Summary

Conflict Period:
World War II 1
Conflict Period:
World War II 2
Branch:
Army 1
Rank:
CPL in Army Infantry 2
Birth:
1922 1
Illinois 1
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Cleatus J Connolly, KIA (1922-1944) France, Army Infantry
Cleatus J Connolly, KIA (1922-1944) France, Army Infantry
Cleatus J Connolly, KIA (1922-1944) France, Army Infantry
Cleatus J Connolly, KIA (1922-1944) France, Army Infantry
Cleatus in High School, in Springfield, Illinois.
Cleatus J Connolly
Cleatus J Connolly
L) Youngest son, Paul, Dad-Cleatus, older son Chuck and older son, Johnny. 1959
Cleatus J Connolly
Cleatus J Connolly
Cleatus Connolly, Born 1899, Father to the young Cleatus, KIA, Army Inf, Battle of St. LO, France, July 1944.
Cletus (Cleatus) J Connolly, KIA, 1944
Cletus (Cleatus) J Connolly, KIA, 1944
2006 Display made in Honor of the Sacrifice made for our Freedom, by Cleatus J Connolly
Cletus (Cleatus) J Connolly, KIA, 1944, 30th Army Inf
Cletus (Cleatus) J Connolly, KIA, 1944, 30th Army Inf
Display made in Honor of Cleatus J Connolly (1922-1944) by his youngest brother's wife, Barbi Ennis Connolly,(In 2006) for the Ultimate Scarifice made by this, our Hero.
Cleatus Father, Cleatus and brothers, Paul and Chuck
Cleatus Father, Cleatus and brothers, Paul and Chuck
Cleatus Connolly, 30th Army Infantry Division, Normandy, France
Cleatus Connolly, 30th Army Infantry Division, Normandy, France
D-Day Invasion of Normandy Beach. I do not know the exact Beach or time. Barbi
Cletus (Cleatus) J Connolly, KIA, 1944, 30th Army Inf
Cletus (Cleatus) J Connolly, KIA, 1944, 30th Army Inf
Cleatus J Connolly (Jr.) His Cross in the front row facing the Beach at Normandy.
Cleatus Connolly, 30th Army Infantry Division, Normandy, France
Cleatus Connolly, 30th Army Infantry Division, Normandy, France
Barbi is holding "Cleatus" Flag (48 Stars) given to his parents, Cleatus was my husband Paul Connolly's Brother.
Unknown Soldier, Normandy Beach, France
Unknown Soldier, Normandy Beach, France
Here Rests in Honored Glory, A Comrad in Arms, Know But to GOD.
Cletus (Cleatus) Connolly, 30th Army Infantry Division, Normandy, France
Cletus (Cleatus) Connolly, 30th Army Infantry Division, Normandy, France
Christian Crosses and Jewish Stars all together / Normandy Beach.
Cleatus J Connolly, KIA (1922-1944) France, 30th Army Infantry
Cleatus J Connolly, KIA (1922-1944) France, 30th Army Infantry
UTAH, OMAHA, GOLD, JUNO, SWORD Beach Heads, Normandy Beach Advance. D-Day, France.
Cletus (Cleatus) J Connolly, KIA, 1944, 30th Army Inf /NORMANDY Beach.
Cletus (Cleatus) J Connolly, KIA, 1944, 30th Army Inf /NORMANDY Beach.
"LEGEND" for D-Day Invasion on Normandy Beaches.
Cletus (Cleatus) J Connolly, KIA, 1944, 30th Army Inf /NORMANDY Beach.
Cletus (Cleatus) J Connolly, KIA, 1944, 30th Army Inf /NORMANDY Beach.
The "American Battle Monuments Cemetery" at Normandy Beach, France. Cleatus Connolly lies peacefully in the 1st row facing Normandy Beach. This is the "Wall of Memories" with the names of the 'missing' inscribed on it.
Cletus (Cleatus) J Connolly, KIA, 1944, 30th Army Inf /NORMANDY Beach.
Cletus (Cleatus) J Connolly, KIA, 1944, 30th Army Inf /NORMANDY Beach.
The Altar. "I give unto them eternal life and they shall never perish". Normandy "American Battle Monument Cemetery".
1st US Cemetery St Laurent-ser-Mer, near Omaha 28May'45 Photo P Carroll.jpg
1st US Cemetery St Laurent-ser-Mer, near Omaha 28May'45 Photo P Carroll.jpg
1st US Cemetery St Laurent-ser-Mer, near Omaha 28 May'45 Photo by P Carrol.
Cletus (Cleatus) J Connolly, KIA, 1944, 30th Army Inf /NORMANDY Beach.
Cletus (Cleatus) J Connolly, KIA, 1944, 30th Army Inf /NORMANDY Beach.
9387 Brave American Soldiers from all Services are buried in the "Normandy" American Battle Monuments Cemetery. Cleatus lies in the very 1st row, facing the Beach.
Cleatus J Connolly, KIA (1922-1944) France, 30th Army Infantry
Cleatus J Connolly, KIA (1922-1944) France, 30th Army Infantry
The Path Looking Down onto Normandy Beach.
Pfc Cleatus Connolly, 30th Army Infantry Division
Pfc Cleatus Connolly, 30th Army Infantry Division
Infantry arrived D-Day plus 5 (or 6) 11 June, 1944, Landing on OMAHA Beach, and advanced up to the Ridge to St LO.
Pfc Cleatus Connolly, 30th Army Infantry Division
Pfc Cleatus Connolly, 30th Army Infantry Division
Army Map of St Lo July 15-20, '44.jpg
Army Map of St Lo July 15-20, '44.jpg
30th Infantry landing on the Beaches of France, 1944
30th Infantry landing on the Beaches of France, 1944
Page 88
Page 88
Cleatus is listed in the Illinois list of War-Dead.

