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Confederate Medals of Honor

During the War Between the States, a Confederate Medal of Honor never became reality. Disagreement as well as financial difficulties precluded it from coming to fruition. On July 1, 1896, General Stephen Dill Lee, one of the few remaining senior officers of the Confederate army, spoke to a group of sons of Confederate veterans who had gathered at Richmond to form a group to preserve the memory and valor of the Confederate soldier.

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"To you, Sons of Confederate Veterans, we submit the vindication of the cause for which we fought;

sLT. GEN STEPHEN DILL LEE.jpg

During the War Between the States, a Confederate Medal of Honor never became reality. Disagreement as well as financial difficulties precluded it from coming to fruition. On July 1, 1896, General Stephen Dill Lee, one of the few remaining senior officers of the Confederate army, spoke to a group of sons of Confederate veterans who had gathered at Richmond to form a group to preserve the memory and valor of the Confederate soldier. He told the group it was their duty to present the true history of the South to future generations. This group, chartered as the Sons of Confederate Veterans, was committed to that charge. In 1977, Private Samuel Davis of Coleman's Scouts, became the first to be posthumously presented the Confederate Medal of Honor. Since then, many others have been presented and those whose valor went far beyond the call of duty are finally being recognized.

"To you, Sons of Confederate Veterans, we submit the vindication of the cause for which we fought; to your strength will be given the defense of the Confederate soldier's good name, the guardianship of his history, the emulation of his virtues, the perpetuation of those principles he loved and which made him glorious and which you also cherish.  Remember it is your duty to see that the true history of the South is presented to future generations."

Added by bgill

ROLL OF HONOR

Colonel Leopold Ludger Armant

18th Louisiana Consolidated Regiment
April 8, 1864 ~ Mansfield, Louisiana

Sergeant Adam Washington Ballenger

13th South Carolina Infantry
July 28, 1864 ~ Deep Bottom, Virginia

Private Wilson J. Barbee

1st Texas Infantry
July 2, 1863 ~ Gettysburg, Pennsylvania

Seaman Arnold Becker

CSS H. L. Hunley
February 17, 1864 ~ Attack on USS Housatonic outside Charleston Harbor, South Carolina

Private Christopher Columbus Bland

2nd North Carolina Artillery
December 24, 1864 ~ Fort Fisher, North Carolina

Father Emmeran Bliemel

Chaplain, 10th Tennessee Infantry
August 31, 1864 - Jonesboro, Georgia

Captain Isaac Newton Brown

Commander, CSS Arkansas
July 15, 1862 ~ Yazoo and Mississippi Rivers

Colonel Henry King Burgwyn, Jr.

26th North Carolina Infantry
July 1, 1863 ~ Gettysburg, Pennsylvania

Corporal C. F. Carlsen

CSS H. L. Hunley
February 17, 1864 ~ Attack on USS Housatonic outside Charleston Harbor, South Carolina

Major General Patrick Ronayne Cleburne

Cleburne's Division
November 30, 1864 ~ Franklin, Tennessee

Seaman F. Collins

CSS H. L. Hunley
February 17, 1864 - Attack on USS Housatonic outside Charleston Harbor, South Carolina

Adjutant Claudius Virginius Hughes Davis

22nd Mississippi Infantry
July 20, 1864 ~ Peach Tree Creek, Georgia

Private Samuel Davis

Coleman's Scouts
November 27, 1863 ~ Pulaski, Tennessee

1st Lieutenant George E. Dixon

CSS H. L. Hunley
February 17, 1864 ~ Attack on USS Housatonic outside Charleston Harbor, South Carolina

David Owen Dodd

Military Telegrapher
January 8, 1864 - Little Rock, Arkansas

1st Lieutenant Richard William Dowling

1st Texas Heavy Artillery
September 8, 1863 ~ Sabine Pass, Texas

Private Lamar Fontaine

Discharged soldier
May 24-May 28, 1863 ~ Vicksburg, Mississippi

Colonel Nathan Bedford Forrest

Forrest's Cavalry
April 8, 1862 ~ Shiloh, Tennessee

Sergeant Robert Henry Gregg Gaines

23rd Alabama Infantry
May 16, 1863 ~ Bakers Creek, Mississippi

Brigadier General Richard Brooke Garnett

Garnett's Brigade
July 3, 1863 ~ Gettysburg, Pennsylvania

Lieutenant Frank Patton Gracey

Cobb's 1st Kentucky Artillery ~ On October 29, 1864 swam the Tennessee River at night; captured Union supply steamer Mazeppa and two barges in tow with large quantities of winter supplies

