Noyes Family

Noyes Family - Stories

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noyes family

  • MA

<a name="I33610"></a>Noyes, John (1720 - 1770) - male b. 20 APR 1720 in Abington, Plymouth, Massachusetts
d. 30 MAY 1770 in Pembroke, Merrimack, New Hampshire

father: Noyes, Samuel (1691 - 1729)
mother: Poore, Hannah (1692 - ) The Poore genealogy erroneously states that Joseph Noyes married Abigail, daughter of Benjamin and Elizabeth Poore. The records of Rowley say that John Noyes of Haverhill married Abigail Poore of Rowley, 11 Jun 1741. The history of Pembroke says that John, son of Samuel and Hannah (Poore) Noyes, of Abington married Abigail Poor. After the death of his father, his uncle Samuel Poor of Rowley was appointed his guardian, 1736. He settled in Pembroke, at what was then called the "Ox Bow". After his death, his son Benjamin was appointed administrator of his estate, which consisted of the home in Bow, valued at £115; an island in the Merrimac River, £9; house and farm in Pembroke, £170; personal property £92. He was the progenitor of the largest branch of the family from the fourth generation, having eight sons, who had seventy-five children. It has been said that Moses, their seventh son, married and lived in Bow, N.H., had four sons, and that he was drowned in the Merrimac River. No known descendents have been traced.

John was 9 years old when his father died. John left Abington and was sent to live in Rowley with his uncle Samuel Poor (Hen3, John2) who was appointed his guardian. Abigail was John's first cousin. After they married they moved (in the summer of 1742) to Suncook (Pembrook) NH where they were among the first settlers of that town. On 25 Aug 1745 John received a deed (v.32, p.382-4) for 18 acres of land (lot #4) from the Suncook proprietors. John had agreed in 1742 to settle in town and work as a blacksmith for 10 years in return for the land. Up until 1763 John was usually referred to (on deeds) as a blacksmith. He was also called a yeoman (farmer), a physician (1753), a gentleman, an innkeeper (1759) and a Justice of the Peace (Apr 1763). John received a license from the town to run a tavern on 5 Apr 1754. After 1763 he was referred to as Esquire. Suncook was granted by Massachusetts to a group of soldiers on 6 Aug 1728. New Hampshire, which also claimed the land, granted it to a group from Stratham. NH called the town Bow and divided it into lots in 1733. Suncook had been into lots (in 1728) by Massachusetts and was being settled. The lots did not coincide with one another. This led to land disputes for many years after. John bought land from the Bow proprietors in 1758 and 1759 (lots (1-2), (2-20), and (#46) to settle claims against his land. The ownership of the land had been settled in favor NH (Bow) and against Suncook on 5 Mar 1740. NH passed the Bow Act to force the Suncook settlers into compliance. In 1756 John Noyes was chosen (forced) by NH to collect money from them (or he would have to pay). Nobody did anything. NH finally came to terms with the settlers. The area was alternately called Suncook and Bow. Most of the settlements were on the east side of the Merrimack River. John Noyes presented a town petition to the NH General Court in Jan 1757 asking that the land east of the river be renamed Pembrook. This request was granted. The area west of the river became modern Bow. John owned intervale land (riverbank area) on both sides of the Merrimack River. This land was good for farming and grazing and this is what he used the land for. He also owned: 1) at least 11 of the Bow lots, 2) land along the Suncook, Soucook and Turkey Rivers and 3) land in nearby Allenstown, Starkstown, Moblytown, Boscowan and Dunbarton. The intervale lots were about 15 acres each and the Bow lots 40 acres. He had part ownership in a mill on the Turkey River in 1760. John's home lot was near the present center of Pembrook (lot #4 Suncook, (1-7) Bow). His blacksmith shop was probably here also. He lived here (and on lot #34) until 1768, when he was said to have been from either Suncook, Bow or Pembrook (deeds, court records 1745-68). He moved to modern Bow on the west side of the river in 1769, just before his death in 1770. Deeds show that John was a grantee 50 times paying £18,119 and a grantor 17 times receiving L9,700. He seems to have accumulated more land than he sold. This discrepancy is not explained in the inventory of his estate. He bought 50% of lot (1-7) from Simon4 Dearborn (yeoman) of Epping NH on 6 Feb 1759 for £107 10s. John4 McMurphy witnessed a deed (21 Apr 1755) to him for lot #20. Sons Benjamin, Samuel and John were used as witnesses on deeds after 1759. He sold land to his oldest sons: 1) Benjamin (gentleman) - lots #53, #54, 60 acres, on 11 Feb 1764 for £3,000 with 2 houses and a barn, 2) John (yeoman) - lots #47, #48, #49, 60 acres, on 21 Oct 1765 for £90 and 3) Samuel (yeoman) - lot (2-9), 40 acres, on 29 Aug 1768 for £100 with a barn. Wife Abigail cosigned a deed with John on 13 Nov 1767. John appeared on many court records. He was a plaintiff 17 times seeking £1,998 in damages and was sued as a defendant 9 times (for a total of £2,053). John and Abigail had 75 grandchildren. Son Benjamin administered John's estate. On 25 Aug 1770 an inventory was taken. The estate was valued at £386 10s 8p. It consisted of his homestead in Bow, a farm in Pembrook, an island in the Merrimack River and personal property. Some of the animals he owned were: horses, oxen, 6 cows, 2 calves, pigs and 22 sheep. His tools included hoes, spades, a pitch fork, hammers, a grindstone, a loom, a spinning wheel and spools. He owned equipment for farming: yokes, plows, harrows, saddles and bridles. Household items included kitchen utensils, clothes, furniture and bedding. Other items listed were: a large bible, law books, hymn books, a clock, a canoe, tin ware, pewter, a hat and a wig, a writing stand, 4 bells and 10 bottles of liquor.

spouse: Poore, Abigail (1721 - 1814)
- m. 11 JUN 1741 in Rowley, Essex, Massachusetts
----------child: Noyes, Benjamin (1742 - 1811)
----------child: Noyes, John (1744 - 1825)
----------child: Noyes, Samuel (1746 - 1812)

samuel noyes

  • essex MA

<a name="I37289"></a>Noyes, Samuel (1691 - 1729) - male b. 5 FEB 1690/91 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts
d. 6 NOV 1729 in Abington, Plymouth, Massachusetts

father: Noyes, John (1646 - 1692)
mother: Poore, Mary E. (1651 - >1716) Removed to Abington, Mass., with his brother Nicholas in 1712. Although the youngest of the six sons of John, he was the progenitor of more descendants of the name than all the others together; his third son, John, had eight sons and seventy-five grand children, of whom thirty-three were sons who had families. He was elected selectman in 1719 and was town clerk in 1726.

