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World War II 1
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1913 1
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PFC Richard H Loring, DNB, 10 May, 1944/Courier ship/Corsica
PFC Richard H Loring, DNB, 10 May, 1944/Courier ship/Corsica
PFC Richard Holmes Loring, DNB, 10 May,'44 /Crash on Corsica /Courier Ship
PFC Richard Holmes Loring, DNB, 10 May,'44 /Crash on Corsica /Courier Ship
Richard H Loring (Age 28) with his niece, Erma Jean Cole (Lowe)
Richard H Loring (Age 28) with his niece, Erma Jean Cole (Lowe)
Richard H Loring (Age 28) with his niece, Erma Jean Cole (Lowe) ********** Richard H. Loring at age 28 with his sister, E. Jean Cole, then 17, of Carver, before he left to fight in World War II.
PFC Richard Loring, Lost in Courier Crash/Corsica/10 May, 1944
PFC Richard Loring, Lost in Courier Crash/Corsica/10 May, 1944
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Full Name:
Richard Holmes Loring 2
Person:
Richard H Loring 1
Level of Education: 4 years of high school 1
Marital Status: Single, without dependents 1
Birth:
1913 1
Massachusetts 1
Residence:
Place: NewYork County, New York 1
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World War II 1

Branch:
Army 1
Enlistment Date:
17 Mar 1942 1
Army Branch:
Branch Immaterial - Warrant Officers, USA 1
Army Component:
Selectees (Enlisted Men) 1
Army Serial Number:
32229446 1
Enlistment Place:
Cp Upton Yaphank New York 1
Enlistment Term:
Enlistment for the duration of the War or other emergency, plus six months, subject to the discretion of the President or otherwise according to law 1
Source of Army Personnel:
Civil Life 1
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Occupation:
Bakers 1
Race or Ethnicity:
White 1
Source Information:
Box Number: 0484 1
Film Reel Number: 2.148 1

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Cpl Richard H Loring, DNB, 10 May, 1944, Courier Ship Crash/Corsica

Corsica, France

Richard was born in New York in 1913, He enlisted in the service at CP UPTON YAPHANK NEW YORK on 17 March, 1942, he had completed high school and was married at Enlistment.

Richard was on the B-25 #42-53371 "Deathwind" bound for Corsica when they got caught in bad weather and the Ship off course, crashed into the Mountains on Corsica. Cpl Richard Loring was a Rear-Gunner.  His promotion had been approved, but the paperwork had not caught up with this supervisors yet.

57th Bomb Wing    
 
Wednesday, 10 May 1944

HQ 57th BW: Extracts from Missing Air Crew Report # 16458: Plane B-25 type AP was on a routine training flight, en route to Ghisonaccia, Corsica, on 10 May 1944 when it crashed into a mountain near Sartene, Corsica. A/C No. 42-53371 “Death Wind” (MACR-16458 - crashed into mountain) (formerly 447th BS ship) P Geerlings, Lewis J., Capt, HQ 57th BW - KNB CP Fletcher, Ray F., 1Lt, HQ 57th BW - KNB PAX Elliott, Edwin (NMI), S/Sgt, HQ 57th BW - KNB PAX Chapin, Carolyn, American Red Cross - KNB PAX Loring, Richard H., PFC, HQ 57th BW - KNB None None None

Richard H Loring, DNB, Courier Flight 10 May, 1944

Corsica

Richard was with a Red Cross Worker and was on the Courier Ship when it crashed into the mountains of Corsica during bad weather, 10 May, 1944.Carole Chapin, Red Cross Honoree, as well as Edwin "Mike" Elliott, and Pilot (flying as CP this day) Lt Ray Fletcher and the Pilot, Capt Lewis Geerling. 