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Personal Details

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Also known as:
WWII KIA Infantry 2
Person:
Cletus J Connolly 1
Level of Education: 3 years of high school 1
Marital Status: Single, without dependents 1
Birth:
1922 1
Illinois 1
Residence:
Place: Sangamon County, Illinois 1
Edit

World War II 1

World War II 2

Branch:
Army 1
Rank:
CPL in Army Infantry 2
Service End Date:
16 Jul 2014 2
Enlistment Date:
23 Oct 1942 1
Army Branch:
Branch Immaterial - Warrant Officers, USA 1
Army Component:
Selectees (Enlisted Men) 1
Army Serial Number:
36433009 1
Enlistment Place:
Peoria Illinois 1
Enlistment Term:
Enlistment for the duration of the War or other emergency, plus six months, subject to the discretion of the President or otherwise according to law 1
Source of Army Personnel:
Civil Life 1
Edit
Quote:
Battle of St.LO 2
Occupation:
Semiskilled occupations in fabrication of metal products, n.e.c. 1
Race or Ethnicity:
White 1
Source Information:
Box Number: 1081 1
Film Reel Number: 5.143 1

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US ARMY Infantry; Cleatus J Connolly, KIA 16 July 1944, France

Normandy Beach, France

Cleatus Father, Cleatus and brothers, Paul and Chuck
3 images

Cleatus J Connolly, Jr.  (Spelled "Cletus" in NARA/Official Records) was born to Cleatus and Lela Mae (Fortner) Connolly in 1922, in Springfield, Ill. 

Cleatus joined the ARMY on 23 Oct. 1942 from Peoria, Illinois as a Private.  He had completed 3 years of high-school (residing in Sagamon County, Ill.) and was employed at facrication of metal products and was single at enlistment.  (36433009)  AUS # 36433009

  Cleatus arrived on Normandy Beach D-Day plus 6 and died in the battle of St LO on 16 July, 1944.

The 30th Infantry Division was made up of the existing National Guard units from the States of North and South Carolina, Georgia and Tennessee at the beginning of WWII. During WWII, The 30th Infantry Division served in Europe with distinction, and was designated as the #1 Infantry Division in the European Theater by Gen. Eisenhower's Chief Historian, Col. S.L.A. Marshall.     *****    

Although the 30th Infantry Division was not involved in the actual invasion of Normandy, the 30th served valiantly at St. LO and at Mortain in France; it was the first infantry division to enter Belgium and The Netherlands. The 30th was also instrumental in breaching the Siegfried Line in October 1944, and the capture of Aachen, Germany, the 1st large German city to be captured by the Allies in WWII.

The Battle of St. Lo

The 30th Infantry Division was not involved in the initial onslaught of D-Day as were the 1st, 29th & 4th Infantry Divisions and the 2nd and 5th Ranger Battalions, but as time went on, the 30th received their full share of unexpected wartime disasters.

