Summary

Conflict Period:
World War II 1
Branch:
USAAF 92nd Bomb Group 2
Branch:
Army 1
Birth:
1922 1
Florida 1
Death:
10 Jan 1944 3
Liege, Belgium 3
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Personal Details

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Person:
J L Adams 1
Also known as: Jay L Adams 2
Level of Education: Grammar school 1
Marital Status: Separated, with dependents 1
Birth:
1922 1
Florida 1
Death:
10 Jan 1944 3
Liege, Belgium 3
Cause: Bailed from damaged aircraft (too low for bailout) 3
Residence:
Place: Jackson County, Florida 1
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World War II 1

Branch:
USAAF 92nd Bomb Group 2
Branch:
Army 1
Enlistment Date:
18 May 1943 1
Army Branch:
No branch assignment 1
Army Component:
Selectees (Enlisted Men) 1
Army Serial Number:
34806532 1
Enlistment Place:
Ft McClellan Alabama 1
Enlistment Term:
Enlistment for the duration of the War or other emergency, plus six months, subject to the discretion of the President or otherwise according to law 1
Source of Army Personnel:
Civil Life 1
USAAF:
92nd Bomb Group, 325th Squadron 3
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Occupation:
Farm hands, general farms 1
Race or Ethnicity:
White 1
Source Information:
Box Number: 0851 1
Film Reel Number: 3.273 1

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Stories

During this mission suspiciously painted B-17's (no group markings) were noted as they appeared from nowhere and without radio contact to join the formation, similar attempts had been made on the missions of Jan 5th and 8th. Earlier attempts were noted in December 1943. Crew members felt certain that the aircraft were enemy manned, but their purpose remained mysterious and obscure.

Target; Gymnich Airdrome

Gymnich Airdrome, Germany

A/C No 2102396. 92nd Bomb Group, 325th Squadron, piloted by 1st Lt Robert C Hirsch  exhibited  a high degree of skill and tenacity of purpose in completeing the mission, even though at one time none of his engines was functioning.  On the first run, Flak knocked out the No. 1 engine, and on the second run, the No. 2 engine.  On this run, the lead bombardier was unable to identify the target in time and bombs were not dropped.  Lt Hirsch's aircraft began to lag behind the formation as it regrouped for the third run, but he was determined to bomb.  Maintaining air speed by dropping altitude and using the full power of his remaining two engines he was able to stay close to the formation.  Just before bombs away, Flak knocked out both of the remaining engines.

Working feverishly, with the aircraft losing considerable air speed and altitude, Lt Hirsch then displayed remarkable aeronautical ability.  He brought the No. 1 engine back into operation even though the prop was still running away.  Dropping the bomb load on an unidentified German town, he headed for friendly territory, losing altitude at about 1,000 to 1,500 feet per minute.  Spotting a field near Liege, Belgium, and behind friendly lines, Lt Hirsch ordered the crew to the radio room and prepared to crash land a badly damaged aircraft... not only were three engines out, but the bomb-bay doors were opened and jammed, and the guns in the inoperative ball turret were at a 90 degree angle.  At 300 feet, without order, S/Sgt Jay L. Adams, the waist gunner bailed out and was killed.  Lt Hirsch landed the aircraft without injury to the crew

 

Source; 92nd Archive records,

"The Route As Briefed; John Sloan

 

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