Summary

Conflict Period:
World War II 1
Branch:
Army 1
Birth:
1920 1
Ohio 1
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Personal Details

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Person:
Jack F Chappell 1
Level of Education: 4 years of high school 1
Marital Status: Single, without dependents 1
Birth:
1920 1
Ohio 1
Residence:
Place: Cuyahoga County, Ohio 1
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World War II 1

Branch:
Army 1
Enlistment Date:
14 Feb 1942 1
Army Branch:
Branch Immaterial - Warrant Officers, USA 1
Army Component:
Selectees (Enlisted Men) 1
Army Serial Number:
35266725 1
Enlistment Place:
Ft Thomas Newport Kentucky 1
Enlistment Term:
Enlistment for the duration of the War or other emergency, plus six months, subject to the discretion of the President or otherwise according to law 1
Source of Army Personnel:
Civil Life 1
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Occupation:
321stBG,446thBS, B-25 2
Occupation:
Photoengravers 1
Race or Ethnicity:
White 1
Source Information:
Box Number: 0915 1
Film Reel Number: 3.337 1

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Stories

Jack Chappell 321st BG, 446th BS, B-25's Combat, N Africa/Italy

Italy

Jack F Chappell, Cleveland, Ohio
4 images

T/Sgt Jack Chappell was a Combat Crew member of the B-25 Mitchell 321st Bomb Group and he was flown over with the [now famous] Knapp Flight Over, Feb. 1943. Jack was a Radio Operator/Aerial Gunner with the 446th Bomb Squad and flew all but a few of his 50 Missions out of North Africa. Finishing up the 30th August, he was released to return to the ZI on 8 Oct. 1943 from the AAC Base in Grotagglie, Italy.

**********FIRST MISSION:
 Monday, 15 March 1943
446th BS Mission Summary: (Ops Order 1/mission 1) Group Mission # 1: The Squadron’s first mission, and also the first for the Group, led by Major Schwane. 3 planes from the Squadron. Frag bombs were used on the L/G north of Mezzouna and the results were good. Heavy flak was encountered.
      A/C No. 41-13197
P: Taylor, Peter D., 1Lt
CP: Axson, Ralph L., Jr., 1Lt
N: None
B: Meehan, James M., 2Lt
E: McNair, Luddie L., S/Sgt
R: Chappell, Jack F., T/Sgt
G: Belser, Oscar L., S/Sgt
F: None ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
 

50th and last Mission;    Friday 08 October 1943;  446th BS War Diary;  T/Sgt. Chappell, Jack F., and S/Sgt. Mencher, Fred S., finish their Fiftieth Missions. There has been quite a bit of rain,but the sun always comes out, and dries everything out for which we are thankful.
    Friday, 8 October 1943;  446th BS Mission Summary: (Ops Order 134/mission 133) Group Mission # 135:  Squadron Mission 107;  TARGET: Athens Eleusis A/D, Greece. DATE: 8 Oct 1943  Type of Bombs: Fragmentation 446th Planes: 12;  MAJOR SCHWANE led the formation and the coverage of the target was excellent. Strings of bombs fell across the hangars, the field and runway, and the dispersal area. Seven direct hits were claimed on E/A. Three fires were observed in the NW part of the field. A flak battery at the NE corner of the field was reported hit.  *****************
    Two B-25’s were lost, (not 446th) one exploding on hitting the water and
one making a controlled landing on the water. One P-38 crashed into a mountain
and one went into the water. One FW190 and two ME 109’s were destroyed. One
unidentified E/A possibly was destroyed. Two ME 109’s and on unidentified
E/A were damaged. 30/40 E/A attacked very aggressively after the bomb run
and made repeated passes. The
B25 which landed on the water was strafed and exploded. 50/60 E/A were on
the field. The flak was heavy, moderate to intense, and fairly accurate.

