Summary

Conflict Period:
World War II 1
Branch:
Army 1
Birth:
20 Oct 1918 2
Clyde Park, Montana 2
Death:
25 Jun 2007 2
Mansfield, Richland Co. OHIO 2
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Personal Details

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Full Name:
Quentin Marshall Squire 2
Also known as:
Quentin M. Squire 2
Person:
Quentin M Squire 1
Level of Education: 4 years of high school 1
Marital Status: Married 1
Birth:
20 Oct 1918 2
Clyde Park, Montana 2
Male 2
Birth:
1918 1
Montana 1
Death:
25 Jun 2007 2
Mansfield, Richland Co. OHIO 2
Burial:
Burial Date: 28 Jun 2007 2
Burial Place: Mansfield Memorial Park, Mansfield, Richland Co. OHIO 2
Residence:
Place: Huron County, Ohio 1
Edit
Birth:
Mother: Anna D. Hedges Squire 2
Father: Willis B. Squire 2
Marriage:
Betty Marilyn Briggs 2
24 Feb 1946 2
OHIO 2
Edit

World War II 1

Branch:
Army 1
Enlistment Date:
02 Sep 1942 1
Army Branch:
Branch Immaterial - Warrant Officers, USA 1
Army Component:
Selectees (Enlisted Men) 1
Army Serial Number:
35338904 1
Enlistment Place:
Toledo Ohio 1
Enlistment Term:
Enlistment for the duration of the War or other emergency, plus six months, subject to the discretion of the President or otherwise according to law 1
Source of Army Personnel:
Civil Life 1
Edit
Occupation:
Flooring; Expert Tile and Carpeting Installer 2
Religion:
Presbyterian 2
Occupation:
Unskilled construction occupations, n.e.c. 1
Race or Ethnicity:
White 1
Source Information:
Box Number: 0926 1
Film Reel Number: 3.348 1

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Quentin M. Squire~BIO

OHIO

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Quentin Marshall Squire was born in Clyde Park, Montana, on October 20, 1918, the son of Willis Brooks and Anna D. (Hedges) Squire.  The family moved to Ohio in 1923, and settled in the small farming community of North Fairfield, in Huron County.  Quentin graduated from North Fairfield High School in 1937, and completed one year of college, before finding employment.  He was learning as he worked in the floor covering business.  There are skills and techniques that are used to install carpeting, linoleum, and tile, and Quentin was a quick study, and took great pride in his work.  His customers were more than satisfied with his work, they were pleased with the results he produced.

With the advent of World War II, Quentin answered the call to duty and Enlisted in the U.S. Army on 02 September 1942, at Toledo, Ohio.  Trained for combat, Quentin was assigned to the Ninth Infantry Division, and served in the Mediterranean Theater of Operations (MTO), from Algeria, Morroco, and Tunisia in North Africa, where he was decorated with the Purple Heart, to Sicily. His Division then saw action in the European Theater of Operations (ETO), at Normandy.  Quentin was promoted from Private, to Private First Class (PFC), and then earned the rank of Corporal (Cpl).


In July of 1944, after the successful accomplishments of the Allied D-Day Invasion and subsequent Allied control of Normandy, Cpl. Quentin M. Squire, was awarded the Combat Infantryman Badge, an award which provided special recognition of the unique role of the Army infantryman, the only soldier whose daily mission was to stop and destroy the enemy and to seize and hold terrain.

Quentin's Division then participated in the Campaigns of Northern France, Rhineland, the Battle of the Bulge at Ardennes-Alsace, and Following the Battle of the Bulge, the Allies pushed through to the Rhine River. On 22 March 1945 they began their assault across the river, and by 01 April 1945, the Ruhr was encircled.  Armored columns raced across Germany and into Austria and Czechoslovakia. On 25 April, the day American and Russian forces met on the Elbe, strategic bombing operations came to an end. Germany surrendered on 07 May 1945, and operations officially came to an end the following day, although sporadic actions continued on the European front until 11 May 1945.