Samuel was from Newbury. He removed to Abington, Mass., with his oldest brother Nicholas in 1712. Samuel and Nicholas lived near each other in the (present) town of West Abington. Nicholas died in 1718. Samuel was elected selectman in 1719 and was town clerk in 1726. He was always referred to as a blacksmith on town deeds. Samuel owned four major tracts of land along the Abington - Bridgewater border. The first tract, the homestead lot, was bought in 2 pieces. The first half (40 acres) was bought from William Reed for £40. The second half (35 acres) was bought on 1 Aug 1726 from the same William Reed for £35. This land in Abington was on the Bridgewater-Weymouth road east of Stream's Swamp in the "Young Mens Shares". Wife Hannah and son Samuel inherited this lot. The second tract, the 50 acre lot, was also bought in 2 pieces. The first half (22.5 acres) was bought on 22 Apr 1720 from Micah Pratt for £40. The second half (30 acres) was bought on 19 Jan 1725-6 from Jacob Reed (Hannah's future husband) for £30. These lots, 66% of lots 23 and 24, strattled the Abington - Bridgewater border, were in the "Old Mens Shares" and were east of Stream's Swamp. This tract was inherited by daughter Abigail and Hannah's unborn child. The third tract, the 100 acre lot, was bought on 20 Sep 1723 from Thomas Snell. This lot was on the same border at the easterly end of lots 16, 17 and 18 in the "Old Mens Shares". The lot was divided between sons John and Daniel on Samuel's death. The fourth tract, the 70 acre sawmill lot, was bought in two pieces. The first half (40 acres) was bought on 19 Oct 1724 from Luke Perkins for £30. The second half (40 acres) was bought from brother Nicholas' wife Sarah (now wife of Nicholas Porter) on 26 Jan 1726-7 for £55. These lots were on the Abington-Bridgewater border in the 4th division of lands. Samuel owned (1 Feb 1722) part interest in a forge (Packard's), a dam, a building, timber and 50% interest in the sawmill on Beaver Brook on this lot. Son Samuel was willed 33% of this land and his interest in the sawmill while son Jacob received 66% of the land. Samuel also received cousin Sarah's (wife of John Badger of Norwich CT) portion of her father Nicholas' undivided estate on 6 Oct 1724 for £30. He owned iron mines in Stoughton and 12% of an iron forge in Bridgewater (Packard's Mill). The iron was probably used in his forge and blacksmith business. Samuel died young at the age of 37, bodily indigent but of perfect mind. [Plymouth Co., MA deeds, FHLC #0558817, v. 14, p. 56-7; #0558818, v. 16, p. 57; #0558818, v. 17, p. 136-7; #0558819, v. 18, p. 183-4; #0558821, v. 19, p. 15-7, p. 141-3, p. 137-8; #0558821, v. 23, p. 16-9]

spouse: Poore, Hannah (1692 - )
- m. 1 DEC 1714 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts
----------child: Noyes, Samuel (1715 - )
----------child: Noyes, Daniel (1716 - 1780)
----------child: Noyes, Mary (1718 - )
----------child: Noyes, John (1720 - 1770)
----------child: Noyes, Benjamin (1721 - 1748)
----------child: Noyes, Abigail (1723 - )
----------child: Noyes, Jacob (1726 - 1814)
----------child: Noyes, Ebenezer (1729 - 1810)

John Noyes

<a name="I33577"></a>Noyes, John (1646 - 1692) - male b. 20 JAN 1645/46 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts
d. 1691/92 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts

father: Noyes, Nicholas (~1615 - 1701)
mother: Cutting, Mary (1622 - 1701) John grew up in Newbury. He first shows up in town records when he testified in court on 27 Apr 1669 in a case that involved John Woolcott and Peter Tappan on one hand and Nathaniel Cheny on the other. He took the freeman's oath on 9 Jan 1674 with his brother Cutting. John was a house carpenter who lived in the "farms district". His house was built in 1677. His home lot originally belonged to John Hull. One of his descendants, Luther Noyes, lived in this house during the late 1800's. In 1678 John Noyes, John Hale and Francis Tharley fixed the bridge over the Newbury River. John was a juror on 27 Sep 1681. He died in 1691 at the age of 45. He is mentioned in his father's will as deceased. His widow Mary and son Nicholas settled his estate (personal £309, real estate £246). The account was made on 28 Sep 1694. An inventory of his estate (on 22 Sep 1693) by Tristraim Coffin, Abraham Adams and Joseph Pike revealed his lifestyle. He had a house and a barn on a 12 acre homestead. He had 20 acres of meadow and 30 acres of upland. Animals included 2 oxen, 7 cows, 25 sheep and a horse. He had 2 feather beds, a chest, a table and chairs. Kitchen items included iron pots, a frying pan, tubs, barrels, wooden ware, napkins and table cloths. Tools included carpenter's tools, husbandry tools, a spinning wheel, a loom and an iron. Other items found in the inventory included clothes, books, arms, pewter and brass ware.

From "Genealogical Record of Noyes descendents": John purchased property for home in "Farms District" after former owner, John Hull, died in 1670. "The house, a substantial ediface, was built in a style unusual for a farmhouse in those early days. The front hall is maniscotted, and a handsome staircase with the elaborately curved balusters, these fashonable for the first class mansions, leads to the second story. The kitchen...was huge even for the period; an ox could have roasted whole in its capacious recess. This homestead was descended from John of the second generation, to his son and grandson Daniel, to Maj. Samuel, to Samuel his son and was owned in 1879 by his son, Luther Noyes.

He was listed in the 1688 Newbury tax roll at 5+13 acres. He was listed as deceased in his father's will of 1700 and also in the entry for his daughter's marriage in 1700. Sources of information: Vital records of Newbury, Massachusetts, to the end of the year 1849; New England Historical and Genealogical Register (vol:page).

"Old Newbury": In 1677 John Noyes bought of Edmund Moores, Jr. eleven acres of land that had formerly belonged to John Hull, late of Newbury, and was known as Hull's Plain. John Noyes died in 1691, leaving a family of ten children. He built one half of the house still standing in 1912, the other half built by a later generation.

NEHGR: Declared freeman 9 Jan 1673/74.

Noyes Pedigree: He died in Newbury, intestate, 1691/92.

spouse: Poore, Mary E. (1651 - >1716)
- m. 23 NOV 1668 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts
----------child: Noyes, Nicholas (1671 - 1718)
----------child: Noyes, Daniel (1673 - 1716)
----------child: Noyes, Mary (1675 - <1735)
----------child: Noyes, John (1678 - 1719)
----------child: Noyes, Martha (1679 - )
----------child: Noyes, Martha (1680 - 1706)
----------child: Noyes, Nathaniel (1681 - 1770)
----------child: Noyes, Elizabeth (1684 - 1708)
----------child: Noyes, Moses (1688 - 1714)
----------child: Noyes, Samuel (1691 - 1729)

Nicholas Noyes

  • Cholderton, Wiltshire, England

<a name="I36420"></a>Noyes, Nicholas (~1615 - 1701) - male b. ABT 1614/15 in Cholderton, Wiltshire, England
d. 23 NOV 1701 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts

father: Noyes, William (~1568 - 1616)
mother: Parker, Anne (~1576 - 1658) Nicholas Noyes was born in Cholderton, co. Wilts, about 1614. In 1674 he gave his age as about 60 [Ipswich Deeds, 4:187). He married about 1641 Mary Cutting of Newbury who died before 1700. He died in Newbury on November 23, 1701.

_What was evidently a family group of six, having decided to go to New England, took the Oath of Allegiance - John Woodbridge, George Brown, Nicholas Noyes, and Richard Brown - on March 24, 1633/34, Thomas Parker and James Noyes on March 26, 1634 - and all embarked on the "<i>Mary and John</i>" at Southampton, reaching Nantasket (now Hull) near Boston sometime in May 1634 and removed to Agwam (Ipswich) where they remained during the following winter. The Rev. Parker and friends remained in Ipswich until the following spring when they applied to the General Court for liberty to settle on the Quascacunquen in an area known as Wessacucon. May 6, 1635, the following orders were passed by the General Court:

  • Wessacucon is allowed by the court to be a plantation & it is refered to Mr. Humfry, Mr. Endicott, Capt. Turner and Capt. Trask or any three of them, to sett out the bounds of Ipswich & Wessacucon or so much thereof as they can & the name of the said plantation in changed & hereafter to be called Neweberry._

Most of the passengers who came to New England in the ship "Mary & John" were induced to remove to Newbury early in the year 1635. Tradition asserts that they came by water from Ipswich and landed on the north shore of the Quascacunquen (now Parker) river, about two or three hundred rods below the bridge that connects the "Lower Green" with the "Great Neck" and the town of Rowley. A monument marks the spot where the settlers disembarked in May or June, 1635. Tradition states that young Nicholas was the first person to leap ashore when their boat anchored in the Quascacumquen (now the Parker) River. (John J. Currier, "History of Newbury" p.312; Sarah Anna Emery "Reminiscences of a Nonagenarian" p.112) They joined 23 men and their families who formed a cattle-breeding company and were among the first settlers at Newbury where their children were born. Newbury's first minister was Thomas Parker, a cousin.

