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Stories of Iowa enlistees and their ancestors.

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Civil War (Union) 1
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Isaac W Detwiler Civil War
Isaac W Detwiler Civil War
Died from wounds 1863
Detwiler, Isaac W.
Detwiler, Isaac W.
Detwiler, John W.
Detwiler, John W.
John Detwiler, Bonapart Iowa.png
John Detwiler, Bonapart Iowa.png
Page 329
Page 329
Union Captain George M Detwiler Civil War letter
Union Captain George M Detwiler Civil War letter
Waterloo Al, 1865. George relies faith taught to him by parents to carry him through the war. This is only a few days after participating in Sherman's March to the Sea. Describes Union burning of Corinth, MS after General L. S. Ross had left.
George M Detwiler letter Corinth, MS burning description Civil War
George M Detwiler letter Corinth, MS burning description Civil War
Waterloo Al, 1865. George relies faith taught to him by parents to carry him through the war. This is only a few days after participating in Sherman's March to the Sea. Describes Union burning of Corinth, MS after General L. S. Ross had left.
Detwiler Civil War Envelopes
Detwiler Civil War Envelopes
These envolpes are over 140 years old and still preserved by family member. The top one is from George M. Detwiler 1864 and the bottom from Issac W Detwiler 1862 shortly after his enlistment and just before his death from war wounds.
Issac Detwiler Civil War letter.jpg
Issac Detwiler Civil War letter.jpg
page 2 Issac Detwiler Civil War letter.jpg
page 2 Issac Detwiler Civil War letter.jpg
page 3 Issac Detwiler Civil War letter.jpg
page 3 Issac Detwiler Civil War letter.jpg
Page 4 Issac Detwiler Civil War letter.jpg
Page 4 Issac Detwiler Civil War letter.jpg
John and Cynthia Baird Detwiler
John and Cynthia Baird Detwiler
Fom locket owner by Harriet Akers Detwiler
Cynthia Baird Detwiler
Cynthia Baird Detwiler
Mother to Hattie Akers, wife of John Detwiler. Born 1803, near Ripley Ohio of John and Ursula Burgess Baird
Hattie Detwiler signature 1858, Elmwood Iowa
Hattie Detwiler signature 1858, Elmwood Iowa
George M. Detwiler.JPG
George M. Detwiler.JPG
Sherman's Horseman Union Calvary--GM Detwiler.png
Sherman's Horseman Union Calvary--GM Detwiler.png
Detwiler, George M.
Detwiler, George M.
Geo M Detwiler Civil War letter January 1864
Geo M Detwiler Civil War letter January 1864
Faith carries him through evils of war.
George M Detwiler Civil War letter
George M Detwiler Civil War letter
Describes how his faith carries him through the horrors of war
Lua Akers Dancey & her Mother, Hattie Detwiler Akers, and Daughter, Alice Dancey
Lua Akers Dancey & her Mother, Hattie Detwiler Akers, and Daughter, Alice Dancey
Detwiler Farm, Bonaparte Iowa.png
Detwiler Farm, Bonaparte Iowa.png
Dr. Douglas Winfield Detwiler
Dr. Douglas Winfield Detwiler
Son of Isaac W. Detwiler
Harriet Elizabeth Detwiler Akers
Harriet Elizabeth Detwiler Akers
Rudolph Detweiler mark.jpg
Rudolph Detweiler mark.jpg
Melchior Detweiler property
Melchior Detweiler property
Tulpehocken, Berks County, PA
Melchior Detweiler Homestead
Melchior Detweiler Homestead
In it is abandoned. This was in the Northkill area.
Melchior and Rudolph Detweiler p3
Melchior and Rudolph Detweiler p3
by Virigl Detweiler, Mennoite Family History April 1984
Melchior and Rudolph Detweiler p1
Melchior and Rudolph Detweiler p1
by Virigl Detweiler, Mennoite Family History April 1984
Melchior and Rudolph Detweiler p2
Melchior and Rudolph Detweiler p2
by Virigl Detweiler, Mennoite Family History April 1984
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1804:
2 Jacob Detwiler die in Franklin County 1