Following the war, Quentin returned to work at Mansfield Rug & Linoleum. On 21 February 1946, Quentin Marshall Squire and Miss Betty Marilyn Briggs were married. Quentin had not lost his skill at flooring and his meticulous nature made him successful in the industry for more than 50 years, culminating in the ownership and operation of Squire Floor Covering, his own business on Fourth Street.  And while his work was important to him, his Family and his Church were the Joys of his life.  Quentin was a beloved Husband, Father, and Grandfather, and an active member of Linden Road Presbyterian Church, where he served the congregation as elder, and served on the property committee.  A committed Christian, Quentin lived his faith: always being available for friends in need, yet focusing on his family.

In June 1994, the French Government awarded The Jubilee of Liberty Medal, to pay tribute to American servicemen for their participation in the Battle of Normandy, and Quentin was one of the recipients.  It marked the the 50th Anniversary of the Invasion, from D-Day, June 6, 1944 to Aug 31, 1944, and the Restoration of France's Freedom.

On Monday morning, June 25, 2007, Quentin M. Squire, left this earth, and went home to be with the Lord.

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World War II Army Enlistment Records, 1938 - 1946
ARMY SERIAL NUMBER 35338904  35338904  
NAME SQUIRE#QUENTIN#M########SQUIRE#QUENTIN#M########  
RESIDENCE: STATE 53  OHIO  
RESIDENCE: COUNTY 077  HURON  
PLACE OF ENLISTMENT 5384  TOLEDO OHIO  
DATE OF ENLISTMENT DAY 02  02  
DATE OF ENLISTMENT MONTH 09  09  
DATE OF ENLISTMENT YEAR 42  42  
GRADE: ALPHA DESIGNATION PVT#  Private  
GRADE: CODE 8  Private  
BRANCH: ALPHA DESIGNATION BI#  Branch Immaterial - Warrant Officers, USA  
BRANCH: CODE 00  Branch Immaterial - Warrant Officers, USA  
FIELD USE AS DESIRED #  #  
TERM OF ENLISTMENT 5  Enlistment for the duration of the War or other emergency,
plus six months, subject to the discretion of the President or otherwise according to law  
LONGEVITY ###  ###  
SOURCE OF ARMY PERSONNEL 0  Civil Life  
NATIVITY 93  MONTANA  
YEAR OF BIRTH 18  18  
RACE AND CITIZENSHIP 1  White, citizen  
EDUCATION 5  1 year of college  
CIVILIAN OCCUPATION 759  Semiskilled occupations in trades and services, n.e.c.  
MARITAL STATUS 6  Single, without dependents  
COMPONENT OF THE ARMY 7  Selectees (Enlisted Men)  
CARD NUMBER #  #  
BOX NUMBER 0926  0926  
FILM REEL NUMBER 3.348  3.348 

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Ninth Infantry Division
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9th Infantry Division, U.S. Army Divisions of World War II
Name: 9th; Type: Infantry; Nickname: The Varsity
Source: Regular Army; Theater: Mediterranean & European
Casualties: 23,277; Days of Combat: 304
Activation Date: 01 Aug 40
Date Sent Overseas: 8 Nov 42 (North Africa)
Date Entered Combat: 8 Nov 42 (North Africa)
Status June 1946: active Germany
Other Wars: Vietnam
Commanding General(s): Maj. Gen. Jacob L. Devers    (Oct 40 - Jul 41)
Maj. Gen. Rene E. DeR. Hoyle    (Aug 41 - Jul 42)
Maj. Gen. Manton S. Eddy    (Aug 42 - Aug 44)
Maj. Gen. Louis A. Craig    (Aug 44 - May 45)
Brig. Gen. Jesse A. Ladd    (May 45 - Feb 46)

Campaign(s):
Algeria-French Morocco  (8 Nov 42 - 11 Nov 42) in the Mediterranean Theater
Three days after their victory at El Alamein the Allies opened a new front with an assault on Algeria and French Morocco. Twelfth Air Force, with some units based on Gibraltar, some aboard the invasion fleet, and some bearing paratroops from England, entered combat at this time. The campaign was brief, for the French in Algeria and French Morocco offered little resistance to the invaders.