AC/41-12963 "Missouri Waltz"
P: Chappell, Howard L., Capt
CP: Bettinger, Joward P., 2Lt.
N: Schad, Harlan C., 2Lt.
B: Robertson, Charles W., 2Lt.
E: Kaney, Oscar J., Jr., S/Sgt.
R: Chappell, Jack F., T/Sgt.
G: Skill, Donald H., Sgt.
N: None
------------------------------------
     Monday, 1 November 1943
446th BS War Diary: T/Sgt. Jack Chappell, S/Sgt. Urie P. Zook, Lt. Thomas E. Dains, Lt. Sterling Davis, Lt. Wallace Williams, Lt. Richard P. Morris, T/Sgt. W.H. Haley, S/Sgt. Billy Dykes, S/Sgt. Joe B. DeWitt, S/Sgt. L.M. Mitchell, and S/Sgt. Walter E. Porter were today transferred to the Port of
Debarkation, USA. Some of the men were getting short on their cigarettes and a ration this evening lifted their spirits.

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Social Security Death Index
Name: Jack F. Chappell
Last Residence: 92802 Anaheim, Orange, California, United States of America
Born: 14 May 1920
Died: 6 Sep 2006
State (Year) SSN issued: Ohio (Before 1951)
-----------------------
Jack Fredrick Chappell
Birth: 5/14/1920 (14 May 1920)
Death: 6 Sep 2006 - Anaheim, Orange County (Orange), California, USA
Parents
Father: Maurice Harley Chappell 1890 – 1975
Mother: Gertrude Fredricka Browniger 1889 – 1990

Brother, Howard Chappell
Sister, Virginia Chappell
Sister, Josephine Chappell

  Jack earned the AIR MEDAL with 8 Oak Leaf Clusters and has 3 enemy aircraft kills to his credit!

 

Barbara Ennis Connolly  321stBG Historian PRINCESSBARBI_B25@msn.com

Research by the 321st BG History Team, Patti Johnson, John T Fitzgerald and Barbi Ennis Connolly.

Jack Chappell, 321stBG,446thBS, B-25 Combat/MTO

North Africa

Photo's and stories coming from Jack's proud son Dr. Rick Chappell;  "About RICK"

Dr. Charles (Rick) Chappell, the director of science and research communications, received his bachelor's degree in physics from Vanderbilt University, and his Ph.D. in space science from Rice University. Prior to returning to Vanderbilt as director of the Office of Science and Research Communications, he was associate director for science at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala. There he directed research in solar terrestrial physics and served as principal investigator on several satellite missions. From May 1994 to May 1995, he worked with Vice President Al Gore to create an innovative K-12 science education program known as GLOBE (Global Learning and Observations to Benefit the Environment). He founded the Aspen Global Change Institute in 1989, together with John Denver's Windstar Foundation.

Prior to that, he served as alternate payload specialist for the space shuttle mission STS-45, which was carried out in March 1992. From 1976 to 1985, he was mission scientist for Spacelab 1, a joint European/American shuttle mission that conducted investigations in material sciences, life sciences, space physics, earth observations and astronomy. He has published more than 150 scientific papers in a variety of journals.

***************** 

321stBG, 446thBS, "Knapp Flight Over the Atlantic" Southern Route

Florida

General Bob Knapp's Flight over the Atlantic;

THE FLIGHT OVER:
Friday, 12 February 1943
HQ 321st BG War Diary: Flight Echelon Log submitted by Group Intelligence:
The 445th and 446th Squadrons were scheduled to leave DeRidder at 0915 and
0930. However; at 0830, the base called and said they had a coded message
which was from Col. Meloy of the 3rd Air Force ordering the entire group of 59
planes to proceed to Homestead Field, Fla., instead of Morrison Field, Fla.
The group got off before noon, the 445th and 446th Squadrons being only
slightly behind schedule. Homestead Field was reached without incident in about
5 hours and 15 minutes; the 445th arriving at about 0230. As soon as the
445th and 446th Squadrons landed, they were ordered to Morrison Field and left
immediately. The 447th and 448th Squadrons were instructed by the tower at
Homestead Field and proceeded to Morrison Field, without landing.

