Summary

Benjamin C. Fox

Birth:
20 Jan 1925 1
New Orleans, Louisiana 1
More…

Related Pages

Pictures & Records (4)

Show More

Personal Details

Edit
Birth:
20 Jan 1925 1
New Orleans, Louisiana 1
Male 1
Burial:
Burial Place: Baton Rouge, Louisiana 1
Edit
Birth:
Mother: Beulah Cecile Ducote 1
Father: George Alphonse Fox 1
Marriage:
Doris Marie Keen Ygleisas 1
1953 1
To: his death 1
Edit
Occupation:
Commercial Artist-Visual Aids Supervisor 1
Military:
WWII 65th Infantry 1

Looking for more information about Benjamin C. Fox 1925-1978?

Search through millions of records to find out more.

Sources

  1. Contributed by Cecelia53

Stories

Benjamin Clifton Fox

Bemjamin Clifton Fox was born January 20, 1925 in New Orleans, Louisiana.  He was the oldest son of George Alphonse and Beuhah Ducote Fox.  After high school he attended business school, but was inducted into the army on February 5, 1944. He served with the 265th Combat Engineers with the 65 Infantry Division, General Patton's Third Army.  He saw action in Germany and Austria. He was honorably discharged from the Army in April, 1946.

He then attended Louisiana State University in Baton Rouge, Louisiana graduated in 1951 with a BS in Fine Arts.  He married Doris Keen Yglesias, a war widow with 4 children, and together they had 2 children.  He worked as a commercial artist, visual aid supervisor, graphics, etc with the Louisiana State Department until his retirment in 1972. 

He was a creative individual, conservative, who loved his family, photography, art, fishing, sunshine, modeling airplane and boat building and later in life ceramics.   

Since his late 30's he had heart trouble. An eye disease, RP, robbed him of his sight around the age of 50.  He died at the age of 53 of a heart attack.

Ben's military service is outlined in a photograph album of black and white photos from 1945 and a scrapbook of about 150 letters he wrote home.  Here is part of a letter  to the mother of Ben Fox from Captain Edward H. Ellis:

“My men have made history… from 22nd of January, 1945. In France and into Germany and Austria, our route covered 900 miles in 90 days advancing with General Patton’s Third United States Army…. guard on the bridges across the Saar River, Germany for three weeks….demolition work…..clearing roads…cross Inns River while under fire…guard soldiers of war….prepare for he peace to come….

About this Memorial Page

This page is locked. Want to contribute to this page? Contact Cecelia53

Contributors:
Cecelia53
Created:
Modified:
Page Views:
1,537 total (10 this week)

×