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Stories

Captain George M Detwiler, Sherman's March to the Sea

Atlanta, Ga

George M. Detwiler.JPG
8 images

George M. Detwiler was born in Fayette Co., Pa., Sept. 19, 1834 and died at his home near Mulhall, Oklahoma, Feb 17th , 1907, at 1:15 P.M.. Mr. Detwiler was united in marriage to Miss Catherine Phillips in Oct. 22, 1854 and went to Bonaparte, Iowa. Laying aside personal interests, he enlisted July 23, 1863 in Company C, 8th Iowa Calvary. For two years and two months he served in the Union Army. At Davenport, Iowa he was promoted to be Orderly Sergeant and at Chattanooga he was made a second Lieutenant. He took part in various battles and skirmishes in and around Franklin and Waverly, Tn. and in the battle of Dalton his clothing was riddled with bullets. He accompanied Gen. Sherman from Chattanooga to Atlanta on the famous march to the sea. Altogether he took part in about thirty battles, and skirmishes. Upon returning from service Captain Detwiler returned to his old home in Van Buren Co. Iowa. In 1890 he came from Kansas to Oklahoma and settled at the place in which he died. His wife servives[sic] him and the following children, Charles, living at home; Cynthia, living at home, Mrs. Sadie Daniels lives in Garfield, Kansas; George lives on a joining farm at his father's. Daniel, living in Billings, Ok., Mrs. Kate James living at Apache, Mrs. Gertrude Bowers living near Guthrie, J.H. Detwiler a brother of St. John, Kansas, all present at the funeral. Neighbors and friends acted as pall bearers, while veterans of the Civil War as honorary pall bearers followed the remains of their comrade to the grave.

The following are excerpts from Iowa and the Rebellion, By Lurton Dunham Ingersoll The next day, the battle of Newnan took place. About noon, the head of the column, upon entering Newnan, unexpectedly came upon Roddy's dismounted cavalry on their way to Atlanta. Wheeler's force soon coming up, the enemy barred our progress with a largely superior army. Croxton's Brigade, however, charged, and the Eighth Cavalry, one portion under Major Root, and another portion under Major Isett, forced the enemy to give way in confusion. General Hume, commanding a brigade, was captured by Lieutenant George M. Detwiler, of Company M, and the road was cleared, but the rest of the division not coming up, the rebels had time to rally, and again blockaded the passage. The fight continued for some time, being sustained by the first brigade alone, which was now commanded by Colonel Dorr, Croxton being missing, and which brigade had been reduced to little more than the maximum number of a company. And so the little band fought on, making itself a shield to protect the rest of our forces, the most of whom were thereby enabled to extricate themselves from the perilous position. They made their way back to the army, but Colonel Dorr and his regiment fell into the hands of the enemy.

"In this engagement," said he, in his report made months afterwards, "which was of the severest character, the men and officers of the Eighth behaved with a gallantry and steadiness which drew from General McCook a public compliment on the battlefield. As on the day before, there were but few exceptions to this, while there were many instances of great gallantry displayed. Major John H. Isett, Captain P. C. Morhiser, Captain (now Major) Shurtz, who was desperately wounded, Captain James W. Moore, captain E. B. Doane, Lieutenants Henry Moreland, W. F. McCarron, C. F. Anderson, Jackson Morrow, W. T. Ogle, G. M. Detwiler, Jacob T. Haight (wounded) and John B. Loomis (killed) are fairly entitled to 'mention for coolness and good conduct under very trying circumstances.

