Summary

Abraham Lincoln became the president of the United States during the most divisive period of U.S. history.

Conflict Period:
Civil War (Union) 1
Birth:
12 Feb 1809 2
Hardin County, Kentucky 3
Death:
15 Apr 1865 1
Washington, DC 1
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Pictures & Records (175)

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B-2088 President Abraham Lincoln and his son
B-2088 President Abraham Lincoln and his son
lincoln-reward-poster.jpg
lincoln-reward-poster.jpg
todd-to-lincoln-letter.jpg
todd-to-lincoln-letter.jpg
B-4246 President Lincoln
B-4246 President Lincoln
[BLANK] Abraham Lincoln
[BLANK] Abraham Lincoln
Lincolnhearse.gif
Lincolnhearse.gif
Source: President Abraham Lincoln's hearse, Springfield. S.M. Fassett, photographer, Chicago. Library of Congress. http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/cph.3a16345
Sketch of Lincoln Assassination
Sketch of Lincoln Assassination
Source: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. 20540 USA
Lincoln, Abraham
Lincoln, Abraham
Fords_Theatre.jpg
Fords_Theatre.jpg
Source: National Archives, ARC Identifier 518224 / Local Identifier 66-G-22B(1). http://media.nara.gov/media/images/28/5/28-0477t.gif
lincdougdebate.jpg
lincdougdebate.jpg
Source: Robert Marshall Root painting of Lincoln-Douglas Debate at Charleston. http://www.lib.niu.edu/2001/iht8201111x.jpg
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Lincoln's brother-in-law Benjamin Helm served in the Confederacy, here is his Confederate Service record.
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Lincoln's brother-in-law David Todd served in the Confederate Army and applied for a pardon after the war. Here is his application from the Confederate Amnesty papers.
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David H. Todd was Lincoln's brother-in-law. Here is his Confederate Service record.
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Samuel B. Todd was Lincoln's brother-in-law. Here is his Confederate Service record.
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George R.C. Todd was Lincoln's brother-in-law and a surgeon in the Confederate Army. Here is his service record.
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AbrahamLincoln.jpg
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Gettysburg Address
First Photo of Abraham Lincoln.jpg
First Photo of Abraham Lincoln.jpg
Priscilla hanks Martin Testimonial
Priscilla hanks Martin Testimonial
This appeared in a 1904 Newspaper in Wisconsin and was saved by my Grandfather Clifton Roscoe Martin.

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Personal Details

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Full Name:
Abraham Lincoln 3
Also known as:
Honest Abe 3
Birth:
12 Feb 1809 2
Hardin County, Kentucky 2
Male 2
Death:
15 Apr 1865 3
Washington, DC 3
Cause: Gunshot Wound 3
Burial:
Burial Place: Springfield, Illinois 3
Residence:
Place: Spencer County, Indiana 4
From: 1816 4
To: 1830 4
Edit
Birth:
Mother: Nancy Hanks Lincoln 2
Father: Thomas Lincoln 2
Marriage:
Mary Todd 2
04 Nov 1842 2
Springfield, Illinois 2
To: 15 Apr 1865 2
Edit
Occupation:
Lawyer, Politician 3
Lincoln's Patent:
Date awarded: 22 May 1849 2
Invention: A levy device that could lift boats over sandbars in the Mississippi River 2
Patent Number: 6,469 2
Abraham Lincoln is re-elected president:
08 Nov 1864 2
Approves the Federal Homestead Law:
20 May 1862 2
Authorizes suspension of the Writ of Habeas Corpus:
27 Apr 1861 2
Civil War Begins:
12 Apr 1861 2
Elected 16th U.S. president and first Republican:
06 Nov 1860 2
Gen. Robert E. Lee surrenders, Civil War ends:
09 Apr 1865 2
Inauguration ceremonies in Washington, DC:
04 Mar 1861 2
Issues the final Emancipation Proclamation:
01 Jan 1863 2
President Lincoln delivers the Gettysburg Address:
19 Nov 1863 2
Shot by John Wilkes Booth at Ford’s Theate:
14 Apr 1865 2
Son Willie dies at age 11:
20 Feb 1862 2
Abraham Lincoln is granted U.S. Patent No. 6,469:
22 May 1849 2
Admitted to practice in U. S. Circuit Courts:
03 Dec 1839 2
Becomes a candidate for Illinois General Assembly:
March 1832 2
Douglas elected for the U.S. Senate over Lincoln:
1859 2
Edward Baker Lincoln is born:
10 Mar 1846 2
Elected to the U.S. House of Representatives:
03 Aug 1846 2
First child, Robert Todd Lincoln, is born:
01 Aug 1843 2
Helps organize the new Republican party:
29 May 1856 2
Lincoln Douglas Debates begin:
August 1858 2
Lincoln Family moves to Illinois:
March 1830 2
Lincoln's father dies:
17 Jan 1851 2
Loses the election for Illinois General Assembly:
06 Aug 1832 2
Moves on his own to New Salem, Illinois:
1831 2
Nominated as Republican candidate for President:
18 May 1860 2
Receives his Law license:
09 Sep 1836 2
Serves as a captain during Black Hawk War:
April 1832 2
Son Edward dies after a two month illness:
01 Feb 1850 2
Thomas (Tad) is born:
04 Apr 1853 2
William Wallace Lincoln (Willie) is born:
21 Dec 1850 2
Wins the election for Illinois General Assembly:
04 Aug 1834 2

