1st Corps, Army of Northern VA; at Cold Harbor and Petersburg.

                                    Post-war
                                    State legislator, prison superintendent, in charge of a soldiers' home; died Bedford Co., Virginia on March 29, 1897.

                                    Died: Mar. 28, 1897

                                    Buried: Hollywood Cemetery
                                    Richmond
                                    Richmond city
                                    Virginia, USA

                                    Civil War Confederate Brigadier General. He was born in Liberty, Virginia, and was an 1850 graduate of the Virginia Military Institute; he then graduated from the University of Virginia. He farmed and became a merchant until the beginning of the Civil War. When Virginia seceded, he joined the Confederacy with the rank of Captain of a company of cavalry. He fought so bravely at First Bull Run on July 21, 1861, that his performance earned him a promotion in September to Colonel and command of the 24th Virginia. He led his regiment in the 1862 Peninsula Campaign. At Williamsburg, Virginia, on May 5, he suffered the first of 7 combat wounds. Returning to duty after the Seven Days' Campaign, he led the 24th at Second Bull Run late in August, then temporarily commanded the brigade of Brigadier General James L. Kemper of Major General George E. Pickett's division. He resumed command of his regiment in 1863. At Gettysburg, on July 3, he fell in Pickett's Charge against the Union center. Kemper was grievously wounded in the assault, and he subsequently replaced the Brigadier General. Early in 1864 Pickett's division was sent to the Department of North Carolina and Southern Virginia, where it participated in operations against New Berne, North Carolina. After receiving his commission as Brigadier General on May 31, 1864, he led his brigade in the Petersburg Campaign. At Dinwiddie Court House, Virginia, on March 31, 1865, he was wounded for the final time but stayed with the army until its surrender at Appomattox. After the war, he served for 8 years as a Virginia state senator, then as superintendent of the Confederate Soldiers' Home in Richmond, Virginia; later dying in that city. (bio by: Ugaalltheway)

                                    Alfred J. Vaughan, Class of 1851

                                      Biographical Information

                                      Early Life
                                      Alfred Jefferson Vaughan, Jr., born May 10, 1830, in Dinwiddie County, Virginia. Parents: Alfred Jefferson Vaughan and Dorothy (nee) Vaughan.

                                      VMI record
                                      Enrolled at VMI on July 17, 1848; was graduated on July 4, 1851, standing 15th in a class of 29; in his final year at VMI he was a cadet captain and company commander.

                                      Marriage
                                      Martha Jane Hardaway (1838-1911) in 1856; they had 8 children (Mary Virginia, Mary Eliza, Lucy, Alfred J., Jr., Samuel, Willie, infant, ___ Franklin).

                                      Pre-Civil War
                                      Civil Engineer in Missouri, California, and Mississippi. When the war began he was living in Marshall Co., Mississippi.

                                      Civil War
                                      Capt., Lt. Col. and Col. of the 13th Tennessee Infantry Regt.; commissioned Brigadier General, 1863 (Army of Tennessee); led brigade at Missionary Ridge and Atlanta campaign until Vining's Station (4 July 1864), where he was severely wounded (lost leg).

                                      Post-war
                                      Farmer in Mississippi; businessman; general agent of the National Grange, organizing state granges of Mississippi, Arkansas, and Tennessee; clerk of court of Shelby Co., TN; died in Indianapolis, IN on October 1, 1899; buried: Elmwood Cemetery
                                      Memphis
                                      Shelby County
                                      Tennessee, USA
                                      Plot: South Grove Section, Lot 360-361

                                      James A. Walker, Class of 1852

                                        Biographical Information

                                        Early Life
                                        James Alexander Walker, born August 27, 1832, Augusta Co., Virginia. Parents: Alexander Walker and Hannah Hinton. Paternal grandparents: John Walker and Elizabeth Connelly. Maternal grandparents: Benjamin Hinton and Sarah Hopkins.