By Maureen Boyle GateHouse News Service CARVER —   Eileen Maki always believed the remains of Cpl. Richard H. Loring, who crashed into a mountain while on a routine training flight during World War II, would eventually be discovered.  “I never gave up,” said Maki, 83, Carver’s historian. “Even if it was after my time, I knew he would be found.”  Army representatives are to meet with Loring’s relatives soon in Brewster to tell them where and how his remains were found and to help make arrangements for his funeral, the corporal’s grandniece and grandnephew said Friday.  Loring’s relatives said they plan to bury him in the family’s burial plot in Carver with military honors at a date still to be set.  “It is just about having faith,” said Kathryn Beisiegel of Thornton, N.H., Loring’s grandniece whose effort to track the family’s history two years ago helped energize interest in the case.  Loring, who was born in Brockton and raised in Carver, was a member of the 2nd Fighter Squadron, 52nd Fighter Group when the B-25 type aircraft he was in crashed into Monte Cagna, near Sartene, Corsica, on May 10, 1944.  Apparently, the pilot had misjudged the plane’s altitude or bearing in bad weather and crashed into the mountain, the military said last year. The plane exploded on impact.  Loring’s name is listed on a monument across from Carver Town Hall that honors those who served during wartime. His name is followed by a star, the designation given to those killed in action.  The military had been trying to locate Loring’s relatives for DNA samples in case his remains were recovered, but it appears, grandnephew Daniel Lowe said, those samples weren’t needed after all.  “They called and said they didn’t need the DNA sample,” said Lowe, Beisiegel’s brother. “They must have found some type of identification on him or other way to identify him.”  The local search for Loring’s relatives began in 2005, when a genealogist hired by the Army wrote to the Carver reference librarian, and she, in turn, contacted Maki.   Maki tracked the family tree, but hit a dead end until Beisiegel, who lives in Thornton and works in Plymouth, N.H., walked into Carver Town Hall after visiting her parents’ graves with her siblings.  Beisiegel talked with Town Assessor Ellen Blanchard and was quickly put in touch with Maki.   That’s when Beisiegel learned from Maki that the Army had contacted the town looking for relatives.   Beisiegel said she was convinced the remains of her great-uncle, who she never met, would be found.   “I just felt in my heart of hearts it would happen,” she said.    Maureen Boyle can be reached at mboyle@enterprisenews.com

Richard H Loring

Corsica

For 66 years, Cpl. Richard H. Loring was presumed dead after his military aircraft crashed into a mountain during World War II.

Next month, he will finally be put to rest in the family plot at Central Cemetery after his remains, recovered in Italy, were positively identified through DNA, his relatives said.

“It will be a great honor for him,” Loring’s great-nephew, Daniel Lowe of Brewster, said. “He will be in the family plot, right next to his mother.”

Loring’s remains are expected to arrive at Logan International Airport as early as May 7. A service at the United Parish Church is set for 1 p.m. Monday, May 10 - the anniversary of his death. He will be buried after the service.

Loring, who was born in Brockton and raised in Carver, was a member of the 2nd Fighter Squadron 52nd Fighter Group when the B-25 plane he was in crashed into Monte Cagna, near Sartene, Corsica, May 10, 1944. He and four others were on the plane.

Lowe said his family believed Loring’s remains had never been recovered, but they recently learned some evidence had been located as far back as 1944. He said some remains were recovered from the site in 1989 and additional evidence was recovered between 2003 and 2005.

But it wasn’t until this year that Loring’s remains were positively identified, thanks to a DNA match to an elderly relative who Lowe said he didn’t even know he had.

Priscilla Goelet, 94, of Quincy, was Loring’s cousin. Lowe said he was told by the military that her DNA evidence helped identify the remains.

Goelet remembered Loring fondly.

“He was a wonderful fellow,” she said. “He was like a brother to my brother. They used to get together in the summertime. They would go down to Carver. They had a good time.”

Goelet said she kept in touch with Loring during the war.

“I used to write to him and I used to send him magazines,” she said.

Goelet said she has had some contact with the military, but she’s not sure how or when her DNA was obtained.

She is relieved he will finally be put to rest.

 “I am very glad they have found his remains,” Goelet said.

A farmer saw the plane crash in 1944 and had guided two teams to the site, Lowe said. Over the years, others tried to find the wreckage in the rough terrain but were unsuccessful.

“It was just piles and piles of boulders,” Lowe said.

In 1989, though, some evidence and remains were handed over, and additional remains and evidence were recovered later.