George's attached letters reveal that he was a man of faith and that he participated in the burning of Coronth, MS.  They burned a college there.   Corinth was not demolished, but it was very much deteriorated- about as bad as the Corinth of old. In the town the scene was dismal indeed; nothing was occupied, all was vacant. In the fields north of the town, where the Confederate camps had been, there were the common evidences of their late presence, but nothing uncommon. Arms were picked up in all parts of the field, and a few hundred prisoners were taken.
Source: Frank Leslie, Famous Leaders and Battle Scenes of the Civil War (New York: Mrs. Frank Leslie, 1896)

Isaac Winfield and Clarence Smith Detwiler

Iowa

Detwiler, Isaac W.
10 images

 John and Cynthia's three others sons served, too

Isaac W Detwiler , Residence: Bonaparte, Iowa Enlistment Date: 19 August 1862 Distinguished Service: Side Served: Union State Served: Iowa Unit Numbers: 205 205 Service Record: Enlisted as a Corporal on 19 August 1862 at the age of 22
Enlisted in Company D, 30th Infantry Regiment Iowa on 31 August 1862.
Promoted to Full Sergeant 5th Class on 23 September 1862, He fought in the first battle of Vicksburg, MS in December of 1862.

Wounded on 11 January 1863 at Arkansas Post, AR (Wounded severely)
Died of wounds Company D, 30th Infantry Regiment Iowa  on 24 January 1863

Isaac's grandsons and great grandsons continued the military tradition.  Douglas Detwiler was son to Emma C and Isaac W Detwiler.

Monterey Peninsula Herald, CA Sept 18, 1961  Douglas Winfield Detwiler, MD, father of the late Col. H.P. Detwiler of Monterey, died Saturday night at the home of his daughter-in-law Margaret A. Detwiler, at 20 Sierra Vista Dr., Monterey. Dr. Detwiler, a retired physician, passed his 100th birthday Aug 19. He was born in 1861 on a farm near Bonaparte, Iowa. He obtained his medical degree at the University of Iowa in 1889. he married Frances Putnam in 1890 and the couple had three children, two daughters who died in infancy, and a son, Col. Detwiler, who died in 1952. Dr. Detwiler practiced in Moravia and Oskaloosa, Iowa, and then at El Paso, Texas for 14 years. He also served on the staff of the Veterans hospital at Tucson, Ariz., for 11 years. Following the death of his wife in 1943, Dr. Detwiler lived with his son and daughter-in-law. He is survived by two grandchildren, Lt. Col. R.P. Detwiler of San Antonio, Texas, and Col. D.A. Detwiler of Long island, N.Y.; three great granddaughters, and one great grandson. Private funeral services will be held tomorrow at 11 a.m. at the Little Chapel-by-the-Sea with Chaplain George L. Lutz officiating. Burial will be in the family plot at Forest Lawn Memorial Park, Glendale. The Paul Mortuary [Pacific Grove] is in charge of local arrangements.

  Clarence S Detwiler , : DISTINGUISHED SERVICE Side Served: Union State Served: Iowa Unit Numbers: 180 Service Record: Enlisted as a Private Rejected Company C, 8th Cavalry Regiment Iowa  on 15 August 1863

 

John and Cynthia Baird Detwiler

Pennsylvania to Iowa

John Detwiler, Bonapart Iowa.png
6 images

JOHN DETWILER was born 1805 in Strasburg, PA, and died 1884 in Bonaparte, IA. His family moved to Fayette County, PA in 1812.  His father died here in 1823. After his father died he returned to Franklin County and was apprenticed to a tanner and was a member of the Franklin County Rangers. When his apprenticeship was finished he returned to Fayette County by foot, stopping near Uniontown. He located his log cabin and first tannery by Indian Creek. Later he added a sawmill.

He married CYNTHIA BAIRD 1832 in Perryopolis, PA, daughter of JOHN BAIRD and URSULA. BURGESS. She was born 1808 in Near Ripley, OH  and died 1877 in Bonaparte, IA.  Cynthia Baird's mother's family is descended from William Coale who was in Jamestown in 1617.  The Burgess and allied families settled very early in Virginia and Maryland.  The Bairds were probably Scotch Irish immigrants--coming to the colonies about 1720.

For twenty-six years he active in the community and Flatwood Baptist Church. However, 1852 he felt the urge to move westward again. They went as far as Zanesville, Ohio and settled in a little town named Adamsville. These were disappointing years and in 1854 he again felt the urge to go westward. In Wheeling, West Virginia they boarded a riverboat on the Ohio River to the Mississippi to Hannibal Missouri. From there they went north in search of farming land in Iowa.  He and Cynthia Baird had seven children. Three sons fought in the civil war.