                                        VMI record
                                        Entered VMI on August 23, 1848; court-martialed and dismissed May 1852, for disobedience in the classroom of Maj. Thomas J. (Stonewall) Jackson; he subsequently challenged Jackson to a duel; granted honorary degree in 1872 in recognition of his war career.

                                        Marriage
                                        In 1858, Sarah A. Poague [Poage] of Augusta Co., Virginia. They had six children.

                                        Pre-Civil War
                                        Studied law at the University of Virginia (1854-1855) and began the practice of law in Newbern, Pulaski Co., Virginia. Elected Commonwealth's Attorney for Pulaski Co. in 1860.

                                        Civil War
                                        Organized Pulaski Guards which became Co. C of the 4th Virginia Infantry; commissioned Lt. Col. 13th Virginia Infantry; Promoted to Brigadier General in the Stonewall Brigade in May 1863; severely wounded at Spotsylvania Court House on May 12, 1864; in Jan. 1865 was assigned to Early's Division.

                                        Post-war
                                        Resumed law practice in Newbern; active in local and state politics; served two terms in state legislature; 1877 elected Lieutenant Governor of Virginia, serving until 1881; 1895-1899 served in U.S. Congress; died at Wytheville, Virginia on October 20, 1901.

                                        Buried: East End Cemetery
                                        Wytheville
                                        Wythe County
                                        Virginia, USA

                                        Civil War Confederate Brigadier General, US Congressman. He was born at Mount Sidney, Virginia, and received his early education at private schools; later attending the Virginia Military Institute. During his senior year there, he was dismissed on charges preferred by a professor, his future commander, Thomas J. "Stonewall" Jackson. Although the cadet challenged Jackson to a duel, the two did not meet. He then worked for the Carrington and Ohio Railway before studying law at the University of Virginia. Following his graduation, he practiced his profession in Pulaski County, Virginia. When Virginia seceded, he entered Confederate service as Captain of the Pulaski Guard. He initially served under Jackson at Harpers Ferry, Virginia, then became Lieutenant Colonel of the 13th Virginia. In February 1862 he succeeded Brigadier General Ambrose Powell Hill as Colonel of the regiment, leading it in the 1862 Shenandoah Valley, Seven Days', and Second Bull Run Campaigns. A skillful, ferocious combat officer, he commanded a brigade at Antietam, where he suffered a wound. He commanded another brigade at Fredericksburg in December 1862 and at Chancellorsville in May 1863. His prowess as an officer so impressed Jackson that "Stonewall" specially requested his promotion to Brigadier General. He received his commission, and command of the Stonewall Brigade, which he led at Gettysburg, Bristoe, Mine Run, the Wilderness, and Spotsylvania. In this last battle, the brigade was mowed down and he was grievously wounded. On his return to duty, he commanded a division at Petersburg, and at Appomattox. After the war, he returned to Pulaski County, where he farmed and resumed his legal practice. He was elected to the state legislature as a Democrat in 1871. The following year, the Virginia Military Institute granted him an honorary degree, in recognition of his war career and listed him on the rolls as a graduate of the Institute. He became Lieutenant Governor of Virginia in 1876. He eventually split with the Democratic party and, as a Republican, served 2 terms in the United States House of Representatives. Ironically, his great grandson Manley C. Butler, would years later also serve in the Congress. He later would die in Wytheville, Virginia. (bio by: Ugaalltheway)

                                        Reuben Lindsay Walker, Class of 1845

                                          Biographical Information

                                          Early Life
                                          Reuben Lindsay Walker, born Albemarle County, Virginia on May 29, 1827.

                                          VMI record
                                          Entered VMI on September 5, 1842 and was graduated on July 4, 1845, standing 19th in a class of 20.

                                          Pre-Civil War
                                          After graduating was a civil engineer and farmer; was engaged in farming in New Kent Co., Virginia when Civil War broke out.

                                          Marriage
                                          married (1st) Maria Eskridge (d. 1854 leaving four sons) (2nd) Sally Elam, in 1857

                                          Civil War
                                          Commissioned Captain, Purcell artillery battery, in 1861; promoted to Major in March 1862 and appointed A.P. Hill's Chief of Artillery; he served with Hill until the end of the war; promoted Lt. Col., Col., and finally (in Feb. 1865) Brigadier General.