Rev. Nicholas Noyes, in his account of his uncle, Rev. James Noyes, told of the coming of Mr. Parker, Mr. Noyes and his younger brother Nicholas Noyes, a single man, adding "between which three was more than ordinary endearment of affection, which was broken but by death."

Nicholas took the Freeman's Oath in Cambridge on May 17, 1637 when he and eight others walked from Newbury to Cambridge to vote for Gov. Winthrop. On April 21, 1638, he was one of five men fined 2s. 6d. apiece for absence from Newbury town meeting after due warning. The meeting was called to order at eight o'clock in the morning! Two of the men (not Nicholas) had their fines remitted, having sufficient excuses.

It must have been very soon after this that Noyes sailed on a voyage to England, possibly to settle family affairs and to report on conditions in Massachusetts Bay. He returned to New England on the "<i>Jonathan</i>" which sailed from London, probably soon after April 12, 1639, and "came to Anchor in Boston Harbor." Also on the "Jonathan" were Anthony Somerby of Newbury and Mr. Peter Noyes of Sudbury, who, having come over on the "<i>Confidence</i>" in 1638, aged 47, and found New England to his liking, had gone back to his home in Penton, near Andover, co. Hants, to fetch his family. Peter was doubtless a kinsman of Nicholas. [Register, 32:411]

When it was proposed to remove the inhabitants of Newbury from their first settlement on the Parker river to a new site nearer the Merrimac, Nicholas Noyes was a freeholder and a deputy "for the managing of those things that concern the ordering of the New Town" on December 7, 1642.

In 1650 Nicholas and four other men were before the court for saying that "the elders would transgress for a morsel of bread." He lost no prestige thereby for on September 30, 1651, at Ipswich he was sworn clerk of the Newbury market. In 1652 many were brought before the court for not observing the Sumptuary laws of 1651. The records say "Nicholas Noyes' wife, Hugh March's wife, and William Chandler's wife were each presented for wearing a silk hood and scarf; but were discharged on proof that their husbands were worth £200 each. John Hutchins' wife was also discharged upon testifying that she was brought up above the ordinary rank."

The town voted on November 29, 1652, that a school house be built and that £20 a year be appropriated for the schoolmaster, and Mr. Woodman, Richard Kent, jun., Lieut. Pike and Nicholas Noyes were named the committee to carry it out.

Thomas Noyes of Sudbury, son of Peter Noyes, had apparently settled in Newbury, but returned to live in Sudbury before 1656 when he appointed his friend Mr. Nicholas Noyes, gentleman, and Robert Long, both of Newbury, his attorneys to let his house and lands.

Nicholas was appointed Commissioner to End Small Causes, or local justice, in 1657 and 1658. His most important service, however, was as deputy to the General Court in 1660 and in 1678 when on September 19 he was chosen by the town "to serve at the next session of the Court until it be ended," a special session having been called for October 2 at which the oath of allegiance to King Charles II was submitted and signed by the deputies; he served also 28 May 1679, 19 May 1680, and 4 Jan 1680-84.

In the long and bitter controversy between Rev. Mr. Parker and Edward Woodman, Nicholas was one of Parker's chief supporters. He was chosen deacon of the First Parish of Newbury on March 20, 1683/4.

Sometime before his death his son Nicholas, the Salem parson, wrote of him as "through the mercy of God yet living, and hath of children, grandchildren and great grandchildren above one hundred."

In deed 15:41 at Salem he conveyed the property to grandson Nicholas, son of his son John April 19, 1698. Deed 27:8 Salem 1 Apr 1673 is an agreement between parents Nicholas and Mary and their son Cutting.

The homestead of Nicholas Noyes was owned and occupied in 1885 by the heirs of Nathaniel Little.

spouse: Cutting, Mary (1622 - 1701)
- m. 17 MAY 1637 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts
----------child: Noyes, Mary (1641 - 1721)
----------child: Noyes, Hannah (1643 - 1705)
----------child: Noyes, John (1646 - 1692)
----------child: Noyes, Nicholas (1647 - 1717)
----------child: Noyes, Cutting (1649 - 1734)
----------child: Noyes, Sarah (1651 - 1652)
----------child: Noyes, Sarah (1653 - >1714)
----------child: Noyes, Timothy (1655 - 1718)
----------child: Noyes, James B. (1657 - >1723)
----------child: Noyes, Abigail (1659 - 1747)
----------child: Noyes, Rachel (1661 - 1720)
----------child: Noyes, Thomas (1663 - <1695)
----------child: Noyes, Rebecca (1665 - 1683)
----------child: Noyes, ? (~1667 - )

William Noyes

  • Cholderton, Wiltshire, England

<a name="I38499"></a>Noyes, William (~1568 - 1616) - male b. ABT 1568 in Cholderton, Wiltshire, England
d. 1616 in Cholderton, Wiltshire, England

father: Noyes, Robert (~1518 - >1599) NEHG Register, Vol. 149: William Noyes Rev. Born, 1568. Died, before the 30th of April 1622, in Cholderton, Wilts, England (near the edge of Hants, between Amesbury in the west and Andover in Hampshire). William Noyes, plebian, was matriculated, age 20, at University College, Oxford, 15 Nov 1588, being admitted to the B.A. degree 31 May 1592. He was instituted rector of Cholderton in 1601, according to the Salisbury "Diocesan Register".

Rev. Cotton Mather, pastor of the North Church in Boston, provides an insight into the character of William Noyes while describing, from a contemporary viewpoint, the early education of Ann's nephew, Rev. Thomas Parker.
"This Mr. Thomas Parker was the only son of his father, who was very desirous to have him a scholar, committed him unto perhaps a godly, but a very severe master [Rev. William Noyes]. Under this hard master, though he was well nigh discouraged by the dulness which he apprehended in his own capacity, yet the consideration of his father's desire made him, with an early piety, to join his prayers unto his pains, that he might have his education prospered; and God so prospered him, that he arrived unto a desirable degree of knowledge, both in tongues and in arts." [Magnalia Christi Americana (Hartford, 1855), 1:480-488].

William's grandson, Rev. Nicholas Noyes, of Salem, Massachusetts, told Rev. Cotton Mather that his grandfather was "a very learned man", whose wife was a sister of the learned Mr. Robert Parker.

The register of the Diocese shows that he officiated in the Parish from 1602 to 1620, at which time he resigned. He was then appointed Attorney General to the King. In 1621, he was succeeded as rector by his son Nathan. Despite his scholarly ways, either Rev. William Noyes failed to keep a parish register for Cholderton, or the book has been lost. When Mr. Samuel Heskins became rector in 1651, he felt it necessary to begin a new book and recorded somewhat erroneous information concerning William and his son Nathan. In the NEHG Register, Vol. 42, Oct 1888, p.403 Edward Deering Noyes received a letter from the current Rector of Cholderton, Rev. Edwin P. Barrow in which is the following extract from the Registry Book: "Mr. William Noyes Rector of Choldington about 30 years departed this life anno 1616. Mr. Nathan Noyes succeeded his father in the Rectorie of Choldrington and departed this life in ye year 1651." Among the burials extracted from the register is "Mrs. Ann Noyes, widow & Relict of Mr. William Noyes sometime Rector of Choldrington, March 7, 1657, age 82. The present parish register was begun only in 1651, but a complete list of the incumbents from 1297 is preserved in the Salisbury Diocesan Register. The following records are taken from the "Parish Notes," published in 1889 by Rev. Edwin P. Barrow, the then rector.

