Summary

The second President of the United States of America.

Birth:
30 Oct 1735 1
Braintree, Massachusetts 2
Death:
04 Jul 1826 3
Quincy, Massachusetts 4
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Pictures & Records (9)

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Personal Details

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Full Name:
John Adams, Jr. 3
Also known as:
John Adams 3
Birth:
30 Oct 1735 1
Braintree, Massachusetts 1
Male 1
Death:
04 Jul 1826 2
Quincy, Massachusetts 2
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Birth:
Mother: Susanna Boylston 1
Father: John Adams 1
Marriage:
Abigail Smith 1
25 Oct 1764 1
Weymouth, Massachusetts 1
Spouse Death Date: 1818 1
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Occupation:
Lawyer 3
Religion:
Unitarian / Deist 3
Employment:
Employer: Presidency 4
Position: President of the United States 4
Start Date: 1797 4
End Date: 1801 4
Employment:
Position: Vice President 5
Start Date: 1789 5
End Date: 1796 5
Employment:
Employer: Court of St. James's 6
Position: American Minister (ambassador to Great Britain) 6
Place: England 6
Start Date: 1785 6
End Date: 1788 6
Employment:
Employer: Congress 7
Position: Representative (in Europe) 7
Start Date: 31 Dec 1969 7
Employment:
Employer: Board of War and Ordnance 8
Position: Head 8
Start Date: 1777 8
Employment:
Employer: Continental Congress 9
Position: Delegate 9
Place: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 9
Start Date: 1774 9
End Date: 1777 9
Education:
Institution: Harvard College 1
Place: Cambridge, Massachusetts 1
From: 1751 1
To: 1758 1

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Stories

Boston Massacre

Boston, MA

The Boston Massacre consisted of a group of soldiers being charged for firing on a crowd of civilians.  The soldiers, being very unpopular and struggling to find someone to represent them in the trial, were eventually represented by John Adams.

The work of John Adams on behalf of the soldiers resulted in the acquittal of six of the soldiers, while two who fired directly into the crowd were convicted of manslaughter (originally being charged with murder).

Declaration of Independence

John Adams was a strong supporter of the Declaration of Independence and was one who pushed for it's approval in Congress.

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