Summary

Birth:
Ky 1
Death:
31 Dec 1969 2
Louisville, KY 2
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Personal Details

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Person:
Josiah Jackson 1
Age in 1860: 51 1
Birth:
Ky 1
Male 1
Estimated Birth Year: 1809 1
Death:
31 Dec 1969 2
Louisville, KY 2
Cause: effects from exposure 2
Burial:
Burial Date: 01 Nov 1862 2
Burial Place: Cemetery, Winchester, Clark Co. KY 2
Residence:
Place: Estill County, Kentucky 1
From: 1860 1
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Marriage:
Elizabeth Lewis Martin 2
1836 2
To: Oct. 1862 2

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  1. Census - US Federal 1860 [See image]
  2. Contributed by marli
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Stories

Josiah Ashhurst Jackson

Clark and Estill Counties, Kentucky

Elizabeth Lewis Martin, d/o Dr. Samuel D. Martin, was born in Winchester, Clark Co. KY. She married Josiah Ashhurst Jackson, Sr. of Clark Co., in 1836. The family lived a few years in Clark Co. KY, when Josiah purchased an interest in the Red River Iron Works in Estill County, KY and lived at the forge or furnace in said county until 1852, when he moved to Winchester, Clark Co. KY.
Son Samuel Grant Jackson was in the CS Army.
Son George Martin Jackson was a captain in US Army but resigned.
Wife Elizabeth was a Methodist. Her husband Josiah A. Jackson, Sr. died in October 1863, occasioned by exposure on a trip through the mountains in company with the retreating Federal Army. He did not belong to the army, but thought it necessary to leave home when the Confederate forces came into Kentucky.
[Genealogy of the Lewis family in America: from the middle of the seventeenth ...; by William Terrell Lewis, 1893; pp. 373/374]

Estill Steam or Red River Steam Cold-blast Charcoal Furnace, owned by Josiah A. Jackson and J. W. Jones, managed by the latter, Redriver P.O. Estill county Kentucky, and situated on Miller's and Hardwick creek, 10 m. S.S. E. from Irvine, was built in 1830; rebuilt in 1849 10/12 feet across the bosh by 33 feet high and made in eighteen weeks of 1857 693 tons of carwheel iron out of ore mined from the surface of limestone.
[The iron manufacturer's guide to the furnaces, forges and rolling mills of the United States: with discussions of iron as a chemical element, and American ore, and a manufactured article, in commerce and in history; by J. Peter Lesley, American Iron and Steel Association, 1859; p. 126]

 

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