John Detwiler Obituary, 08 April 1884   Born at Strasburg, Franklin Co., Pennsylvania, John Detwiler was the second son of Henry and Mary Detwiler.   At the age of 23 years he crossed the Allegheny Mountains on foot and settled in Fayette Co., Pa. and here near the city of Perryopolis he married Miss Cynthia Baird at the age of 27 years. These two walked together 46 years when she hastened home and left him alone. This parting occured on Dec 10, 1877.

When they left Fayette county, they settled in Muskingkum county, Ohio, in 1852, from thence they came to Van Buren County in 1855.

Mr. Detwiler was the father of seven children, four sons and three daughters. (Words unreadable) Isaac W. and Clarence S. have gone on before. There remain John H., George M., M. Frank Sedgwick, Lucy A. Miller and (Hattie) E. Akers.He was converted under the teaching of Rev. Wm. Wood and with his wife was baptized into the Baptist Church by Rev. Benoni Allen in 1835.On his removal to this place, he united with Mt. Zion, now the Bonaparte Baptist Church.

Although since the death of his wife, he had lived alternately with Mrs. Sedgwick and Mrs. Akers, his church relations never changed. His demise was not unexpected. (Words unreadable) for often he expressed himself as "ready and only waiting the masters's call." He had unbounded confidence in God and the promises of his word. A few hours before he crossed the river of death as by faith he viewed the prospect, he shouted again and again "Hallelujah, I am going home." 

Cynthia Baird DETWILER’s obituary--In Bonaparte, December 10, 1877, from slow consumption, Mrs. Cynthia Detwiler, wife of John Detwiler, aged 69 years, 2 months and 7 days. Mother Detwiler's name was originally Cynthia Baird. She was the daughter of John and Ursula Baird and was born October 3, 1808 near Ripley, Ohio. At the age of 5, she removed with her parents to Washington county, Pennsylvania and subsequently to Fayette County of the same state. Here, near the city of Perryopolis, she was married to John Detwiler, January 19, 1832, being 23 years of age, so that she lived with her husband nearly 46 years. She was the mother of seven children, 4 sons and three daughters, all of whom survive with the exception of her son, Isaac, who died in the Army and was buried in Elmwood Cemetery at Memphis, Tennessee.


Mrs. Detwiler was converted together with her husband, in 1835 under the preaching of Rev. Wm. Wood and they were baptized by the Rev. Benoni Allen. They became two of the nine constituent members of the Flatwoods Baptist Church of Fayette county, Pennsylvania. In 1852, the removed to Adamsville, Ohio, and from there to this place in 1855, uniting themselves with Mt. Zion, now Bonaparte Baptist Church. For ten years, the family resided in Harrisburg township and for twelve years they have lived in the town of Bonaparte. The original cause of Mrs. Detwiler's sickness seems to have been a severe cold taken fourteen years ago while on a mission of mercy to the sick. This settled in her lungs and she was never entirely well afterward s. She doubtless inherited a tendency to her disease, for her mother was also for fourteen years an invalid with the same complaint.


Her departure was long looked for by herself and her friends, and she often expressed her readiness to go, and recently she has longed to depart as she expressed it "to her home". Five weeks ago, she thought herself dying. Her friends gathered at her bedside, and she gave them her parting words. But she revived again and she has been patiently waiting at the river's bank. Early last Monday morning, she sweetly "fell asleep" without a struggle, none being present except her husband and two daughters. She exhibited no signs of change until two munites before she was gone.


As one remarked, "The angel of death smoothed every look of pain and sorrow, leaving her face calm anb serene, and telling to those left behind what true religion can do for the dying. We need not dwell upon her Christian character, standing, for they are well known in this community, and the respect in which she has been held has been manifested better than any words of ours could express it by the number in attendance at her funeral.