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Stories

Lincoln’s Brothers-in-Law Fought Hard for the Confederate Cause

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Abraham Lincoln was born in Kentucky, as was his wife Mary Todd Lincoln. Mary’s family, however, came from wealth and education, and participated in Kentucky’s high social circles. When the Civil War broke out, her brother, half-brothers, and brothers-in-law fought for the Confederacy, despite their relation to President Lincoln.

            Mary’s brother-in-law, Benjamin Hardin Helm, was friends with President Lincoln. Lincoln offered the national post of Paymaster to Helm when the war broke out, but Benjamin sided with the Confederacy and abandoned Lincoln. Benjamin Helm led the “Orphan Brigade,” the 1st Kentucky Infantry, until he was killed at the Battle of Chickamauga on September 20, 1863. Despite Helm’s betrayal, Lincoln wept at the news of his death.

            George R.C. Todd was Mary’s only full-brother to serve in the Confederate Army. He worked as a doctor prior to the Civil War, and joined the Army as a surgeon. George worked in the field of battle until September 1863, when he was transferred to the General Hospital in Charleston, South Carolina. During his service at the hospital, George was accused of harsh treatment towards Union prisoners. In December 1864, he was placed in charge of the Wayside Hospital in Camden, South Carolina, until General Sherman passed through and burned the town in February 1865. George Todd survived the war and died in 1900.

            Samuel Briggs Todd and Alexander Todd were Mary Todd’s half-brothers from her father’s second marriage. Samuel Todd served in Company F, of the Louisiana Crescent Regiment. Samuel died during the Battle of Shiloh on April 7, 1862, from a wound in the abdomen. Alexander Todd, called “Aleck” by Mary, served in Benjamin Helm’s 1st Kentucky Calvary regiment. He was killed during the Battle of Baton Rouge on August 5, 1863. It is recorded that when Mary Lincoln heard the news of his death she cried, “Oh, little Aleck, why had you too to die!” 

            David H. Todd, also Mary’s half-brother, was a captain in the 21st Louisiana Infantry and commandant of the Libby Prison in Richmond, Virginia. David was wounded in the Battle of Vicksburg, but survived the war. He later applied for, and was granted a presidential pardon by Andrew Johnson for his actions during the war.

            The Lincoln family did not escape the pain and division that affected so many families during the Civil War. Along with her brothers, several of Mary Todd’s sisters were married to Confederate soldiers. Abraham Lincoln was friends with these men, they were family, and yet they fought on opposite sides and died for opposing causes.

 

Sources:

http://www.geocities.com/20scvi/medical/todd.html

http://www.firstladies.org/biographies/firstladies.aspx?biography=17

http://www.kylincoln.org/lincoln/rebel.htm

Added by Clio

America will never be destroyed from the outside. If we falter and lose our freedoms, it will be because we destroyed ourselves. --Abraham Lincoln

Added by Clio

George Todd

Camden, South Carolina

Dr. GeorgeTodd

This person George R. C. Todd is buried at Quaker Cemetery in Camden South Carolina

yes,you are right.

Abe Lincoln defending my Gr.x3 Grandmother

Metamora, IL.

