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Registro Central de Esclavos

Registro Central de Esclavos

Overview Description

These 1872 schedules, written in Spanish, resulted from "ley Moret," an 1870 law granting freedom to certain slaves in Puerto Rico. Slaves are listed under the department and then under the municipality in which they resided. Information for each slave may include name, country of origin, present residence, name of parents, sex, marital status, trade, age, physical description, and master's name.

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Source

Publication Title:
Registro Central de Esclavos
Content Source:
The National Archives logo The National Archives
Publication Number:
T1121
Record Group:
186
Published on Fold3:
Last Update:
June 29, 2009
Description:
NARA T1121. Slave schedules from among the Records of the Spanish Governors of Puerto Rico, 1872.

Description

The information below is taken directly from the descriptive pamphlet (DP) created by NARA for this title, Registro Central de Esclavos, T1121. The PDF version of the DP can be viewed or downloaded from this link.


Background

By the Treaty of Paris of December 10, 1898, Spain ceded Puerto Rico to the United States. The cession included Spanish rights to the official archives and records on the islands, which the United States agreed to preserve and make available for use.

The fragmentary correspondence and related executive records received or created by the Spanish governors of Puerto Rico were transferred to the National Archives in 1943. A joint resolution of August 21, 1957, authorized the return of the Puerto Rican archives in the National Archives to the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico.

This title from the Records of the Spanish Governors of Puerto Rico (RG 186).


Using the collection

This microfilm publication reproduces the 1872 Puerto Rican Registro Central de Esclavos. On June 4, 1870, a law known as the ley Moret was approved, granting freedom to certain categories of slaves, including those over age 60, those belonging to the state, and children of slaves born after Sept. 17, 1868. The law also resulted in the preparation of a central register of slaves. There are now eight volumes of this register, which cover geographical departments 1, 2, and 4 through 6. Slaves are listed under the department and thereunder the municipality in which they resided. The following information is usually given for each slave: name, country of origin, present residence, name of parents, sex, marital status, trade, age, physical description, and master's name. The schedules are in Spanish.


Contents

The contents of the eight rolls of microfilm from which the images were taken are:

  1. Departmento (District) I. Dorado, Maranjito, TrujiUo Alto, Trujillo Bajo, the Capital (San Juan)
  2. Departmento (District) II, Arecibo, Camuy, Ciales, Hatillo, Manati Morovis, Quebzadillas, Utuado
  3. Deportmento (District) IV (pt.), Anasco, Cabo Rojo, Mayaguez (pt.)
  4. Mayaguez (pat.), Sabana Grande, San German
  5. Departmento (District) V (pt.) Adjuntas, Barros, Coamo, Guayanilla, ]uana Diaz, Penuelas, Yauco
  6. Barranquitas, Ponce
  7. Deportmento (District) VI (pt.), Arroyo, Cidra (pt.), Guayama
  8. Aquas Buenas, Caguas, Cayey, Cidra (pt.) Gurabo, Hato Grande (San Lorenzo), Sabana del Palmar (Comerio), Salinas