"The Church of St. Nicholas, Cheldreton, was given to the Monks of St. Neots (Huntingdonshire) about 1175 by Roger Burnard, and the grant was confirmed by Pope Alexander III. In 1380, 1399 and 1401 John Skylling, lord of the manor, was also patron of the church, probably by temporary grants from the Convent. In 1445 it was again in St. Neots' Priory, but seems to have been finally alienated to John Skylling about 1449." Through several patrons it came to Sir Thomas Lovell, lord of the manor, in 1492 and 1494. John Thornborough was patron in 1567, and by him and Giles Hutchins the living was given to William Noyes. Rev. William Noyes became rector just before the death of Queen Elizabeth and held the living until his death. In 1840, the old church was pulled down

Cholderton is a small town on the Bourne, about eleven miles from Salisbury, which contains the great Salisbury Cathedral, built in the year 1220 A.D., whose lofty tower overlooks the dead Roman city of Sarum and "Stonehenge." the ruins of the wonderful pre-historic temple of the ancient Celtic Druids, in the midst of the Salisbury Plain. Nearby is Wilton House, the seat of the Earl of Pembroke. It is sometimes called West Cholderton, to distinguish it from Cholderton, Hampshire, which is known as East Cholderton.

He married Ann Parker, who was a sister of Rev. Robert Parker, a learned Puritan divine, and a graduate of Oxford, who was driven to Holland for "non-conformity" to Queen Elizabeth's forms.

He died intestate before 30 April 1622, when an inventory of his estate was made. 28 May 1622, his widow Anne was appointed administratrix (Court of Archdeacon of Sarum).

NEHG Register, Vol. 149: The inventory of "all the goods & cattles of Wm Noise clarck l[ate of] of West Choldrington in the County of Wiltsh[ire] taken and prized by John Bacheler & Richard Noyse the 30th of Aprill 1622" included:
Imprimis his wearing app[ar]ell & money in his purse s
Item in the Chamber ov[er] the hall
2 bedsteds i chest i flasket one little binery bord
i bedpan 2 old coffers i forme & other old household implents viiis iiij
Item linnen iijs
Item 2 old flock beds 2 flock pillowes
a fether bolster 3 little fether pillowes
3 blankets & 2 cov[er]leds, one pound and halfe of fethers xxs
Item in the chamber ov[er] the buttry
2 old bedsteads a peece of a presse and
a few other household implements ijs
Item in the buttry
1 old combe, i old barrell 3 little tables
2 old formes 1 little hiver 1 old powdring tub
search i seeve, i peck, i peele i torne i pewter platter
2 sawcers one old pottinger 1 chamber pott one little brasen candlestick
1 little old pot 2 little skillets & other old household implem[en]ts vjs
Item in the kitchen
one little bord, 2 old formes 1 frying pan, 1 greeiron
1 brech one tramell 1 pothanger one cradle 1 chaire
1 driping pan and a fewe other household implem[en]ts iijs iiijd
Item in the backside
one capon and 4 hens one old rack and 2 or three old troughs iijs
Item 2 bushels of wheate and a little bacon viijs

The total was an extremely modest £3, 2 shillings, 8 pence. We may assume that he had disposed of his library and other valuables before his death. Anne Noyse took administration with a bond, dated 28 May 1622 and co-signed in a well-educated hand by Cuthbert Parker, yeoman, of Whitchbury, Hampshire, presumable Anne's brother; both used heraldic seals.

James Frazier, in 1847, was rector of Cholderton, and in 1870 Bishop of Chester in 1884, and Bishop of Oxford, in 1888. The advowson of the rectory of Cholderton now belongs to the Provost and Fellows of Oriel College, Oxford, having come into their possession in 1698.

His brother, Richard Noyes, of Cholderton, yeoman, made his will 25 Aug 1639, in which he mentions widow Sara. Another brother, Robert Noyes, yeoman, born in 1570, died 20 Jan 1659, and was buried at Cholderton. The will of Richard Noyes of Manningford Bruce, in the diocese of Sarum, 2 Feb 1590, mentions "the sons of Robert Noyes of Cholderton." This Robert may have been the father of William, Richard, and Robert Noyes. Richard Noyes of Manningford Bruce was son of William Noyes of Urchfont, yeoman (will 1557), who purchased the prebend of Urchfont in 1540, from the Earl of Hertford, afterwards Protector Somerset. The Noyes family of Urchfont was of the same stock as that of Cholderton.

NEHG Register, Vol. 12, Jul 1858, p. 276. "Examination of a Register of the diocese of Sarum, from early in the 13th century, printed by Sir Thomas Philips, a distinguished Antiquary, but never published, helped James Savage, Esq. to one or two of our New England divines from Wiltshire: Wilielmus Noyes p.m. at the church of Choldrington 1602, and Nathaniel Noyes p.r. Wm Noyes at the church of West Chaldrington 1621. He states that p.m. is an abbreviation for per mortem and p.r. for per resignationem.

spouse: Stephens, Ann (~1575 - )
- m. BEF 1596
----------child: Noyes, Ephraim (~1596 - )
----------child: Noyes, Nathan (1597 - 1651)
----------child: Noyes, John (~1600 - )
----------child: Noyes, Sarah (*1605 - )
spouse: Parker, Anne (~1576 - 1658)
- m. 1608
----------child: Noyes, James (1608 - 1656)
----------child: Noyes, ? (~1611 - 1671)
----------child: Noyes, Mowit (1613 - )
----------child: Noyes, Nicholas (~1615 - 1701)
----------child: Noyes, Ann (1617 - )

Robert Noyes

  • Cholderton, Wiltshire, England

<a name="I37001"></a>Noyes, Robert (~1518 - >1599) - male b. ABT 1518 in Cholderton, Wiltshire, England
d. AFT 17 NOV 1599 in Cholderton, Wiltshire, England

father: Noyes, Nicholas (~1496 - ~1575) Married before 1568 a woman whose name is presently unknown.

Robert was many times in court, particularly regarding the manor of Littleton.

Robert Noyes was listed in the subsidies of 10 September 13 Elizabeth I [1571] and 42 Elizabeth I [1599/1600] (Chancery Proceedings, Series II, C3/151/91).

While we have been taught to look with suspicion on ages given in round numbers, Robert's 1598 deposition suggests that he was nearly fifty years old when his first known child was born. When Richard Noyes of Manningford Bruce in 1590/91 gave a small legacy to "every of the sonnes of Robert Noyes of Chowlderton," the implication was that there were at least two boys and probably more. Evidence of only two have been found.

spouse:
- m. BEF 1568
----------child: Noyes, William (~1568 - 1616)
----------child: Noyes, Robert (~1570 - )
----------child: Noyes, Richard (~1572 - >1639)

Nicholas Noyes

  • Littleton, Kimpton, Hampshire, England

<a name="I36417"></a>Noyes, Nicholas (~1496 - ~1575) - male b. ABT 1496 in Littleton, Kimpton, Hampshire, England
d. ABT 1575 in Cholderton, Wiltshire, England

father: Noyes, Robert (~1467 - <1524)
mother: Mondey, Joan (*1465 - >1532) Nicholas was listed at Cholderton in the subsidy rolls of 14 & 15 Henry VIII [1523-4], 10 Jan. 16 Henry VIII [1525], 8 Oct. 32 Henry VIII [1540], 12 Oct. 35 Henry VIII [1543], and 2 Elizabeth I [1559/60]. (Subsidy Rolls, E179/197/156; E179/197/184; E179/197/241; E179/197/275). In 1523/4 he was taxed 21 shillings on goods valued at £21. In 1527 in the Hundred of Ambrysbury "In the parishe of Chalderton [which at that time contained only 57 persons] first Nicholas Nowyse hath whett for the allowance for thye feyndyng of his houssold xvj quarters and to sell vj quarters .... in barley, besydes to sow xxx quarters and for the feynding of his houssold xx quarters and to sell xiiij quarters." (Wiltshire Notes & Queries, 2 (1896-1898): 68-69).

He is on the list of taxpayers for the benevolence of 1545 for Cholderton and was probably the Nicholas Noyes who was named overseer and witnessed the will of Cicilia Noyes of Shipton, widow, in 1546. ("Two Sixteenth Century Taxation Lists", G.D. Ramsay, ed. (Devizes, 1954) p.2. Consistory Court of Wincester, Unlisted Wills and Administrations, U. 129).