Through my geneology research I learned I had a Great, Great, Great Grandmother, named Monica Melissa Lett Goings. She was married to Roswell Goings for many years and as the story goes, he would beat on her whenever he had too much to drink.  Back in those times, this was acceptable behavior....after many years of taking these beatings, Monica had had enough, (at age 70ish) and picked up a piece of firewood and hit him in the head.  The towns people came to her defense, but to no avail and they tried her for murder!  Abe Lincoln was her attorney.  There is a wonderful essay about this, written by Jean Myers of Metamora, Illinois.  I was given permission to use this in my family ancestory.  Also they just had a dedication to Lincoln, in Metamora, and bronze figures sculpted by John McClarey were made in the likeness of Abe and Monica...My family used the name of Roswell for many years, from great uncles to my father, who was named Leonides Roswell to my brother, Gregory Roswell...I am very proud of my grandmother and what she went through and that she finally did take a stand for herself.  I am sorry it ended in my grandfather's death....but it could have ended in Monica's death, many times prior to this, I think.  Leah (LaVeta Sills) Kirk

Abraham Lincoln must be the greatest president of all time Happy Birthday Abe!!!!!!!

He was a stand-up guy, thoughtful. Workaholic too, wow, always busy with that whole running the country thing. Always had something funny to say. Talked to him at a party just last week. It's hard to believe he's really gone...

In my opinion, he was the greatest president. I also wish to add a little feedback about David H. Todd. Due to popular belief, David never was the commandant of Libby prison in Richmond. Prior to him being in the 21st Louisiana he served in the 1st Kentucky infantry. After the regiment was in the battle of Dranesville, Virginia it was assigned to provost duty at Orange Courthouse Virginia. David was nothing more than a guard at 1 of the prisons.

The Conspiracy

Washington DC

On April 14, 1865, Abraham Lincoln became the first president of the United States to be assassinated. John Wilkes Booth, famous actor and assassin, is the first person to come to mind when we think about the death of the tall, top-hatted president. But Lincoln’s assassination was part of a larger conspiracy, one that would attempt to overthrow the Union and bring victory to the nearly quashed Confederate cause.

Originally a more forgiving plan, Booth’s idea was to kidnap the president and give him release only when the imprisoned Confederate soldiers were allowed to return home. But war-related events and Booth’s fury over abolition and the situation with the prisoners of war caused the plot to become more sinister in nature. After hearing of Lee’s surrender at Appomattox, Booth’s thoughts turned to assassination. On April 14, 1865, upon learning that Lincoln would attend Our American Cousin at Ford’s theater later that night, Booth met with co-conspirators Lewis Powell, David Herold, and George Atzerodt, and gave to them their murderous assignments.

Lewis Thornton Powell, alias Lewis Payne or Paine. On April 14, around 10:00 p.m., Lewis Powell made his way to the home of Secretary of State William H. Seward with the intent to murder. He was accompanied by David Herold, who was to show him the way out of the city after Powell’s task was completed. Powell gained entry into the home by announcing that he had medicine for Seward, who had recently been in a carriage accident and had suffered broken bones and a concussion, from which he was still healing. Powell pistol-whipped Seward’s son, then forced his way into the bedroom and repeatedly stabbed Seward around the face and neck. Seward’s jaw splint was perhaps the only thing that saved him from death that night, deflecting the blade away from his jugular vein. Powell also injured another of Seward’s sons, Seward’s nurse, and then as he made his escape, a messenger who was just arriving at the house. He was able to hide out for three days, then had the unfortunate luck of returning to Mary Surratt’s boarding house at the exact moment that she was being arrested for her part in the assassination. Powell was also arrested.

David Herold. Reportedly a simple-minded man who was easily led, David Herold probably got himself in over his head with his part in Booth’s scheme. He was instructed to act as Powell’s guide to and from the Seward home, but when he heard the screaming from within the house during the assassination attempt, he became frightened and fled without waiting for Powell. Booth, by this time, had already made his way across the bridge into Maryland, and Herold met with him there. The two then evaded arrest together, Herold helping the injured Booth along the way until the law caught up with them near Port Royal, Virginia, in the barn of of Richard Garrett. Booth was shot and killed, but Herold surrendered and was taken into custody.

George Atzerodt. At first entirely willing to join in the original kidnapping plot, Atzerodt’s feelings about the conspiracy changed when it became an assassination. He was assigned to murder Vice President Andrew Johnson, who was staying at the Kirkwood House. Atzerodt booked the room above Johnson’s, but could not muster up the courage to kill the vice president. The pre-planned hour of 10:00 p.m. found Atzerodt at the hotel bar, drowning his nerves in drink.  Atzerodt then left the hotel and spent the night wandering the streets of the city. The next day, after news of Lincoln’s assassination had circulated, suspicions about Atzerodt were roused when police heard that he had been asking about Johnson the day before. His room was searched and weapons were found. Atzerodt was arrested April 20th.

All three men were tried by a military tribunal and sentenced to death by hanging, as was boarding house owner Mary Surratt. The execution was carried out on July 7, 1865.

(source: http://spotlights.fold3.com/2012/04/13/the-conspiracy/)

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