John and Cynthia's daughter,  HARRIET Elizabeth DETWILER (JOHN2, HENRY1) was born 1847 in Fayette County, Pennsylvania, and died 1916 in Chicago. She married MARION WESLEY AKERS 1876, son of SPENCER AKERS and ELIZABETH ADER. He was born 1849 in Grundy, Missouri

Decatur County Journal
Thursday, April l3, l9l6

MRS. M.W. AKERS, a former resident of this county, passed away at her home in Chicago on March 29th, and was laid to rest in Mount Hope Cemetery at three o'clock on April 2. MR. and MRS. AKERS will be remembered by many of our people and especially by the residents of the community in which they made their home when in Iowa.

HARRIET ELIZA DETWILER AKERS was born February l4, l847, in Fayette County, Penn. She came west to Van Buren County, Iowa, at the age of seven years. She was married to M.W. AKERS on October l, l876. All extend sympathy to the bereaved ones. MRS. AKERS is an aunt of C.O. ANDREW and ARTHUR ANDREW, of Leon.

 Mrs. Hattie E. Akers, IL, died at her home Wednesday, March 29th, 1916 of pneumonia. She was ill 9 days and then peacefully passed away.
She was the youngest daughter of John Detwiler, one  of the pioneer settlers of Van Buren county.  Born in Fayette county, Pennsylvania in 1848.  Was 7 years old when she came with the family to Iowa and settled 3 miles north of Bonaparte.
She was married October 1st, 1876 to M. W. Akers, then pastor of the Harrisburg church. To this union 3 children were born:  M. Frank, a jeweler in Lewiston, ID., Dwight L. assistant secretary, City Club, Chicago; and Lou M., wife of Rev. Jesse Dancey, pastor of Englewood M. E. church.  Besides these she was a "good litle mother" to D. C. Akers, a step-son, discounting a hundred-fold the oft unjust insinuations against "the step-mother."
Mrs. Akers was a woman of fine intelligence, superior judgment and rare tact that fitted her for the difficult position of a pastor's wife.  Her good humor and kind heart made her much beloved by all who knew her and her death will be a source of sorrow to her many friends throughout the country.

Lucy A. Detwiler was born near Uniontown, Fayette Co., Penn., March 25, 1845. When she was six years of age the family removed to Adamsville, Muskingum county, Ohio and from there to Bentonsport, Iowa, in April 1854. She was married Oct. 18, 1863 to George W. Miller who departed this life May 30, 1896, aged 59 years and 10 mos.

Mrs. Miller was the mother of nine children, seven of whom are living, Mrs. Hattie E. Morris, Mrs. M. Franc Hixon, John C., George M., James M., and Ray P. Miller of this vicinity; also Hugh H. Miller of Branson, Kansas. She also leaves four grand-daughters, two brothers and two sisters.

John Henry Detwiler s/o John and Cynthia Detwiler b 3 Nov 1832 near city of Perryopolis, Fayette Co., Pa. d 6 Nov 1911 age 78 yr 3 da.  Moved with parents to Ohio Jan 1852, to Iowa 1855 to St. John, Kansas 1886.  Married Cordelia H. McComb at Birmingham, 3 Aug 1857.  Five children born, three survives him.  William and Lucy at home, Mrs. Ella Prindle of Greencastle, Missouri. Leaves wife, son, two daughters and two sisters.

 

 

Mary Magdalena Lie and Henry Detwiler

Pennsylvania

Although John's 1880 census record says his parents were born in Holland--this would be a misinterpretation of Pennsylvania Dutch, as that is what they were.  Henry, John’s father,  was born to Swiss or German parents in Pennsylvania.   There were three or four Mennonite immigrants in the area of Franklin County 1760-1800 whose surname was a variation of Detwiler.  Henry's wife, MARY MAGDALENA, was also born in Pennsylvania to German Lutheran parents.