At the dissolution of the monastaries, the manor of Littleton passed from the Abbot of St. Peter's, Gloucester, to the Bishop of Gloucester, who soon released it to the King, who then granted it to Sir John St. John. Disputes with tenants ensued. ("The Victoria History of Hampshire and the Isle of Wight", William Page, ed. (London, 1911), p.374; for the St. Johns, see S.T. Bindoff, "The History of Parliment[:] The House of Commons 1509-1558, vol. 3" (London, 1982), pp. 254-255, and "Wiltshire Visitation Pedigrees 1623" (London, 1954), p.168) In 1552, Nicholas St. John claimed that he had purchased two ninth parts of a lease of the manor of Littleton, a property originally leased in 1516 by Nicholas Noyes' parents. The claimants actually came to blows when St. John and his servants came to mow the pasture and were met by the servants of Nicholas Noyes' brother. (REQ2/14/71)

John St. John, Esquire, apparently entered into the manor of Littleton by force after the elder Robert Noyes' death.

In an undated Chancery Proceeding between 1558 and 1579, son Robert Noyes stated that his father had owned a barn and some land in Cholderton and that Nicholas entered into the premises and for divers years solely and alone did enjoy the same until about four years since being a very old man did set and assign the premises amongst divers [other] things to be occupied by the defendant [Robert] and that Nicholas' son Thomas Noyes, yeoman, sold his portion of the interest in the property to Robert Noyes.

Nicholas' son Robert had land in Cholderton that was described in the Patent Roll of 1581/2 as "now or lately in the occupation of Nicholas Noyes or his assignes."

spouse:
----------child: Noyes, Thomas (~1517 - <1579)
----------child: Noyes, Robert (~1518 - >1599)
----------child: Noyes, Albon (~1521 - )

Robert Noyes

  • Littleton, Kimpton, Hampshire, England

<a name="I36999"></a>Noyes, Robert (~1467 - <1524) - male b. ABT 1467 in Littleton, Kimpton, Hampshire, England
d. BEF 4 APR 1524 in Littleton, Kimpton, Hampshire, England

father: Noyes, ? (*1435 - ) In 1516, Robert Noyes leased the manor of Littleton, Hampshire, from the Abbot of the Monastery of Saint Peter's of Gloucester. (C1/861/87-91) After his death, his widow made a new lease and enjoyed it nine years before her own death. The complicated suit brought by Nicholas St. John in the Court of Requests, over possession of two-ninths of this manor, resulted in the recording of depositions about four generations of Robert's family. (Court of Requests, REQ2/14/71) Robert Noyes left a will, naming his son William as his executor, but this document does not survive. (Lists and Indexes, No. 50, "List of Early Chancery Proceedings", vol.7 (London, 1926), p.186) Joan Noyes left the earliest Noyes will on record. Buried outside the door of the church of Blessed Mary of Kimpton next to wife Joan. spouse: Mondey, Joan (*1465 - >1532)
- m. ABT 1488
----------child: Noyes, Robert (~1490 - )
----------child: Noyes, William (~1492 - <1546)
----------child: Noyes, John (~1494 - <1538)
----------child: Noyes, Nicholas (~1496 - ~1575)

Noyes

  • England

<a name="I27365"></a>Noyes, ? (*1435 - ) - male Either John who farmed the manor of Ramridge 1475-84 or Robert 1493-97. It is not certain which of these two men was the father of these children, but an analysis of the evidence indicates that they were siblings.

The surname NOYES is rare. It may have originated in East Anglia at a very early period. Land held by Walter Noyse was mentioned in a fine concerning land in 'Scroteby', Norfolk, on 10 May 1209. William and Simon Noysse were both listed in the Ville of Laxfield, in Hoxne Hundred, Suffolk, in 1327. There were six Noyse wills proved in the Court of Archdeacon of Suffolk before 1600: Robert Noyse, of Fressingfield, 1463; Agnes his widow, of Fressingfield, 1464; William, of Ubbeston, 1469; Robert, of Wingfield, 1471; William, of Laxfield, 1510; and Robert, of Laxfield, 1510.

The adjoining parishes of Laxfield, Fressingfield, Wingfield, and Ubbeston lie in the north-central part of the county. The chief landholder in the region then was the de la Pole family, first Earls, then Dukes of Suffolk. The land came into their family through the marriage of Katherine, heiress of Sir John de Wingfield, to Michael de la Pole, first Earl of Suffolk. The manor of Ramridge, Hampshire, had also been acquired through the Wingfield marriage. For this reason it is possible that the Duke sent one of his Suffolk men to oversee the distant Hampshire manor, founding the Noyes family in that county. Ramridge was important as one of the greatest fairs in England was held partly on its lands.

Ramridge was held by the first Earl of Suffolk at his death in 1391. The Wingfield estates passed to his eldest son, Michael, who succeeded as Second Earl (d. Sept. 1415), but, importantly, Ramridge was settled on the male heirs of his younger brother, Sir Thomas de la Pole. On Thomas's death (21 Aug. 1420), it passed to his son Thomas, who died seised of 'Ramrugge' on 27 July 1430. Because he died without male issue, Ramridge passed to his cousin, William de la Pole (son of the Second Earl), who was created first Duke of Suffolk. Thus Ramridge was reunited with the Wingate estates in 1430. The first of the Noyes family in Hampshire may have arrived as servants of the first Duke of Suffolk at his manor of Ramridge about 1430-32. The court rolls of the manor of Ramridge record that Robert Noys was farming the manor (rendering its accounts) in 1432-33.

The Duke and his wife, Alice Chaucer, granddaughter and heir of the poet, were granted license to found God's House, better known as Ewelme Hospital, in 1437, but it was not endowed with the manor of Ramridge until 1442. It was during this short period between 1430 and 1442 that a Noyse/Noyes from Laxfield or Wingate, Suffolk, might have ended up on the distant manor of Ramridge, as the Hospital would have had no Suffolk interests by which to draw a Noyes from that county to Hampshire.

The Noyes family continued as farmers of the manor of Ramridge for at least two more centuries. The court rolls are intermittent, so the line of descent in the earliest generations in Hampshire is not clear. Robert Noys is recorded as rendering accounts for the manor of Ramridge in 1432-33. John Noyse was the farmer of Ramrugge on 26 November 1476, 28 November 1477, 1478, 1482/3, and 1484. He likely died in the next few years, as Robert Noyes was farmer of Ramrugge in 1493 and 1497. The abstract under date 21 May 1 Henry VIII [1509] states, "To this court came Thomas Noyse and took of the lord a cottage called the Saynte with lands and one acre of meadow ... to hold to the said Thomas and Agnes his wife and the longer liver of them - to pay heriot on death. And give as fine 20s. Same paid 19 Henry VIII (1503/4) [sic]." The entry for 27 September 4 Henry VIII [1512] reads, "presented that Thomas No[y]se farmer of this lordship and his predecessors, time out of mind, had amongst other things a parcel of land called the "Stallys" and "Bothis" lying on the King's way leading E&W as appears by metes and bounds." On 16 September 9 Henry VIII [1517] the Master of Ewelme granted Thomas Noyse the lease of the capital messuage of his manor of Ramrugge with the lands thereto belonging, courts, etc., excepting the advowson of Wee [Weyhill] Church, for a period of 50 years at a rent of £8 6s 8d. Another lease, dated 21 June 10 Henry VIII [1518] granted the same, at the same rate, for a period of 40 years. Thomas Noyse was farmer of the manor on 6 October 20 Henry VIII [1528] when he made agreements with his tenants This last Thomas Noyes is certainly Thomas Noyes (b. say 1488), from whom descent can be traced with certainty.

There are two likely scenarios by which Ramridge might have descended through the earliest generations of the Hampshire Noyes family. The first scenario assumes a direct descent through [1] Robert (b. say 1390), [II] John (b. say 1415), [III] Robert (b. say 1440), [IV] Thomas of Andover (b. say 1465), to [V] Thomas (b. say 1488).