There was a slight overcast most of the way and heavier clouds near
Homestead Field. The planes went down to a few hundred feet to avoid them. Weather
was distinctly chilly.
Lieut. Rudolph, 445th Squadron, went into Lafayette, La., with engine
trouble; but reached Morrison Field the next day. The right engine of Capt.
Bates’ plane, 446th Squadron, had a leaking oil-cooler. This was repaired, but on
taking off at 2100, the right wheel locked and both tires blew out. New
wheels and tires were supplied by the 318th Ferry Squadron (from a crashed
B-25), who were very cooperative and the plane reached Morrison Field the next
afternoon. Almost all the officers and enlisted men werequartered in hotels
in West Palm Beach, Fla.

446th BS War Diary: Ground Echelon: En route to Theatre of Operations. Air
Echelon: Formation took off from DeRidder with Col. Knapp leading. Although
the destination was Morrison Field, Fla. Which was to be the Port of
Embarkation, some planes were forced to land at Homestead field, Fla. They rejoined
the others a few hours later. Minor mechanical difficulties were the
reasons for some of the planes stopping en route.

A/C No. 41-13197
P: Taylor, Peter D., 1Lt
CP: Axson, Ralph L., Jr., 2Lt
N: Meehan, James M., 2Lt (Bmb/Nav)
B: N/A
E: McNair, Luddie L., S/Sgt
R: Chappell, Jack F., T/Sgt
G: Edwards, David R., Sgt
F: Chavez, Louis (NMI), M/Sgt (PAX)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
------
Saturday, 13 February 1943
HQ 321st BG War Diary: Flight Echelon Log submitted by Group Intelligence:
The day was spent in briefing, physical examinations, handing in orders,
overhauling planes, etc.
The briefing for the trip was good, but a little more hurried than had been
expected, as the pilots and navigators felt well repaid for the previous
study they had done on the route. Weather quite chilly.

446th BS War Diary: Air Echelon: Staging Area activities.
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
---------
Sunday, 14 February 1943
HQ 321st BG War Diary: Flight Echelon Log submitted by Group Intelligence:
This day was also spent in a general polishing-up for the trip. In the
afternoon, orders were issued to leave the next morning at 0815, for Borinquen
Field, Peurto Rico.

446th BS War Diary: Air Echelon: Capt. Schwane gave instructions for the
overseas flight, beginning his talk by saying, “Is there anyone here who
doesn’t want to go to Africa?” All final arrangements were made this date.
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Monday, 15 February 1943
HQ 321st BG War Diary: Flight Echelon Log submitted by Group Intelligence:
The crews were called at 0500 for an 0815 take-off. However, the breakfast
arrangements at Morrison Field were inadequate and caused a delay, which was
also contributed to by 9 B-24s taking off ahead of us. The 445th Squadron
took off at 0915 and reached Borinquen Field at approximately 1500.
Fifty-seven planes took off.
It was cold and partly cloudy for about the first half of the trip, which
was made at 2,000 feet. About 200 miles out from Borinquen Field, a cold
front was met. Some of the squadrons went down to water level to get through it;
and the others climbed to 13,000 feet and went over it. Landfall was made
by the 446th Squadron a few miles south of Borinquen Field.
Lieut. Hess, 448th Squadron, had to remain at Morrison Field for a new
engine and Lieut. Griffith, 446th Squadron, for a new wing tank.

Enroute, Lieut. McLaughlin, 445th Squadron, had engine trouble and went
into Oakes Field, Nassau. The oil-pressure on the engine of Lieut. Richardson’s
plane failed about 20 minutes out of Borinquen Field, and he had to remain
over for a new engine. Orders were issued to take off the next morning at
0715, the 445th and 446th Squadrons, to proceed to Atkinson Field, Georgetown,
British Guinea, while the 447th and 448th Squadrons were to go to Waller
Field, Trinidad. This was to avoid overcrowding those fields. The group was
ordered to fly to Belem, the second day following.

The weather was warm and every one changed in khakis. Quinine was
distributed to all personnel. A big and well-equipped base. The B-24s that took off
ahead of us at Morrison Field, were left here.