                                          Post-Civil War
                                          Farmer and civil engineer; died at his residence at Point of Fork, Virginia on June 7, 1890; buried: Hollywood Cemetery
                                          Richmond
                                          Richmond city
                                          Virginia, USA

                                          Gabriel C. Wharton, Class of 1847

                                            Biographical Information

                                            Early Life
                                            Gabriel Colvin Wharton, born July 23,1824, Culpeper, Virginia.

                                            VMI record
                                            Enrolled at VMI on September 1, 1845; was graduated on July 5, 1847, standing 2nd in a class of 12 (distinguished graduate).

                                            Marriage
                                            Married Nannie Radford in 1863. One son, William.

                                            Pre-Civil War
                                            Civil Engineer in west (Arizona and elsewhere).

                                            Civil War
                                            Colonel, 51st Virginia Infantry Regiment; served in Floyd's western Virginia campaign; appointed Brigadier General Sept. 1863; commanded brigade guarding railroads in southwestern Virginia; fought at New Market, Cold Harbor, and in Valley campaign.

                                            Post-war
                                            Civil Engineer in southwestern Virginia; instrumental in building railroad in New River Valley; died May 11, 1906 at Radford, Virginia; buried: Johnson Family Cemetery
                                            Radford (Radford City County)
                                            Rockbridge County
                                            Virginia, USA

                                            Brigadier General, Confederate States Army, Virginia State Legislator. He was born in Culpeper City, Virginia, and attended the Virginia Military Institute where he graduated 2nd in the class of 1847. Becoming a civil engineer, he went to the Southwest where he invested in mining and worked in western New Mexico Territory. Upon returning to Virginia, he enlisted in the 45th Virginia Infantry and was elected Major in July 1861. He soon transfered to the 51st Virginia, which elected him its Colonel in August of that year. The 51st was attached to Brigadier General John B. Floyd's Army of the Kanawha and saw action in southwestern Virginia. They were later sent West to serve with Floyd's Fort Donelson garrison in Tennessee. There he commanded Floyd's 1st Brigade, which was made up of the 51st, and the 56th Virginia. When surrender was certain he escaped with most of his men on February 16, 1862. He served briefly at Nashville, Tennessee, returning with the 51st back to southwestern Virginia, there serving under Major General Samuel Jones through the autumn of 1863. He was promoted to Brigadier General on July 8, 1863, and briefly assumed command of the Shenandoah Valley District. During the Chickamauga Campaign he set up headquarters at Dublin Depot, Virginia, and from here went on a diversionary mission against Union targets in East Tennessee. As part of Major General Robert Ransom's division, attached to Lieutenant General James Longstreet's I Corps for the Knoxville Campaign, he led Wharton's Brigade of Sharpshooters, made up of the 30th, 45th, and 51st Virginia Infantry regiments. Returning once again to southwest Virginia in the Spring of 1864, he fought with Major General John Breckinridge and helped to defeat Union forces led by Franz Sigel at the Battle of New Market. He joined General Robert E. Lee at Cold Harbor, and was part of the relief force that arrived in time to save Lynchburg. He immediately returned back to the Shenandoah Valley, where he pursued the forces of Union Major General David Hunter. He advanced into Maryland with Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early, seeing action at Monocacy and on the outskirts of Washington D.C. He was given divisional command and helped Early, in autumn 1864, oppose Union Major General Philip H. Sheridan at Winchester, Cedar Creek, and Fisher's Hill. He was with Early once more at Waynesboro on March 2, 1865, where he saw his command and division disintegrate. He was paroled on June 21, 1865, at Lynchburg. After the war, he returned to civil and mine engineering and helped develop Virginia mines. Later he served in the Virginia state house from 1871 to 1874 and once again from 1897 to 1898. He then retired from public life dying at his home in Radford, Virginia. (bio by: Ugaalltheway)