Summary

Birth:
30 Sep 1839 1
Sep 1839 1
Jackson, Susquehanna, Pennsylvania 1
Death:
17 Oct 1862 1
Fort Delaware, New Castle, Delaware 1
Conflict Period:
Civil War (Union) 1
Branch:
Army 1
Rank:
1st Lieutenant 1
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Personal Details

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Birth:
30 Sep 1839 1
Sep 1839 2
Jackson, Susquehanna, Pennsylvania 2
Male 2
Death:
17 Oct 1862 2
Fort Delaware, New Castle, Delaware 2
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Birth:
Mother: Ezoa Page 2
Father: Griffin Cook 2
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Civil War (Union) 1

Branch:
Army 1
Rank:
1st Lieutenant 1
Service Start Date:
26 Aug 1862 1
Service End Date:
17 Oct 1862 1

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Stories

THE OBITUARY OF LIEUTENANT U. S. COOK

THE PITTSTON GAZETTE

November 6, 1862

   Lieut. U. S. Cook is no more. He, from whom the educational interests of this and surrounding vincinity are much indebted, has taken his last farewell, no more to pursue his instructive vocation, no more to promote and extend the Common School System, no more to advance the youthful minds of the present generation in the flowery paths of literature, for which he was so very remarkably fitted, and no more to be the pillar and guiding star of society.

   The subject of our obituary was born of respectable parents in the town of Jackson, Susquehanna County, Pa., on the 30th day of Sept., 1839. The earlier portion of his life was devoted to the pursuits of agriculture, except when pursuing his various studies.

   At the age of 17 he took upon himself a teacher's responsibilities, and by close application to his most important, duties his success in the channel of instruction has been unequalled perhaps by any in his native county. During the six years which intervened between his first entrances into this great drama, the teacher's arena, and the expiration of the same, he has discharged the obligations which devolved upon him with honor to himself and credit to his parents. He was an unassuming young man; affable in his manners, polite in his conversation, impartial in his nature, and majestic in his intellect. He gained by his many and noble qualities the pride and admiration of all with whom he came in contact. He experience in this place is too well known to need publication now, suffice it to say that he came here almost a stranger, and by his industrial and perservering talent soon gained a teacher's renown, to which he was justly entitled. Subsequently, he became Principal of the Hyde School Graded School, which position he filled creditably and successfully to all concerned. Shortly after, by the request of many of his former scholors of Pittston, he again cast his lot among the studies he loved, formed a High School and replenished it with all the articles neccessary to its physical perfection, and assumed full charge of this position, and has done more in the same period towards the development and progress of all who came under his characterizing manner of making an indellible impression (intellectually speaking) than any other teacher in this vincinity.

   I do not base this assertation upon my own idea, but upon the opinion of nearly all who take a deep interest in the just merits of good insructors. At one of the late calls of the Persident for reinforcements, he rallied his friends around him and went forth to protect the constitution of this Country, and one of his last patriotic sentiments before leaving was: " When I die I want no loftier sentiment written on the tombstone that marks my resting place, than I lived and died for my Country." Ah, there is a voice from the tomb sweeter than song! There is a hallowed influence to which we turn even from the homes of the living!

   It is impossible to describe the irreparable loss which his most intimate relations suffer in the death of him who was taken away amidst his noble aspirations and ambition for true eminence. He died of Typhoid fever at Fort Deleware on October 17th of October, in the 23rd year of his age, a sacrifice at the alter of his Country. We sympathize with his mourning relatives in their sad misfortune, and trust that he has obtained a happier reward. Truly,

"All that's bright must fade,

The brightest still the fleetest;

All that's sweet was made-

But to be lost when sweetest."

J. M. R.

Pittston - Nov. 3, '62

The death of Urbane S Cook

OCTOBER 30, 1862

THE DEATH OF LIEUT. U. S. COOK

   Lieut. Cook was connected with Schooley's Battery; he was well known and universally esteemed in this community, where he had for several years been a resident, his death therefore brings a sorrow to us all. His constitution was of rather a delicate cast, but his patriotism bore him above physical weakness. He was taken with typhoid fever and congestion of the lungs, induced perhaps by his vigorous exertions in raising the Company, and died at Fort Deleware, on Friday, the 17th inst., after a painful and tedious illness. His furneral sermon was preached in the Methodist church in Deleware City, on Saturday, the 18th inst., at 4:00 P. His body was then lowered in the grave in military honors and afterwards taken up and laid in state in the Church, with a guard of honor placed around the building. The next morning he was conveyed on board a steam boat to Philadelphia in charge of Lieut. Wm. Gee, who accomodated him to his former home in Susquehanna County.

   He was an efficient and diligent officer, and enjoyed the respect and confidence of the men. To die in camp, we know was not to his taste, for he enlisted to do battle against the enemies of his country, and if death was to be met, he would have chosen to meet it on the field of battle. We will cherish his memory as one who has died at the alter of his country.

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