446th BS War Diary: Ground Echelon: En route to Theatre of Operations. Air
Echelon: At 0900 hours the formation led by Capt. Schwane took off for the
first point in their overseas journey which was Puerto Rico. The formation
landed at 1500 hours. TOTAL FLYING TIME: 5½ hours.
-----------------------------------------------------
Tuesday, 16 February 1943
HQ 321st BG War Diary: Flight Echelon Log submitted by Group Intelligence:
Fifty-five planes left Borinquen Field, the 445th Squadron taking off at
0800. Arrangements for leaving were handled well by the base, the only
difficulty being the trouble crews had in finding their dispersed planes in the
darkness. The 446th Squadron took off at 0815 and reached Atkinson Field,
Georgetown, British Guinea at 1445 in six and one-half hours.
A strong wind from the east drifted the formation about 60 miles off
course, causing us to meet the coastline of Guinea earlier than we had planned.
Scattered clouds with a base at 2,000 feet. The trip was made at 1,000 feet to
sea-level. Scattered thunder-showers were met. Both squadrons arrived in
good shape. Temperature at Atkinson, about 86°.
A comfortable base with large, airy barracks. Planned to lay over tomorrow
for rest and some work on the planes.

446th BS War Diary: Ground Echelon: En route to Theatre of Operations. Air
Echelon: Took off at 0830 hours for British Guiana, South America. Landed at
1500 hours. TOTAL FLYING TIME: 12 hours.
--------------------------------------------------------------------
Wednesday, 17 February 1943
HQ 321st BG War Diary: Flight Echelon Log submitted by Group Intelligence:
Day spent at Atkinson Field working on planes. Nine B-24s, Col. Beebe
commanding, arrived from Borinquen Field.

446th BS War Diary: Ground Echelon: En route to Theatre of Operations. Air
Echelon: Took off for Belem, Brazil at 06:45 hours, but as one plane needed
engine repairs, the formation circled at Paramaribo, Surinam, then proceeded
to Belem, leaving #41-13200 at Paramaribo. The formation landed at 1040
hours. TOTAL FLYING TIME: 18 hours 8 minutes.
--------------------------------------------------------------
Thursday, 18 February 1943
HQ 321st BG War Diary: Flight Echelon Log submitted by Group Intelligence:
The 446th Squadron took off from Atkinson Field at 0630. They cruised at
1,000 feet and passed over Devil’s Island and Cayenne. At 1020, we ran into
heavy thunder-storms which lasted for over an hour. Formation climbed in a big
spiral to 10,000 feet, visibility almost zero from sea-level up. At 10,000
feet formation became separated and Captain Bates’ plane came down to 200
feet and resumed course on instruments, flying through rain and undercast.
Captain Schwane continued up to 17,000 feet but even then could not get above
clouds, and resumed course on instruments. The 445th Squadron flew through the
storm at sea-level.

Previously, Lieut. Fisher’s prop-controller went out of order and the
flight circled Paramaribo Field, Zandery, Dutch Guinea, leaving him there.

Val de Caes, Belem, Brazil was reached at 1330 B.G. time, a flight of seven
hours. The 445th Squadron took slightly over six hours. Of the 29 planes
that took off, all except Lieut. Fisher’s arrived.

446th BS War Diary: Air Echelon: Check and repair for continuation of
flight.
-------------------------------------------------------------
Friday, 19 February 1943
HQ 321st BG War Diary: Flight Echelon Log submitted by Group Intelligence:
The 445th and 446th Squadrons did not leave for Natal because of weather.

446th BS War Diary: Ground Echelon: En route to Theatre of Operations. Air
Echelon: Check and repair for continuation of flight. #41-13200, pilot
Fisher, rejoined the Squadron at Belem on Feb. 19.
--------------------------------------------------------------------
Saturday, 20 February 1943
HQ 321st BG War Diary: Flight Echelon Log submitted by Group Intelligence:
Left Belem at 0835 and arrived at Natal at 1445, six hours and ten minutes
later. Weather was cloudy to partly cloudy at the start, with cumulus and
strato-cumulus clouds with base at about 800 feet. About 1030, weather cleared,
but later ran into scattered thunder-showers. Made first half of trip at
500 feet and last half at 1,500 feet. East wind most of the way at about 20
mph, occasionally becoming a tail wind. Take-off was scheduled for 0630, but
B-24s ahead of us were late and delayed us. All 54 planes arrived.