Tunisia    (17 Nov 42 - 13 May 43) in the Mediterranean Theater
Having gained Algeria, the Allies quickly turned eastward, hoping to take Tunis and Bizerte before the Germans could send reinforcements into Tunisia. But the drive broke down short of the goal. In February 1943, after Rommel had been driven into Tunisia, the Axis took the offensive and pushed through Kasserine Pass before being stopped. With Ninth and Twelfth Air Forces in the battle, the Allies drove the enemy back into a pocket around Bizerte and Tunis, where Axis forces surrendered in May. Thus Tunisia became available for launching an attack on Sicily as a preliminary to an assault on Italy.

Sicily    (9 Jul - 17 Aug 43) in the Mediterranean Theater
In preparation for the invasion of Sicily the Allies captured the islands in the Sicilian strait, with aerial bombardment forcing the capitulation of Pantelleria on 11 June 1943. By that time Allied air power had begun the attack on Sicily by bombing defenses and airfields. The invasion itself got under way on the night of 9/10 July with airborne landings that were followed the next day by an amphibious assault. The enemy offered strong resistance, but the Allies had superiority in the air and soon had planes operating from Sicilian bases to support Montgomery’s Eighth Army and Patton’s Seventh. Interdictory operations against communications in Italy and between Italy and Sicily convinced the enemy that it would be impossible to move strong reinforcements. By 17 August 1943 the Allies were in possession of the island, but they had not been able to prevent a German evacuation across the Strait of Messina.

Normandy    (6 Jun 44 - 24 Jul 44) in the European Theater
Early on D-Day airborne troops landed in France to gain control of strategic areas. Aerial and naval bombardment followed. Then the invasion fleet, covered by an umbrella of aircraft, discharged Eisenhower’s assault forces. Soon the beachhead was secure, but its expansion was a slow and difficult process in the face of strong opposition. It was not until late in July that the Allies were able to break out of Normandy.

Northern France    (25 Jul 44 - 14 Sep 44) in the European Theater
Bombardment along a five-mile stretch of the German line enabled the Allies to break through on 25 July. While some armored forces drove southward into Brittany, others fanned out to the east and, overcoming a desperate counterattack, executed a pincers movement that trapped many Germans in a pocket at Falaise. The enemy fell back on the Siegfried Line, and by mid-September 1944 nearly all of France had been liberated. During these operations in France, while light and medium bombers and fighter-bomber aircraft of Ninth Air Force had been engaged in close support and interdictory operations, Eighth and Fifteenth Air Forces had continued their strategic bombing.

Rhineland    (15 Sep 44 - 21 Mar 45) in the European Theater
Attempting to outflank the Siegfried Line, the Allies tried an airborne attack on Holland on 17 September 1944. But the operation failed, and the enemy was able to strengthen his defensive line from Holland to Switzerland. Little progress was made on the ground, but the aerial attacks on strategic targets continued. Then, having regained the initiative after defeating a German offensive in the Ardennes in December 1944, the Allies drove through to the Rhine, establishing a bridgehead across the river at Remagen.

Ardennes-Alsace    (16 Dec 44 - 25 Jan 45) in the European Theater
During their offensive in the Ardennes the Germans drove into Belgium and Luxembourg, creating a great bulge in the line. For some time the weather was bad, but when it cleared the Allies could send their planes to assist their ground forces by bombing and strafing the enemy’s columns, dropping paratroops and supplies, and interdicting the enemy’s lines of communications. By the end of January 1945 the lost ground had been regained and the Battle of the Bulge, the last great German offensive, was over.

