VICTOR CHAPMAN

VICTOR CHAPMAN - Stories

World War I

Sgt Victor Emmanuel Chapman

    Sgt Victor Emmanuel Chapman

    Birth:  Apr. 17, 1890
    New York
    New York County (Manhattan)
    New York, USA Death:  Jun. 23, 1916
    Meuse
    Champagne-Ardenne, France


    World War I American Aviator. Following his graduation from Harvard in 1913, he became a student of architecture at the college of Beaux Arts in Paris, France. With the outbreak of World War I, he enlisted into the Foreign Legion and was fighting in the trenches of the Somme, by the end of 1914. In August 1915, he transferred to the French Aviation Service, entered the school of military aviation at Avold and was brevetted a pilot in January 1916. He then was assigned to the Escadrille Lafayette at Luxeuil, promoted to Sergeant and saw his first aerial combat over Verdun, a short time later. He was wounded by a machine-gun bullet to the head during aerial combat with four German air machines on June 17, 1916 and after being treated he continued to fly with a heavily bandaged head. On June 23, 1916, he engaged in attacking a numerically superior German force over the Meuse-Argonne, France and due to damage to his aircraft, he crashed into the ground at full speed behind the German lines. He was killed instantly and was officially classified as being the first American aviator to die in action. (bio by:John "J-Cat" Griffith)

    Family links: 
     Parents:
      John Jay Chapman (1862 - 1933)
      Minna Elisa Timmins Chapman (1861 - 1897)

    Siblings:
      Victor Emmanuel Chapman (1890 - 1916)*
      Victor Emmanuel Chapman (1890 - 1916)
      Conrad Chapman (1896 - 1989)*
      Chanler Chapman (1901 - 1982)**

    *Calculated relationship
    **Half-sibling   Burial:
    Meuse-Argonne American Cemetery and Memorial
    Romagne-sous-Montfaucon
    Departement de la Meuse
    Lorraine, France
    Plot: Plot D, Row 1, Grave 33

    Sgt Victor Emmanuel Chapman

      Victor Emmanuel Chapman, son of John Jay and Minna E.Timmins.

      The U.S. Army Signal Corp's Cutler Aerial Gunnery Field had been renamed for Victor Emmanuel Chapman. This field was a agricultural and horticultural station going back to the early 1900's.

      It was near Miami, Florida and in 1972 was known as the Subtropical Horticulture Research Station.

      Victor Emmanuel Chapman, the first American aviator to be killed in France in World War I. He was shot down while delivering fruit to an injured member of the squadron. A body presumed to be that of Chapman was recovered after the war, but dental recordes didn't match, neartheless, the body was placed in a grave under his name in the American Cemetery at Suresness. The remains in that grave were not removed to a memorial to the Lafayette Escadrille built at Villeneuve Park in St. Cloud outside Paris and the crypt bearing Chapman's name remains empty.

      SOURCE: A portion of the above information was found at;A Century of Research with USDA in MiamiPro. Fla. State Hort. Soc. 1999R.G. McGuire, R.J. Schnell and W.P. Gould.V. E. ChapmanSergeant, U.S. ArmyLafayette EscadrilleEntered the Service from: New YorkDied: June 16, 1916Buried at: Plot D Row 1 Grave 33Meuse-Argonne American Cemtery, Romagne, FranceAwards: French Medaille Millitaire and French Croix de GuerreSource: American Battle Monuments CommissionWorld War I Honor RollGreat-hearted, loyal, reckless for a friend;Not counting risks, cool handed, clear of sight,He gave himself to serve a lofty end,And like an eagle soaring in the light,On wings unruffled by the wind's chance breath,He sought, and seeks his goal with steadfast flight,--Victor, indeed, in name, in life, in death!John Heard, Jr.SOURCE: Victor Chapman's Letters from France, with memoir by John J. Chapman. Macmillan Co., New York1917page 2The Memorial Church, Harvard UniversilyWorld War I MemorialVictor Emmanuel ChapmanClass of 1913Victor ChapmanIt is not true he died in France;His spirit climbs the serried yearsVictorious over empty fearsAnd proof of Freedom's last advance.The handful of his mortal clayMay drift upon a foreign breezeTo burgeon in to flowers and treesThat make the diadem of May.Himself still lives, and cannot dieWhile freemen shun the tyrant's heel,While minds are true and hearts are leal,And men look upward to the sky.Compact of elemental fireAnd heart untouched by easy fear,His vision measures fair and clearThe worth of ultimate desire.For him no blight of searing age;Eternal youth is his and joy--The cheerful gladnesss of the boyShall be his constant heritage.Mourn not for that devoted head;He is the spirit of our raceTriumphant over Time and Space__He cannot die; he is not dead.Benjamin Apthorp GouldSOURCE: Victor Chapman's Letters from France, with memoir by John J. Chapman. Macmillan Co., New York1917

      Sgt Victor Emmanuel Chapman

        LM 8577 Sgt Victor Emmanuel Chapman, Escadrille Lafayette.

        Born in New York on 17 April 1890, Victor was a Harvard graduate of 1913. Following graduation, he became a student of architecture at the college of Beaux Arts in Paris, but left France for London at the outbreak of war. After a change of heart, he returned to France and, by the end of August 1914, had enlisted into the Foreign Legion at one of their Parisian recruiting offices; by Christmas 1914 he was in the trenches of the Somme.

        Service in the Vosges followed, before Victor decided to transfer to the French Aviation Service on 1 August 1915. Assigned to Escadrille VB 108, he entered the school of military aviation at Avold on 26 September and was brevetted a pilot in January 1916. In April, he was transferred to the Escadrille Lafayette at Luxeuil and promoted to Sergeant before seeing his first (aerial) action over Verdun a short time later. Victor was wounded by a machine-gun bullet to the head during aerial combat with four German machines on 17 June 1916, but he continued to fly and, with a heavily bandaged head, was engaged in attacking a numerically superior German force over Douaumont on 23 June. Unfortunately, possibly due to damage to his aircraft, Victor was unable to pull out of a dive and crashed into the ground at full speed behind the German lines. He was killed instantly. Initially buried by the Germans, Victor's body was recovered post-war and his remains now lie in the Meuse-Argonne American Cemetery at Romagne. He is classified as being the first American aviator to die in action.

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        Sgt Victor Emmanuel Chapman

          Sgt Victor Emmanuel Chapman