The second scenario takes into account the possibility that the Robert who farmed Ramridge from 1493 to 1497 might have been Thomas's uncle Robert, who later acquired the lease of the manor of Littleton, and may have held Ramridge during the minority of his nephew Thomas as guardian. The earliest [I] Robert (b. say 1390) who farmed Ramridge in 1432-33 would again be the first generation, then the second generation would be unknown. [III] John (b. say 1440) who farmed Ramridge from 1475 to 1484 would be next, and father of both [IV] Thomas (b. say 1465) mentioned in the court rolls of Andover 1490-1491, and Robert, of Kimpton, who farmed Ramridge from 1493 to 1497 during the minority of his nephew, [V] Thomas Noyes (b. say 1488).

But as only names and dates have been gleaned from the manorial records, no specific relationships are known with certainty until we reach Thomas Noyes (b. say 1488). It is impossible at this point to determine which descent is correct.

spouse:
----------child: Noyes, Thomas (~1465 - )
----------child: Noyes, Robert (~1467 - <1524)
----------child: Noyes, ? (~1469 - )
----------child: Noyes, ? (~1471 - )
----------child: Noyes, William (~1480 - ~1530)

John Noyes

  • Abington, Plymouth, Massachusetts

<a name="I33610"></a>Noyes, John (1720 - 1770) - male b. 20 APR 1720 in Abington, Plymouth, Massachusetts
d. 30 MAY 1770 in Pembroke, Merrimack, New Hampshire

father: Noyes, Samuel (1691 - 1729)
mother: Poore, Hannah (1692 - ) The Poore genealogy erroneously states that Joseph Noyes married Abigail, daughter of Benjamin and Elizabeth Poore. The records of Rowley say that John Noyes of Haverhill married Abigail Poore of Rowley, 11 Jun 1741. The history of Pembroke says that John, son of Samuel and Hannah (Poore) Noyes, of Abington married Abigail Poor. After the death of his father, his uncle Samuel Poor of Rowley was appointed his guardian, 1736. He settled in Pembroke, at what was then called the "Ox Bow". After his death, his son Benjamin was appointed administrator of his estate, which consisted of the home in Bow, valued at £115; an island in the Merrimac River, £9; house and farm in Pembroke, £170; personal property £92. He was the progenitor of the largest branch of the family from the fourth generation, having eight sons, who had seventy-five children. It has been said that Moses, their seventh son, married and lived in Bow, N.H., had four sons, and that he was drowned in the Merrimac River. No known descendents have been traced.

John was 9 years old when his father died. John left Abington and was sent to live in Rowley with his uncle Samuel Poor (Hen3, John2) who was appointed his guardian. Abigail was John's first cousin. After they married they moved (in the summer of 1742) to Suncook (Pembrook) NH where they were among the first settlers of that town. On 25 Aug 1745 John received a deed (v.32, p.382-4) for 18 acres of land (lot #4) from the Suncook proprietors. John had agreed in 1742 to settle in town and work as a blacksmith for 10 years in return for the land. Up until 1763 John was usually referred to (on deeds) as a blacksmith. He was also called a yeoman (farmer), a physician (1753), a gentleman, an innkeeper (1759) and a Justice of the Peace (Apr 1763). John received a license from the town to run a tavern on 5 Apr 1754. After 1763 he was referred to as Esquire. Suncook was granted by Massachusetts to a group of soldiers on 6 Aug 1728. New Hampshire, which also claimed the land, granted it to a group from Stratham. NH called the town Bow and divided it into lots in 1733. Suncook had been into lots (in 1728) by Massachusetts and was being settled. The lots did not coincide with one another. This led to land disputes for many years after. John bought land from the Bow proprietors in 1758 and 1759 (lots (1-2), (2-20), and (#46) to settle claims against his land. The ownership of the land had been settled in favor NH (Bow) and against Suncook on 5 Mar 1740. NH passed the Bow Act to force the Suncook settlers into compliance. In 1756 John Noyes was chosen (forced) by NH to collect money from them (or he would have to pay). Nobody did anything. NH finally came to terms with the settlers. The area was alternately called Suncook and Bow. Most of the settlements were on the east side of the Merrimack River. John Noyes presented a town petition to the NH General Court in Jan 1757 asking that the land east of the river be renamed Pembrook. This request was granted. The area west of the river became modern Bow. John owned intervale land (riverbank area) on both sides of the Merrimack River. This land was good for farming and grazing and this is what he used the land for. He also owned: 1) at least 11 of the Bow lots, 2) land along the Suncook, Soucook and Turkey Rivers and 3) land in nearby Allenstown, Starkstown, Moblytown, Boscowan and Dunbarton. The intervale lots were about 15 acres each and the Bow lots 40 acres. He had part ownership in a mill on the Turkey River in 1760. John's home lot was near the present center of Pembrook (lot #4 Suncook, (1-7) Bow). His blacksmith shop was probably here also. He lived here (and on lot #34) until 1768, when he was said to have been from either Suncook, Bow or Pembrook (deeds, court records 1745-68). He moved to modern Bow on the west side of the river in 1769, just before his death in 1770. Deeds show that John was a grantee 50 times paying £18,119 and a grantor 17 times receiving L9,700. He seems to have accumulated more land than he sold. This discrepancy is not explained in the inventory of his estate. He bought 50% of lot (1-7) from Simon4 Dearborn (yeoman) of Epping NH on 6 Feb 1759 for £107 10s. John4 McMurphy witnessed a deed (21 Apr 1755) to him for lot #20. Sons Benjamin, Samuel and John were used as witnesses on deeds after 1759. He sold land to his oldest sons: 1) Benjamin (gentleman) - lots #53, #54, 60 acres, on 11 Feb 1764 for £3,000 with 2 houses and a barn, 2) John (yeoman) - lots #47, #48, #49, 60 acres, on 21 Oct 1765 for £90 and 3) Samuel (yeoman) - lot (2-9), 40 acres, on 29 Aug 1768 for £100 with a barn. Wife Abigail cosigned a deed with John on 13 Nov 1767. John appeared on many court records. He was a plaintiff 17 times seeking £1,998 in damages and was sued as a defendant 9 times (for a total of £2,053). John and Abigail had 75 grandchildren. Son Benjamin administered John's estate. On 25 Aug 1770 an inventory was taken. The estate was valued at £386 10s 8p. It consisted of his homestead in Bow, a farm in Pembrook, an island in the Merrimack River and personal property. Some of the animals he owned were: horses, oxen, 6 cows, 2 calves, pigs and 22 sheep. His tools included hoes, spades, a pitch fork, hammers, a grindstone, a loom, a spinning wheel and spools. He owned equipment for farming: yokes, plows, harrows, saddles and bridles. Household items included kitchen utensils, clothes, furniture and bedding. Other items listed were: a large bible, law books, hymn books, a clock, a canoe, tin ware, pewter, a hat and a wig, a writing stand, 4 bells and 10 bottles of liquor.

spouse: Poore, Abigail (1721 - 1814)
- m. 11 JUN 1741 in Rowley, Essex, Massachusetts
----------child: Noyes, Benjamin (1742 - 1811)
----------child: Noyes, John (1744 - 1825)
----------child: Noyes, Samuel (1746 - 1812)
----------child: Noyes, Daniel (1748 - 1822)
----------child: Noyes, Enoch (1750 - 1842)
----------child: Noyes, Aaron (1752 - 1821)
----------child: Noyes, Moses (1756 - 1757)
----------child: Noyes, Moses (1758 - 1805)
----------child: Noyes, Nathan (1761 - 1825)