The 30th Division was committed to its baptism of fire on 15 June 1944, in a sector previously occupied by the 501st Parachute Infantry Regiment of the 101st Airborne Division, with its first headquarters being established at a point just one mile south of Isigny, after leaving Omaha Beach.

A few small communities were liberated, the Vire et Taute Canal crossed, and the first town, St. Jean-de-Daye, was liberated on 7 July. The Battle for St. LO had begun seriously on 3 July, continuing on for the next few days with fierce hedgerow fighting. In preparation for this great decisive battle, the 30th Infantry Division was assigned the formidable task of taking the high ground, a ridge, just to the west of St. LO.

This section quoted from "Tommy Alfano" who most likely attended to Cleatus who his Mother Lela ,was told lived over a day.  (see web-site at LEFT)

**********  Finally we got to fall back to an area where they gave us medics more medical and combat training. It was also a place were replacements were grouped for assignments. After St. Lo the 30th Infantry moved up. Bombers were called in to saturate the area with bombs to give the 30th an easier time. However, the bombs fell short directly on the 30th Infantry Division. Many soldiers, including one of the commanders, were killed. The second wave of bombers did the same thing. The 30th weren't in any condition to attack. A reserve regiment of the 30th came in and completed the attack to finally break through the German lines. Germans countered but got stopped by Patton and his tanks. From St. Lo to Vire we lost many men including medics.
********************************************************************* Tommy Alfano**********

This was accomplished by 20 July, and thus denied the Germans of their prime observation positions overlooking St. LO, which had been the major deterrent for the 29th Division to enter and liberate the City of St. LO.

*****************************************************************

Although the 30th Infantry Division was not involved in the actual invasion of Normandy, the 30th served valiantly at St. LO and at Mortain in France; it was the first infantry division to enter Belgium and The Netherlands. The 30th was also instrumental in breaching the Siegfried Line in October 1944, and the capture of Aachen, Germany, the 1st large German city to be captured by the Allies in WWII.
(Barbi Ennis Connolly, Paul's wife.  Paul is Cleatus youngest brother)

PFC Cleatus Connolly, Army Infantry, 30th Inf. Division, Battle of St LO

St. LO, France

Pfc Cleatus Connolly, 30th Army Infantry Division
3 images

D-Day, Normandy was 6 June, 1944  117th Regiment 119th Regiment 120th Regiment

Combat Chronicle

Pvt. Paul Oglesby, 30th Infantry, standing in reverence before an altar in a damaged Catholic Church

The 30th Infantry Division arrived in England, 22 February 1944, and trained until June. It landed at Omaha Beach, Normandy, 11 June 1944, secured the Vire-et-Taute Canal, crossed the Vire River, 7 July, and, beginning on 25 July spearheaded the St. Lo break-through. The day after the division relieved the 1st Infantry Division near Mortain on 6 August, the German drive to Avranches began. Fighting in place with all available personnel, the 30th frustrated enemy plans and broke the enemy spearhead (Operation Luttich)  in a week of violent struggle, 7-12 August. The division drove east through Belgium, crossing the Meuse River at Vise and Liège, 10 September. Elements entered the Netherlands on the 12th, and Maastricht fell the next day. Taking up positions along the Wurm River, the 30th launched its attack on the Siegfried Line, 2 October 1944, and succeeded in contacting the 1st Division, 16 October, and encircling Aachen.

After a rest period, the division eliminated an enemy salient northeast of Aachen, 16 November, pushed to the Inde River at Altdorf, 28 November, then moved to rest areas. On 17 December the division rushed south to the Malmedy-Stavelot area to help block the powerful enemy drive in the Battle of the Ardennes. It launched a counteroffensive on 13 January 1945 and reached a point 2 miles south of St. Vith, 26 January, before leaving the Battle of the Bulge and moving to an assembly area near Lierneux, 27 January, and to another near Aachen to prepare for the Roer offensive. The Roer River was crossed, 23 February 1945, near Julich.

The 30th moved back for training and rehabilitation, 3 March, and on 24 March made its assault crossing of the Rhine. It pursued the enemy across Germany, mopping up enemy pockets of resistance, took Hamelin, 7 April, Braunschweig on the 12th, and helped reduce Magdeburg on the 17th. The Russians were contacted at Grunewald on the Elbe River. After a short occupation period, the 30th began moving for home, arriving 19 August 1945.