446th BS War Diary: Ground Echelon: En route to Theatre of Operations. Air
Echelon: Took off at 0759 hours for Natal, Brazil, landing there at 1422
hours. TOTAL FLYING TIME: 24 HOURS 31 MINUTES.
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Sunday, 21 February 1943
Flight Echelon Log submitted by Group Intelligence: Feb 21, 1943 Spent at
Natal going over ships. Scheduled to take off tomorrow for Ascension Island
at 0515. So many planes that briefing was given in two sections. It was found
that a number of the planes were carrying too much ammunition, so this was
left there. Getting sandwiches is proving to be a problem. Atkinson Field
was last place with PX supplies, nothing to speak of at Belem and Natal,
including food and candies. At Atkinson field, we were supplied with one sandwich
each. At Belem, they were short of food and would give us nothing. Lieut.
McLaughlin, 445th Squadron, who landed at Nassau, was ordered to return to
Morrison Field to join the others there. Forecast for tomorrow was good, with
usual prevailing head-winds.

446th BS War Diary: Air Echelon: Check and repairs to aircraft.
---------------------------------------------------------------
Monday, 22 February 1943
HQ 321st BG War Diary: Flight Echelon Log submitted by Group Intelligence:
The 447th Squadron took off at 0610 after B-24s, then the 448th Squadron and
446th Squadron at 0635 and the 445th Squadron followed. Scattered showers
began at 0320 and there were occasional showers and a drizzle throughout
take-off time. Cumulus clouds and ceiling at about 1,400 feet. The entire trip
was made at 1,300 feet just below clouds base. Occasional rain and undercast
was met. After three hours, clouds became scattered and were strato-cumulus.
Wind was slightly south of east. Radio beacon at Ascension Island could be
picked up about 4 hours after leaving Natal. Trip was uneventful and all 54
planes arrived in good order. Sandwiches were available for only about
two-thirds of the group. Left Natal 0635. Ascension arrived at 1515, making eight
hours and forty minutes. Ascension is on Greenwich time, 3 hours ahead of
Natal. Ordered to Roberts Field tomorrow, in Liberia. The island was very
crowded with 10 men in a tent. One plane broke through surface at Natal and was
left. Lieut. Whiteford, 445th Squadron. The other 53 planes arrived safely.

446th BS War Diary: Air Echelon: Took off at 0645 hours for Ascension
Island, which was the longest phase of the flight. Arrived 1542 hours. TOTAL
FLYING TIME: 24 hours 31 minutes.
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Tuesday, 23 February 1943
HQ 321st BG War Diary: Flight Echelon Log submitted by Group Intelligence:
The B-24s took off ahead of us for Accra. The 446th Squadron took off at
0905 for Roberts Field, Liberia. Sandwiches were not available, so each person
received one Army Field Ration D. Arrived Roberts Field at 1440. The weather
was cloudy almost all the way, mostly an overcast with base at 1,200 feet.
Occasional rain was met and at times, undercast almost to sea-level. The
field was crowded, and only wing-tanks were filled.

446th BS War Diary: Air Echelon: Took off at 0900 hours for Monrovia,
Liberia, sighting land at 1410 hours, landing in Africa for the first time at
1442 hours. TOTAL FLYING TIME: 39 hours 48 minutes.
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
-
Wednesday, 24 February 1943
HQ 321st BG War Diary: Flight Echelon Log submitted by Group Intelligence:
Heavy ground-fog delayed take-off which was scheduled for 0600. Gassing of
planes was not completed during the night and will not be finished until
about 1100 today. The 446th Squadron took off at 0950 and reached Rufisque
Airfield at 1405, making four hours and fifteen minutes flying time. Weather was
cloudy all the way, and hot. Clouds varied from strato-cumulus to overcast
at about 1,500 feet or lower. Slight head-winds all the way. The 447th
Squadron’s gassing was not completed until 1300. Capt. Bell, 447th Squadron, who
was delayed at Zandery, reached Roberts Field. Lieut. Veum, 448th Squadron,
had carburetor scoop torn. The PX was well-supplied, the first one since
Atkinson Field.