John had three known brothers and three sisters--Jacob, Samuel, Henry, Catharine, Mary and Harriet.  Henry appears in Lurgan PA 1800 with one boy under ten, one about 16 and a woman 26-44.  Either this was a wife before Magdalena or other family members as he does not appear to have married Magdalena until 1801.   In Letterkenny in the 1810 census, Henry had 4 males under ten, 2 that were 10 through 15 years of age.  I believe the older boys were either sons that were not known or nephews.  The only female was Henry's wife.  He purchased 2 lots of land in 1802 and 2 more in 1810.

In 1812, they removed to Fayette County, and settled in the Redstone settlement near Cookstown.  Henry died 1823.  He is found in 1820 in the township of Franklin, Fayette County and Mary is found with one daughter in the same place in 1830. 

Henry

 Based on Jacob being the name of Henry Detwiler's oldest known son b.1802, there is reason to consider the possibility of Henry's connection to men named Jacob Detwiler who resided near him in 1800. A deed shows that Michael Nave of Dauphin County sold to a Jacob Detwiler 340 acres of land in Letterkenny Township. Henry Detwiler is living in this very area in 1800 and 1810.

Jacob (1) was the son of Rudolph Detweiler, whose father was Melchior.  Rudolph also had a son Henry born about 1771 in Berks County.  This Jacob, born c. 1765, died in 1804 in Franklin County.  In the most likely scenario he was Henry's brother, making Henry a descendant of Rudolph and Melchior.  In 1800 census our Henry has a boy under 10 living with him whose name is not known.

Henry's children were baptised in Salem Lutheran church in Pleasant Hall and several were baptised as adults in the Baptist Church.  This could mean Henry left the Mennonite community by marrying out of the faith.  Many Mennonites descendants did drift away from the sect and it is very likely this is what happened in Henry's case.  This is born out by the fact that Magdalena Detweiler appears several times as a confirmand of the Salem church but Henry never does.

Maria Rith/Rieth/Roth was the sponsor for Henry and Magdalena’s daughter Anna Maria, b. 1810. The Rieth family had removed from Berks County to Letterkenny, however, a cousin still lived very close to Rudolph in the 1790 Census.  This could be Henry's connection to Berks County.

Jacob (2) arrived in Philadelphia aboard the Brothers with a large group of Mennonites  in 1754, aged 21. He settled at Cocalico Township, Lancaster County, Pennsylvania. His brother, Jost, arrived in 1764 on the Hero and Jost died intestate in 1777 in Lancaster County, leaving a widow and some children.   Jacob was the administrator of Jost's estate. 

Jacob was taxed at Cocalico Township in 1758 and in 1759 as a single man. He was taxed at Cocalico from 1769 to 1793. He and his wife, Anna Moyer, were of Earl Township when they sold their land there on 7 April 1796. They were living at Cocalico Township next to Jacob Hage with one male under age 16 and four females in 1790. He is probably the Jacob Detweiler who bought 200 acres in Montgomery Township, Franklin County, Pennsylvania on 4 November 1795. Jacob Detweiler Sr. of Montgomery Township sold 150 acres on 24 December 1803. He had died at Montgomery Township, Franklin County by 12 March 1804 as letters of administration were issued to his sons, Jacob and John Detweiler. (Emmigrants, Refugees and Prisoners; Richard Warren Davis, Vol. III, p. 63-64).   However, a Henry is never mentioned as the son of either man. .

One final possiblity for his father is Jacob Deweiler who married Barbara Shirk.  They did have a son named Henry, b. 1775.    However, they too were Mennonites and do not appear in Franklin county.

 

Magdalena

 John Lie and his wife, Margreda, were sponsors at the baptism of Henry and Magalena Detweiler's son, Henry.  I believe it is almost certain that Henry's wife is John's sister, the daughter of Casper and Sophia Lie/Lay/Lei/Lee/Ley.  Casper and his family were in Lurgan township (later Southampton) by 1776.   They appear many times on the confirmand and communicant rolls of Salems Evangical Reformed Lutheran Church in Pleasant Hall with the surname as LIE.  Magdalina Lie appears in 1799 and 1801.  Magdalina Detwiler appears in 1802, 1804/1805 and 1811.  One of John Lay's brothers, Christopher, named a daugther Harriet Lucinda as did Henry and Magdalena.  Also George Schaller and his wife, Barbara, were sponsors at baptism of at least five of Casper's children and at the baptism of Henry's and Magdalena's son, John Detweiler, in 1805.. 