  • Assignments in the ETO
    • 18 February 1944: XIX Corps, First Army.
    • 15 July 1944: VII Corps
    • 28 July 1944: XIX Corps
    • 1 August 1944: XIX Corps, First Army, 12th Army Group
    • 4 August 1944: V Corps
    • 5 August 1944: VII Corps
    • 13 August 1944: XIX Corps
    • 26 August 1944: XV Corps, Third Army, 12th Army Group, but attached to First Army
    • 29 August 1944: XIX Corps, First Army, 12th Army Group
    • 22 October 1944: Ninth Army, 12th Army Group
    • 17 December 1944: Ninth Army, 12th Army Group, but attached to V Corps, First Army, 12th Army Group

    The 30th Infantry Division was a unit of the Army National Guard in World War I and Worl War II. It was nicknamed the "Old Hickory" division, in honor of President Andrew Jackson.

  • Thank You for your tribute and the information you provided. My Grandfather was in the 30th Div, 119th Reg, Co E and was critically wounded during the Roer River crossing near Hambach. He never spoke of what had happened and I'm now trying to piece together his experience. Your help was invaluable and I am so sorry for you loss. Thank You Troy

    Cletus (Cleatus) J Connolly, Jr.

    France

    ACTIVITY DURING WWII
    HE JOINED THE U.S. ARMY ON 23 OCTOBER 1942 FROM PEORIA, ILLINOIS AS A PRIVATE. HE LANDED ON NORMANDY BEACH D-DAY PLUS 6 IN JUNE 1944. HE SERVED WITH THE 30TH INFANTRY DIVISION WHICH WAS MADE UP OF THE EXISTING NATIONAL GUARD UNITS FROM THE STATES OF NORTH AND SOUTH CAROLINA, GEORGIA AND TENNESSEE AT THE BEGINNING OF WWII. THE 30TH INFANTRY DIVISION WAS NOT INVOLVED IN THE INITIAL ONSLAUGHT OF D-DAY BUT SERVED IN EUROPE WITH DISTINCTION AND WAS COMMITTED TO ITS BAPTISM OF FIRE ON 15 JUNE 1944, IN A SECTOR PREVIOUSLY OCCUPIED BY THE 501ST PARACHUTE INFANTRY REGIMENT OF THE 101ST AIRBORNE DIVISION. THE 30TH SERVED VALIANTLY AT ST. LO AND AT MORTAIN IN FRANCE; IT WAS THE FIRST INFANTRY DIVISION TO ENTER BELGIUM AND THE NETHERLANDS. THE 30TH WAS ALSO INSTRUMENTAL IN BREACHING THE SIEGFRIED LINE AND THE CAPTURE OF AACHEN, GERMANY, THE 1ST LARGE GERMAN CITY TO BE CAPTURED BY THE ALLIES IN WWII. A FEW SMALL COMMUNITIES WERE LIBERATED, THE VIRE ET TAUTE CANAL CROSSED, AND THE FIRST TOWN, ST. JEAN-DE-DAYE, WAS LIBERATED ON 7 JULY. THE BATTLE FOR ST. LO HAD BEGUN SERIOUSLY ON 3 JULY, CONTINUING ON FOR THE NEXT FEW DAYS WITH FIERCE HEDGEROW FIGHTING. THE 30TH INFANTRY DIVISION WAS ASSIGNED THE FORMIDABLE TASK OF TAKING THE HIGH GROUND, A RIDGE, JUST TO THE WEST OF ST. LO. HE DIED IN THE BATTLE OF ST LO ON 16 JULY, 1944.
    PFC Cletus J. Connolly ID: 36433009
    Branch of Service: U.S. Army
    Hometown: Sangamon County, IL
    Status: KIA

    Cletus J. Connolly

      ID: 36433009
    Entered the Service From: Illinois
    Rank: Private First Class

    Service: U.S. Army, 120th Infantry Regiment, 30th Infantry Division

    Died: Sunday, July 16, 1944
    Buried at: Normandy American Cemetery
    Location: Colleville-sur-Mer, France
    Plot: H Row: 12 Grave: 36

    Awards: Purple Heart

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