446th BS War Diary: Air Echelon: Took off at 1007 hours for Dakar, French
West Africa, arriving at 1419 hours. TOTAL FLYING TIME: 43 hours.
-------------------------------------------------------------
Thursday, 25 February 1943
HQ 321st BG War Diary: Flight Echelon Log submitted by Group Intelligence:
The 446th Squadron took off for Marrakech at 0800. The 445th Squadron got
off about 0730, but gassing of the 446th Squadron was not completed until
0800. Strong winds blew all night, but there nevertheless was ground-fog in the
morning. Head-winds at the start. Flew in formation at about 7,000 feet
across the desert to Tindouf and then through a pass in the Atlas Mountains.
Arrived in Marrakech at 1505, making seven hours and five minutes flying-time.
Lieut. Veum was able to repair his plane at Dakar and came with his
squadron. Apparently, PX announcing our arrival was delayed and arrangements for us
were not complete, some officers having to sleep in hangar and planes.
Fifty-three planes arrived safely. Head-winds and clouds most of the way, and
dust-haze about 5,000 feet. Cleared before reaching mountains, with clouds at
10,000 feet over the mountains and pass. Flew under cloud-base. No order here
for next move.

446th BS War Diary: Ground Echelon: Regular garrison duties. Air Echelon:
Took off at 0820 hours for Marrakech, Morocco. Landed at 1520 hours. TOTAL
FLYING TIME: 50 hours. This was the first time an entire Squadron had flown a
single formation from the United States to North Africa, a feat which is
especially noteworthy, inasmuch as only 10 days elapsed en route.
--------------------------------------------------
Friday, 26 February 1943
HQ 321st BG War Diary: Flight Echelon Log submitted by Group Intelligence:
Lieut. Whiteford, 445th Squadron, arrived from Dakar. There are now 54
planes here. Most of the officers are quartered in town.

446th BS War Diary: Air Echelon: Check and repairs. Waiting to set up at a
Base.
----------------------------------------------------------
Saturday, 27 February 1943
HQ 321st BG War Diary: Flight Echelon Log submitted by Group Intelligence:
Friday, Marrakech.

446th BS War Diary: Air Echelon: Check and repairs. Waiting to set up at a
Base.
-------------------------------------------------------------
Sunday, 28 February 1943
HQ 321st BG War Diary: Flight Echelon Log submitted by Group Intelligence:
Marrakech, Lieut. Fineman’s plane, 447th Squadron, tail struck by B-17
taking off. Ordered to proceed to Oujda, temporarily instead of Oran.

446th BS War Diary: Air Echelon: Check and repairs. Waiting to set up at a
Base.
------------------------------------------------------------
Monday, 1 March 1943
HQ 321st BG War Diary: No Entry
446th BS War Diary: Check and repairs. Waiting to set up at a Base.
------------------------------------------------------
Tuesday, 2 March 1943
HQ 321st BG War Diary: Flight Echelon Log submitted by Group Intelligence:
Took off at 1030 for Oujda, but returned at 1150 because of clouds in the
pass. Flyingtime, one hour and twenty minutes. Lieut. Martin’s plane, 446th
Squadron, nose-wheel gave way on landing and his plane was damaged. There are
52 planes here. The 445th Squadron took off at 1340 for Oujda and the 446th
Squadron took off at 1440. We had a
short in the bomb-sight and had to return. Took off at 1540, got as far as
Meknes and returned because of clouds over the mountains. Landed at
Marrakech at 1800, for two hours and twenty minutes flying time. The 446th Squadron
also returned. Lieut. Fineman’s damaged tail was repaired from Lieut.
Martin’s plane.

446th BS War Diary: Check and repairs. Waiting to set up at a Base. Took
off at 0935 hours, landing at 1206 hours at Oujda, which was the final base
for the trip. TOTAL FLYING TIME FROM FLORIDA TO MOROCCO: 52 hours 30 minutes.
---------------------------------------------------------------

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