Samuel Noyes

  • Pembroke, Merrimack, New Hampshire

<a name="I37303"></a>Noyes, Samuel (1746 - 1812) - male b. 2 JUL 1746 in Pembroke, Merrimack, New Hampshire
d. 14 MAR 1812

father: Noyes, John (1720 - 1770)
mother: Poore, Abigail (1721 - 1814) Revolutionary War soldier from Pembroke. Co. Cdr. James Cochran; Regt. Cdr. Kelly.
Had an out-of-wedlock child with Mary Kimball.
spouse: Bradley, Hannah (1742 - 1816)
- m. 1 DEC 1768 in Haverhill, Essex, Massachusetts
----------child: Noyes, Hannah (1770 - 1856)
----------child: Noyes, Lois (1772 - )
----------child: Noyes, Nathaniel (1774 - 1829)
----------child: Noyes, Betsey (1775 - )
----------child: Noyes, Sarah (*1776 - )
----------child: Noyes, John (1777 - )
----------child: Noyes, Mary "Polly" (1779 - 1870)
----------child: Noyes, David (1784 - 1854)
----------child: Noyes, Samuel (1784 - 1864)

Samuel Noyes

  • Pembroke, Merrimack, New Hampshire

<a name="I37326"></a>Noyes, Samuel (1784 - 1864) - male b. OCT 1784 in Pembroke, Merrimack, New Hampshire
d. 4 JAN 1864

father: Noyes, Samuel (1746 - 1812)
mother: Bradley, Hannah (1742 - 1816)
spouse: Morrill, Elizabeth (1788 - 1853)
- m. 15 MAY 1816 in Dedham, Norfolk, Massachusetts
----------child: Noyes, Samuel Bradley (1817 - )
----------child: Noyes, Maria (1819 - 1850)
----------child: Noyes, William Augustus (1821 - )
----------child: Noyes, Elizabeth (1823 - )
----------child: Noyes, Emeline (1827 - )
----------child: Noyes, George L. (1839 - )

Samuel Bradley Noyes

  • Enter a place Dedham, Norfolk, Massachusetts

<a name="I37383"></a>Noyes, Samuel Bradley (1817 - ) - male b. 9 APR 1817 in Dedham, Norfolk, Massachusetts
father: Noyes, Samuel (1784 - 1864)
mother: Morrill, Elizabeth (1788 - 1853) Attended the public schools, and for one year a private school in Dedham, under the tuition of the Hon. Francis W. Bird. He entered Phillips Academy, Andover in 1836 and remained there until the summer of 1840 when he entered Harvard, graduating in 1844. In 1875, the Philomathean Society in the academy, in which Mr. Noyes played a prominent part during his student days at Andover, held its semi-centennial anniversary, and he was chosen the orator of the day.

On leaving college he studied law with the Hon. Isaac Davis of Worcester, afterward with Hon. Ezra Wilkinson of Dedham and the Hon. Ellis Ames of Canton. He was admitted to the Norfolk County bar in April, 1847 and began practicing law in his adopted town of Canton. He was a member of the New England Historic and Genealogical Society, the New England Horticultural Society, the Massachusetts Press Association, the Stoughton Musical Society, and the Bunker Hill Monument Association. He died in 1900.

spouse: Beaumont, Georgiana (*1828 - )
- m. AFT 1 JAN 1850
----------child: Noyes, Teresa I. (1851 - )
----------child: Noyes, Eliza R. (1857 - )
----------child: Noyes, Bradley M. (1864 - )
----------child: Noyes, James Beaumont (1870 - 1949)

Teresa I Noyes

  • Canton, Norfolk, Massachusetts

<a name="I38087"></a>Noyes, Teresa I. (1851 - ) - female b. 9 AUG 1851 in Canton, Norfolk, Massachusetts
father: Noyes, Samuel Bradley (1817 - )
mother: Beaumont, Georgiana (*1828 - )
spouse: French, Charles (*1847 - )

Mary E Poore

  • Andover, Essex, Massachusetts

<a name="I42107"></a>Poore, Mary E. (1651 - >1716) - female b. 21 MAR 1651 in Andover, Essex, Massachusetts
d. AFT 1716 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts

father: Poore, Daniel (1624 - 1689)
mother: Farnum, Margaret "Mary" (~1628 - 1714)
spouse: Noyes, John (1646 - 1692)
- m. 23 NOV 1668 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts
----------child: Noyes, Nicholas (1671 - 1718)
----------child: Noyes, Daniel (1673 - 1716)
----------child: Noyes, Mary (1675 - <1735)
----------child: Noyes, John (1678 - 1719)
----------child: Noyes, Martha (1679 - )
----------child: Noyes, Martha (1680 - 1706)
----------child: Noyes, Nathaniel (1681 - 1770)
----------child: Noyes, Elizabeth (1684 - 1708)
----------child: Noyes, Moses (1688 - 1714)
----------child: Noyes, Samuel (1691 - 1729)

Daniel Poore

  • Oxford, Oxfordshire, England

<a name="I42015"></a>Poore, Daniel (1624 - 1689) - male b. 1624 in Oxford, Oxfordshire, England
d. 8 JUN 1689

father: Poor, Daniel (*1586 - ) He probably emigrated in May 1638 from Southampton, England to New England aboard ship "Bevis of Hampton" as "Dayell" aged 14 with possibly a sister Alice aged 20 and a brother Samuel aged 18 as servants of Stephen or Richard Dummer of Newbury, MA.

NE Families: POOR Daniel Poore, the immigrant ancestor. came from England in the ship "Bevis". Captain Robert Batten, master, sailing from Southampton with sixty other passengers in May, 1638, when he was fourteen years of age. He came in the family of Stephen and Alice Dummer. In the same ship came also Samuel Poore, and Alice Poore, who married George Little, of Newbury, Massachusetts. Daniel doubtless lived in Newbury about ten years, and Samuel and Alice settled for life there. John Poore, probably an elder brother, also settled there and another brother, Thomas Poore, settled and died at Andover, leaving neither wife nor children. Daniel Poore married in Boston, October 20, 1650. Mary Farnum, sister of John Farnum, who also settled in Andover, and has many descendants in that section. Daniel Poore died June 8, 1689, aged sixty-five; his wife also died in Andover, February 3, 1714, aged eighty-five years. Their home was on the easterly side of the Shawshine river, not far from its mouth and near the station on the Boston & Maine railroad in North Andover near the Merrimac river, and the street railway from Lawrence to North Andover passes near the site of the old house. The ancient bridge over the Shawshine river is near by and the homestead included land on both sides of the river below the bridge.

spouse: Farnum, Margaret "Mary" (~1628 - 1714)
- m. 20 OCT 1650 in Boston, Suffolk, Massachusetts
----------child: Poore, Mary E. (1651 - >1716)
----------child: Poore, Sarah (1652 - )
----------child: Poore, Martha (1654 - 1723)
----------child: Poore, Daniel (1656 - 1735)
----------child: Poore, John (1658 - 1690)
----------child: Poore, Hannah (1660 - 1746)
----------child: Poore, Elizabeth (1661 - 1700)
----------child: Poore, Deborah (1664 - 1704)
----------child: Poore, Ruth (1665 - 1739)
----------child: Poore, Priscilla (1667 - )
----------child: Poore, Lucy (1670 - 1759)

Margaret "Mary" Farnum

<a name="I12189"></a>Farnum, Margaret "Mary" (~1628 - 1714) - female b. ABT 1628 in Rochester, Kent, England
d. 3 FEB 1713/14 in Andover, Essex, Massachusetts

father: Farnum, Ralph (~1603 - 1683)
mother: [Farnum], Alice (~1607 - ) May have immigrated in 1635 to Boston, Suffolk, MA on the "James" from London with her parents and two siblings. spouse: Poore, Daniel (1624 - 1689)
- m. 20 OCT 1650 in Boston, Suffolk, Massachusetts
----------child: Poore, Mary E. (1651 - >1716)
----------child: Poore, Sarah (1652 - )
----------child: Poore, Martha (1654 - 1723)
----------child: Poore, Daniel (1656 - 1735)
----------child: Poore, John (1658 - 1690)
----------child: Poore, Hannah (1660 - 1746)
----------child: Poore, Elizabeth (1661 - 1700)
----------child: Poore, Deborah (1664 - 1704)
----------child: Poore, Ruth (1665 - 1739)
----------child: Poore, Priscilla (1667 - )
----------child: Poore, Lucy (1670 - 1759)

Ralph Farnum

<a name="I12190"></a>Farnum, Ralph (~1603 - 1683) - male b. ABT 1603 in England
d. 8 JAN 1682/83 in Andover, Essex, Massachusetts
TAG - Recorded in the register of St. Nicholas parish, Rochester, county Kent (at the Centre for Kentish Studies, County Hall, Maidstone, Kent).