Central Europe    (22 Mar 45 - 11 May 45) in the European Theater
Following the Battle of the Bulge the Allies had pushed through to the Rhine. On 22 March 1945 they began their assault across the river, and by I April the Ruhr was encircled. Armored columns raced across Germany and into Austria and Czechoslovakia. On 25 April, the day American and Russian forces met on the Elbe, strategic bombing operations came to an end. Germany surrendered on 7 May 1945 and operations officially came to an end the following day, although sporadic actions continued on the European front until 11 May.

Notes:
Activation date is the date the division was activated or inducted into federal service (national guard units).
Casualties are number of killed, wounded in action, captured, and missing.
Other Wars are the wars in which the division was mobilized.
The dates after the campaign name are the dates of the campaign not of the division.
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The design chosen for the Ninth Division patch consists of a red quatrefoil atop a blue quatrefoil, with a white center.
The red stands for the artillery, the blue stands for the infantry and the white denotes the color of numerals found on division flags. Surrounding the Octofoil is a rim of Olive drab - Symbolic for the  for the US Army.

But in foiling there are eight foils (positions) and heraldic rules gave the Octofoil to the ninth son, since it was symbolic for his being surrounded by eight brothers. This is the explanation of why this eight petaled insignia is correct for the Ninth Regular Army Division.
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Combat Infantry Badge Information

The Combat Infantryman Badge (CIB) was established by the War Department on 27 October 1943. Lieutenant General Lesley J. McNair, then the Army Ground Forces commanding general, was instrumental in its creation. He originally recommended that it be called the "fighter badge." The CIB was designed to enhance morale and the prestige of the "Queen of Battle." Then Secretary of War Henry Stinson said, "It is high time we recognize in a personal way the skill and heroism of the American infantry."

I. DESCRIPTION
A silver and enamel badge 1 inch in height and 3 inches in width, consisting of an infantry musket on a light blue bar with a silver border, on and over an elliptical oak wreath. Stars are added at the top of the wreath to indicate subsequent awards; one star for the second award, two stars for the third award and three stars for the fourth award.

II. SYMBOLISM
The bar is blue, the color associated with the Infantry branch. The musket is adapted from the Infantry insignia of branch and represents the first official U.S. shoulder arm, the 1795 model Springfield Arsenal musket. It was adopted as the official Infantry branch insignia in 1924. The oak symbolizes steadfastness, strength and loyalty.

III. AWARD ELIGIBILITY
Awarded to personnel in the grade of Colonel or below with an infantry or special forces military occupational specialty who have satisfactorily performed duty while assigned as a member of an infantry/special forces unit, brigade or smaller size, during any period subsequent to 6 December 1941 when the unit was engaged in active ground combat.

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The Purple Heart is awarded to members of the armed forces of the U.S. who are wounded by an instrument of war in the hands of the enemy and posthumously to the next of kin in the name of those who are killed in action or die of wounds received in action. It is specifically a combat decoration.

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Quentin M. Squire
October 20, 1918 ~ June 25, 2007
From:  Mansfield, Ohio
Visitation:  Wednesday, June 27, 2007 from 5:00-8:00 P.M.
at Snyder Funeral Home, Lexington Avenue Chapel, Mansfield, OH
Funeral:  Thursday, June 28, 2007 at 11:00 A.M.
at Linden Road Presbyterian Church
Burial:  Mansfield Memorial Park, Mansfield, Ohio
 
MANSFIELD: Quentin M. Squire, 88, of Dawson Avenue, Mansfield, died Monday morning June 25, 2007 in Triumph Hospital of Mansfield following a short illness.  No longer at home on this earth, Quentin is at home with the Lord.

He was born October 20, 1918 in Clyde Park, MT, to Willis B. and Anna D. (Hedges) Squire, and came to Ohio at age five. He was graduated from North Fairfield High School in 1937.  A US Army veteran of WWII, Quentin served in the European Theater, from North Africa, where he was decorated with the Purple Heart, to Sicily. His action at Normandy, Northern France and the Rhineland Campaign in liberating France earned him the Jubilee of Liberty medal from the French Government. He was member of V.F.W. Post #7651, Ontario, (Richland Co.) OHIO.