Brigadier General Thomas Green

Green's Texas Cavalry Corps
April 12, 1864 ~ Blair's Landing, Louisiana

Private William Guehrs

Creuzbaur's Battery, 5th Texas Artillery
May 6, 1864 ~ Calcasieu Pass, Louisiana

Brigadier General Wade Hampton

Hampton's Brigade
July 3, 1863 ~ Gettysburg, Pennsylvania

Private Asbury W. Hancock

Hampton's Brigade
July 3, 1863 ~ Gettysburg, Pennsylvania

Private Asbury W. Hancock

Hampton's Brigade
July 3, 1863 ~ Gettysburg, Pennsylvania

Private Asbury W. Hancock

19th Mississippi Infantry
May 12, 1864 ~ Spotsylvania Court House, Virginia

Lieutenant Colonel Tazewell Lee Hargrove

44th North Carolina Regiment
June 26, 1863 ~ South Anna Bridge, Virginia

Juliet Opie Hopkins

Nurse
June 1, 1862 ~ Seven Pines, Virginia

Private William A. Hughes

1st Tennessee Infantry
June 27, 1864 ~ Kennesaw Mountain, Georgia

Private Dewitt Smith Jobe

Coleman's Scouts
August 30, 1864 ~ Between Triune and Nolensville, Tennessee

2nd Lieutenant Charles H. Jones   7th South Carolina Cavalry April 8, 1865 ~ Skirmish at Manning, South Carolina   Private James Keelan Thomas' Legion
November 8, 1861 ~ Strawberry Plains, Tennessee   Sergeant Richard Rowland Kirkland 2nd South Carolina Infantry
December 14, 1862 ~ Fredericksburg, Maryland   Captain James Lile Lemon 18th Georgia Infantry
November 29, 1863 ~ Fort Sanders, Tennessee   David Herbert Llewellyn, M.D. Surgeon, CSS Alabama
June 19, 1864 ~ Off coast of Cherbourg, France, engagement with USS Kearsage Drowned June 19 1864 at Cherbourg, France
  Captain Joseph Banks Lyle   5th South Carolina Infantry October 27, 1864 ~ Battle of Williamsburg Road, Virginia   Private Tapley P. Mays 7th Virginia Infantry
May 5, 1862 ~ Williamsburg, Virginia   1st Lieutenant William Alexander McQueen Garden's Battery, Palmetto Light Artillery
July 3, 1863 ~ Gettysburg, Pennsylvania   Captain John Singleton Mosby Mosby's Regulars; 43rd Virginia Cavalry
March 8-9, 1863 - Fairfax Courthouse, Virginia   Private William Thomas Overby 43rd Virginia Cavalry
September 23, 1864 ~ Front Royal, Virginia   Private Benjamin Welch Owens 1st Maryland Artillery
June 15, 1863 ~ Stephenson's Depot, Virginia   1st Lieutenant Raphael Painpare Beauregard Artillery
April 9, 1865 ~ Battle of Dingle's Mill, South Carolina   Major John Pelham Stuart's Horse Artillery
December 13, 1862 ~ Fredericksburg, Virginia   Brigadier General William Dorsey Pender Pender's Brigade
May 3, 1863 ~ Chancellorsville, Virginia   Private James Pleasants   Company F, 4th Virginia Cavalry March 1, 1864 ~ The Dahlgren-Kilpatrick Raid, Goochland County, Virginia   Major General Camille Armand Jules Marie, Prince de Polignac Polignac's Brigade
April 8, 1864 ~ Mansfield, Louisiana   Lieutenant Charles William Read CSA Navy
June 6-June 27, 1863 ~ Cruise of the Clarence, Tacony, and Archer   1st Lieutenant William Field Rector 39th Arkansas Infantry
July 4, 1863 ~ Helena, Arkansas   Seaman Ridgeway CSS H. L. Hunley
February 17, 1864 ~ Attack on USS Housatonic outside Charleston Harbor, South Carolina   Captain Samuel Jones Ridley 1st Mississippi Artillery
May 16, 1863 ~ Bakers Creek, Mississippi   Seaman C. Simpkins CSS H. L. Hunley
February 17, 1864 ~ Attack on USS Housatonic outside Charleston Harbor, South Carolina   Seaman James A. Wicks CSS H. L. Hunley
February 17, 1864 ~ Attack on USS Housatonic outside Charleston Harbor, South Carolina   Captain Henry Wirz Ex-Commandant, Camp Sumter, Georgia
November 10, 1865 ~ Washington, D.C.   1st Lieutenant Bennett Henderson Young 5th Confederate State Retributors
October 19, 1864 ~ St. Albans, Vermont    
  • Valor in Gray: The Recipients of the Confederate Medal of Honor ~ a book by Gregg Clemmer
  • Visit The Hearthside Publishing Company ~ publisher of the above book
  • Added by bgill

    DAVID HERBERT LLEWELLYN~PHOTO

    LLEWELLYN PHOTO.gif
    David Herbert Llewellyn, M.D.Surgeon, CSS Alabama
    June 19, 1864 ~ Off coast of Cherbourg, France, engagement with USS KearsageDrowned June 19 1864 at Cherbourg, France
    Captain Joseph Banks Lyle
    Added by bgill

    The Confederate battle flag, called the "Southern Cross"

    confed flag 2.jpg

    The Confederate battle flag, called the "Southern Cross" or the cross of St. Andrew, has been described variously as a proud emblem of Southern heritage and as a shameful reminder of slavery and segregation. In the past, several Southern states flew the Confederate battle flag along with the U.S. and state flags over their statehouses. Others incorporated the controversial symbol into the design of their state flags. The Confederate battle flag has also been appropriated by the Ku Klux Klan and other racist hate groups. According to the Southern Poverty Law Center, more than 500 extremist groups use the Southern Cross as one of their symbols.

    Added by bgill

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