Baptisms of children match exactly the order and ages of the Farnham children in the James passenger list, and the father is explicitly called a barber in both the baptism of Thomas and the listing of passengers.

BOUGHTON - "FARHNAM, RALPH I. Stated to have descended from Robert De Farnham, a companion of William the Conqueror. The surname comes from the name of a town in Surrey, Eng. B. in 1603 in England. M. Alice ---. On Apr 6, 1635 he sailed from Surrey, Eng., in the ship 'James', with his wife Alice (aged 28y.) and three children, and landed in Boston on June 3, 1635. His name was spelled Ffarman on the ship's list. He was a proprietor at Ipswich, Mass., in 1639, and later went to Andover, Mass. D. Jan. 8, 1682-3. Ralph Farnham II was their son, and Mary Farnham was a daughter."

"There was more than one ship in 1935 named the James. Ralph was not on the April ship, he was on the ship of the same name which sailed in the summer. Hotten has it right. The passengers were certified as eligible to leave England on July 13, 1635, and the ship would have left soon after, depending on winds and whatever. I think they arrived in Boston in September, but I don't have that documented. The other point of confusion is Ralph's date of death. He never went to Andover; his widow had remarried (to Solomon Martin, ship carpenter, 18 June 1648, in Gloucester) and she moved to Andover with her second husband. The Ralph Sr. mentioned in Andover records is Ralph 2, who was 2 years old on board the James. Ralph 1 had presumably died by May 16, 1644, when a "Widow Vernham" was mentioned (as an abutter, I believe) when the will of Robert Muzzey of Ipswich was probated on May 16, 1644. "Widow Vernham" is believed to be Ralph's widow, since George Varnham, also of Ipswich, bought land in 1647. (The probate records are from Vol. 1, probate records of Essex County, reported by Mrs. Louise L. Salmon of Los Altos, CA. The land transaction was reported in "The First Generation of Settlement in Colonial Ipswich, 1633-1660," a 1967 Rutgers dissertation by Edward Spaulding Perzel.) Ralph was first mentioned in Ipswich in 1639, was mentioned a couple of times in 1640, and I don't think there is a later mention. His youngest known child, John, is reported in Andover printed Vital Records to have died June 17, 1723, "in his 83d y"--that is, at age 82. If that is accurate, and if I have calculated correctly, John was born between June of 1640 and June of 1641--and Ralph was alive 9 months before. Charlotte Abbott, who wrote a genealogy newspaper column around the turn of the century, has speculated that Ralph was the barber who disappeared in a snow storm. I'm quite sure that's wrong. That poor fellow was somebody else--I read about it in some academic publication--but Ralph could have disappeared and never found, which might explain Alice's long widowhood. (That's just my own notion; I don't actually know how Massachusetts law treated missing persons and the wives they left behind.)"
Edith Bartley
[email protected]

spouse: [Farnum], Alice (~1607 - )
- m. BEF 1628
----------child: Farnum, Margaret "Mary" (~1628 - 1714)
----------child: Farnum, Thomas (~1631 - 1686)
----------child: Farnum, Ralph (~1633 - 1692)
----------child: Farnum, Sarah (*1637 - 1728)

Mary Cutting

  • Newbury, Essex, MA

<a name="I9694"></a>utting, Mary (1622 - 1701) - female b. 1622 in London, Middlesex, England
d. 23 NOV 1701 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts

father: Cutting, John (~1586 - 1659)
mother: Warde, Mary (b1594 - 1664) In 1652 many were brought before the court for not observing the Sumptuary laws of 1651. The records say "Nicholas Noyes' wife, Hugh March's wife, and William Chandler's wife were each presented for wearing a silk hood and scarf; but were discharged on proof that their husbands were worth £200 each, John Hutchins' wife was also discharged upon testifying that she was brought up above the ordinary rank." (George F. Dow, "Records and Files of the Quarterly Courts of Essex County, MAssachusetts (Salem, Mass., 1911), 1:303.) spouse: Noyes, Nicholas (~1615 - 1701)
- m. 17 MAY 1637 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts
----------child: Noyes, Mary (1641 - 1721)
----------child: Noyes, Hannah (1643 - 1705)
----------child: Noyes, John (1646 - 1692)
----------child: Noyes, Nicholas (1647 - 1717)
----------child: Noyes, Cutting (1649 - 1734)
----------child: Noyes, Sarah (1651 - 1652)
----------child: Noyes, Sarah (1653 - >1714)
----------child: Noyes, Timothy (1655 - 1718)
----------child: Noyes, James B. (1657 - >1723)
----------child: Noyes, Abigail (1659 - 1747)
----------child: Noyes, Rachel (1661 - 1720)
----------child: Noyes, Thomas (1663 - <1695)
----------child: Noyes, Rebecca (1665 - 1683)
----------child: Noyes, ? (~1667 - )

John Cutting

  • Newbury Massachusetts

<a name="I9691"></a>Cutting, John (~1586 - 1659) - male b. ABT 1586 in London, Middlesex, England
d. 20 NOV 1659 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts

father: Cutting, Francis (*1551 - ) A shipmaster, formerly of London, England (source: the Noyes Descendants, vol. 1). "Was at Watertown, Mass., 1636, afterwards at Charlestown, Mass., then removed to Newbury, Mass., 1642." "CUTTING, from Saxon Cuth, well known, famous, & ing, equivalent to the Latin ens, expressing the existence of the quality or action of the word to which it is affixed, as Cuthing, the son of Cuth

Ancestry of Abel Lunt: A sea captain, Cutting made 13 or more Atlantic crossings; in 1634 he was master of the Francis, which brought colonists from Ipswich. In 1636 he took up land at Watertown, in 1638 had a house at Newbury, in 1648 settled at Charlestown, and by 1656 was again living at Newbury. He was in 1647 master of the Advent of Boston. His will names his daughter Mary Noyes and grandson Cutting.

spouse: Warde, Mary (b1594 - 1664)
- m. ABT 1615 in London, Middlesex, England
----------child: Cutting, Judith (~1618 - 1659)
----------child: Cutting, John (~1620 - )
----------child: Cutting, Mary (1622 - 1701)
----------child: Cutting, Sarah (1629 - 1699)

Mary Warde

<a name="I50735"></a>Warde, Mary (b1594 - 1664) - female bap. 22 SEP 1594 in London, Middlesex, England
d. 6 MAR 1664 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts

father: Ward, Edward (*1559 - )
mother: [Ward], Judith (*1563 - ) One American genealogist thinks that Mary was that Mary Cutting named as a sister in the will of Susan Browne of Ipswich, co. Suffolk, made in 1626. Susan also left legacies to her mother Judith Warde, her sister Rebecca Warde and her brother Edward Warde, which makes it obvious that these sisters and brother were children of Edward Warde of Little Wratting, co. Suffolk, yeoman, who named them all and his wife Judith in his will of 1620. This constitutes a valuable clue, but is not proof. See 'Genealogical Gleanings in England', Henry F. Waters, Boston, 1901, p. 584.

Torrey says Mary [?Ward].

spouse: Cutting, John (~1586 - 1659)
- m. ABT 1615 in London, Middlesex, England
----------child: Cutting, Judith (~1618 - 1659)
----------child: Cutting, John (~1620 - )
----------child: Cutting, Mary (1622 - 1701)
----------child: Cutting, Sarah (1629 - 1699)
spouse: Miller, John (*1627 - 1663)
- m. BEF MAY 1662