George Shaller witnessed Caspar Ley's will.   It is speculated that Sophia Lay was a Schaller.  Casper Lay bought property in Letterkenny in 1791 very near or exactly where Henry is recorded as owning property in 1806.  This property would be located near the North Mountain just north of Upper Strasburg.  Casper Shaller was Capar's Lay's next door neighbor in 1790.  A Caspar Schaller immigrated on the Queen Elizabeth in 1738 and a George Casper Schaller was naturalized in 1743 in Berks County.  I believe these were Sophia's father and brother.  Both the Lays and the Shallers lived first near New Hanover Lutheran Church and then in Heidelberg before arriving in Southampton.  Caspar Ley served in the Reveloutionary War.

Ley inlaws, the Koppenhaver's, also had connections to Tulpehocken, Berks, where Rudolph Detweiler lived.  The Koppenhaver family had also intermarried with the Rith family.  Benjamin Koppenhaver/Copenhaver was executor of Caspar Ley's will.

Melchior and Rudolph Detweiler

Philadelphia

Rudolph Detweiler mark.jpg
6 images

The first Amish Mennonites began migrating to the United States in the eighteenth century, mainly to escape the religious persecution and compulsory military service they faced in Europe. The Northkill area in eastern Pennsylvania was opened for settlement in 1736, and that same year, Melchoir Detweiler and Hans Sieber arrived in Philadelphia on the ship Princess Augusta.   Detweiler found land along Northkill Creek. Rudolph is listed on Berks Co Tax lists for 1767, 1768, and 1779 as owner of a grist mill. He remained Amish and is buried on Noah Detweiler farm on Rt. 655 a mile west of Allensville, Mifflin Co. PA

A chapter of Hostetler's AMISH ROOTS is taken from an article in MENNONITE FAMILY HISTORY (April 1984) pp 73-74 by Virgil Detweiler. The article is called "Melchior Detweiler and Son Rudolph, 1736 Immigrants."

"Melchior Detweiler, age 37, and his family landed in Philadelphia to face severe disappointment. Their goods had been seized by the customs officers and sold, and the money was forwarded to the British government. The family had traded their old utensils for better ones as they traveled on the Rhine to Rotterdam, and appear to have acquired large quantities of wares; for example, 20 iron pans, 30 stoves, 590 scythes, and, astonishingly, 8 flutes...."


"The goods which they attempted to bring to this country were subject to seizure as English law did not allow ANY goods,other than certain amounts of clothing and household goods,from any country except England to be brought into the American colonies."

"It was with this calamity that Melchior Detweiler, age 37, and family were greeted on their arrival in Philadelphia on Sept. 16, 1736, on the ship "Princess Augusta." Melchior made his "X" marka on the shiplist as did many others. Inasmuch as the goods had been freely exposed on the trip from Rotterdam and during her landing at the port of Cowes in Great Britain, without payment of any duty or taxes, according to a portion of a petition for relief quoted, the Detweilers were unprepared for the financial calamity of having a large quantity of goods seized and declared forfeit.

Melchior and his family migrated to the outer limits of civilization at the foot of the Pennsylvania Blue Mountains. It is not known who his wife was. In 1744 he received a warrant for 263 acres in what was then Lancaster County, later to be Berks. The survey for his land in Tulpehocken is recorded in book C43, p170. He later deeded a portion of this land to son Rudolph, Rowdy, which is recorded in Book B1, p83. Rowdy named his portion Hopewell.

Rudolph died in 1797 and it is not known who was the mother of his children. He left an estate valued at 1949 pounds. His son, Henry, received 199 pounds. Mary Magdalena Ley, Henry’s wife, would have received 100 pounds from her father’s estate at the same time. So it is likely they used these monies to establish themselves in Franklin County.

 

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