Summary

Founding father of the United States of America.

Conflict Period:
Revolutionary War 1
Branch:
Militia 1
Birth:
27 Sep 1722 1
Boston, Massachusetts 1
Death:
02 Oct 1803 1
Massachusetts 1
More…

Related Pages

+
View more similar pages

Pictures & Records (4)

Add Show More

Personal Details

Edit
Full Name:
Samuel Adams 2
Also known as:
Sam Adams 2
Birth:
27 Sep 1722 2
Boston, Massachusetts 2
Male 2
Death:
02 Oct 1803 2
Massachusetts 2
Edit
Birth:
Mother: Mary Fifield Adams 2
Father: Samuel Adams, Sr. 2
Marriage:
Elizabeth Wells 2
1764 2
Marriage:
Elizabeth Checkley 2
October 1749 2
Spouse Death Date: July 1757 2
Edit

Revolutionary War 1

Branch:
Militia 1
Edit
Occupation:
Politician 2
Religion:
Puritan 2
Employment:
Employer: Boston Town Meeting 2
Position: Tax collector 2
Start Date: 1756 2
Education:
Institution: Harvard College 2
Place: Cambridge, Massachusetts 2
From: 1736 2
To: 1743 2
Appointed to Board of War:
1777 2
Became acting Governor of Massechusetts:
1793 2
Delegate in the First Continental Congress:
September 1774 2
Delegate in the Second Continental Congress:
May 1775 2
Draft MA Constitution w/ John Adams & Jas. Bowdoin:
1779 2
Drafted Articles of Confederation:
1777 2
Elected Lieutenant Governor of Massechusetts:
1789 2
Reelected to MA House of Reps:
May 1773 2
Reelected to MA House of Reps:
April 1772 2
Reelected to MA House of Reps as clerk:
May 1766 2
Retired from Continental Congress:
1781 2
Retired from politics:
1797 2

Looking for more information about Samuel Adams?

Search through millions of records to find out more.

Sources

  1. Contributed by Year_Test
  2. Contributed by Fold3_Pages
Add

Stories

Although Adams was a controversial figure in American history, he had the passion to help push the nation to independence by signing the Declaration of Independence on 4 July 1776. Adams helped draft the Articles of Confederation as well as the Massachussetts Constitution. Afterward, he served in the state senate.

Boston Tea Party

On the evening of December 16, 1773, a group of colonists boarded three ships in Boston and threw their cargo of tea into the harbor. Although Adams role in organizing the Boston Tea Party is disputed, he openly opposed the Tea Act and led a meeting of 7,000 people on the day of the Tea Party. After the dumping of the tea occured, Adams publically defended the colonists' actions.

About this Memorial Page

×