Following the war he returned to work at Mansfield Rug & Linoleum. His skill at flooring and meticulous nature made him successful for 50 years ~ culminating in the ownership and operation of Squire Floor Covering, his own business on Fourth Street.

He was an active member of Linden Road Presbyterian Church, served the congregation as elder, and served on the property committee.  A committed Christian, Quentin lived his faith: always being available for friends in need, yet focusing on his family.

He is survived by his wife Betty M. (Briggs) Squire, whom he married February 24, 1946; a daughter Linét Adkins of Mansfield; grandchildren Christopher & Nicole Adkins of Mansfield, Heather & Peter Hernandez of Phoenix, AZ, Hollie and Steve Goines of Perrysville, and Andrew Adkins of Columbus; great grandchildren Halie, Morgan, Brooklynn, Dana, Aleecia, Peter, Delana and Jonathon; sisters-in-law Zanette Fackler of Plymouth, Margaret and her husband Harold Myers of Mansfield, and Eda Briggs of Plymouth; numerous nieces and nephews including Terry Squire of Richfield; and his church family.  A brother Lowell Squire preceded him in death.

The family will receive friends Wednesday, June 27, 2007 from 5-8 PM in the Lexington Avenue Snyder Funeral Home. Visiting continues Thursday from 10-11 AM in Linden Road Presbyterian Church, 160 South Linden Road, Mansfield where the worship service, giving glory to God and thanksgiving for the life of Quentin Squire will follow at 11 AM. The Rev. Jim Smith will officiate. Burial will follow in Mansfield Memorial Park, where the Richland County Joint Veterans Burial Detail will hold graveside military honors.

Memorial contributions to Linden Road Presbyterian Church, or Triumph Hospital may be made at the funeral home.
Online condolences may be made to the family by visiting: www.snyderfuneralhomes.com
--
Social Security Death Index
Name: Quentin Marshall Squire
SSN: 268-14-5559
Last Residence: 44906  Mansfield, Richland, Ohio, United States of America
Born: 20 Oct 1918
Died: 25 Jun 2007

State (Year) SSN issued: Ohio (Before 1951)
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Ohio Deaths, 1908-1932, 1938-1944, and 1958-2007
Name: Quentin M Squire
Birth Date: 20 Oct 1918
Birth State: Montana
Birth Country: United States
Gender: Male
Race: White
Residence County: Clermont
Residence state: Ohio
Residence Zip Code: 44906-3201
Residence Country: United States
Death Date: 25 Jun 2007
Death Time: 09:07 AM
Certificate: 054934
Age at Death: 88
Registrar's Certificate Number: 053426
Certifier: Physician
Method of Disposition: Burial
Hospital Status: Inpatient
Social Security Number: 268-14-5559
Father's Surname: Squire
Marital Status: Married
Education: High School Graduate or GED Completed
Industry of Decedent: Floor Covering
Occupation of Decedent: Salesman
Census Tract: 39139001300

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U.S. Department of Veteran Affairs
Nationwide Gravesite Locator
 SQUIRE, QUENTIN M    
 CPL   US ARMY  
 WORLD WAR II  
 DATE OF BIRTH: 10/20/1918  
 DATE OF DEATH: 06/25/2007  
 BURIED AT:  MANSFIELD MEMORIAL PARK  
 2507 PARK AVENUE WEST MANSFIELD, OH 44906  
 (419) 529-4433 

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21 April 1930 Census/Fairfield/Huron Co./Ohio/Roll: 1823/ED-3/Page: 5
Household Members: Name     Age Family#: 111-111
Willis B Squire/Head of Household/66/1st married at 21/OHx3/Farmer/Farm
Anna D Squire/Wife/54/1st married at 35/IND/KY/IND
Quentin M Squire/Son/11/Montana/OH/IND
Jane V Hedges/Mother-in-Law/75/Widowed/1st married at 20/IND/France/IND

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