The local search for Loring’s relatives began in 2005, when a genealogist hired by the Army wrote to the Carver reference librarian who, in turn, contacted Eileen Maki, 83, Carver’s historian.

Maki was able to track the family tree but hit a dead end until relative Kathryn Beisiegel of Thornton, N.H., walked into Carver Town Hall after visiting her parents’ graves with her siblings.

She was put in touch with Maki and learned the Army was looking for Loring’s relatives. While Beisiegel offered to supply a DNA sample, she was later told it wasn’t needed, but not why.

Beisiegel said she is now thankful her great-uncle is finally returning home.

“I just believed it would happen once this all started,” she said. “I knew it would come to be.”

Richard H Loring (DNB) 52nd Fighter Group, 2nd FS

Corsica

52nd Fighter Group  Constituted as 52nd Pursuit Group (Interceptor) on 20 Nov 1940. Activated on 15 Jan 1941. Redesignated 52nd Fighter Group in May 1942. Trained with P-39 and P-40 aircraft, and participated in maneuvers. Moved to the British Isles, the air echelon arriving in Jul 1942 and the ground echelon in Aug. Received Spitfire aircraft and, as part of Eighth AF, flew missions from England to France during Aug and Sep. The pilots of the group flew Spitfires from Gibraltar to Algeria during the invasion of North Africa on 8 Nov 1942; the remainder of the group, moving by ship from England, arrived after the campaign for Algeria-French Morocco had ended. Assigned first to Twelfth AF and later (after May 1944) to Fifteenth, the group served in combat in the Mediterranean theater until the end of the war. Flew escort, patrol, strafing, and reconnaissance missions to help defeat Axis forces in Tunisia. Took part in the conquest of Sicily. Attacked railroads, highways, bridges, coastal shipping, and other targets to support Allied operations in Italy. Converted to P-51's during Apr-May 1944 and afterwards engaged primarily in escorting bombers that attacked objectives in Italy, France, Germany, Czechoslovakia, Austria, Hungary, Rumania, and Yugoslavia. Received a DUC for a mission of 9 Jun 1944 when the group protected bombers that struck aircraft factories, communications centers, and supply lines in Germany. In addition to escorting bombers of Fifteenth AF, the group made strafing attacks on important targets in Italy, France, central Europe, and the Balkans. Received second DUC for a strafing raid in which the group destroyed a great number of fighter and transport planes on a landing ground in Rumania on 31 Aug 1944. Returned to the US in Aug 1945. Inactivated on 7 Nov 1945.

Richard Loring Brought Home

Carver

10 May, 2010

Army Cpl. Richard Loring laid to rest in Carver Photos Tim Correira/The Enterprise Barbara Lowe and her sister, Kathy Beisiegel, the two oldest living relatives of Cpl. Richard Loring, receive the flag from the coffin during memorial services for their great-uncle in Carver on Monday. Giving the flag to them is Air Force National Guard Brigadier General L. Scott Rice. Tim Correira/The Enterprise Members of the Massachusetts Army National Guard Honor Guard carry the coffin during memorial services for Army Cpl. Richard Loring at Central Cemetery in Carver on Monday. Tim Correira/The Enterprise The American flag lays draped over the coffin of Army Cpl. Richard Loring at United Parish of Carver church on Monday. Tim Correira/The Enterprise Eileen Maki, Carver's town historian, attends the memorial service for Army Cpl. Richard Loring at United Parish of Carver church on Monday. Tim Correira/The Enterprise Members of the Massachusetts Army National Guard Honor Guard fold a flag over the coffin of Army Cpl. Richard Loring during burial services at Central Cemetery in Carver on Monday. Loring’s remains were returned home after 66 years. Tim Correira/The Enterprise Great-niece Barbara Lowe hangs her head as she sits near the coffin during memorial services for Army Cpl. Richard Loring at Central Cemetery in Carver on Monday. Tim Correira/The Enterprise Members of the Massachusetts Army National Guard Honor Guard carry the coffin of Army Cpl. Richard Loring during memorial services at the United Parish of Carver church on Monday. Tim Correira/The Enterprise The Rev. Bruce Bardon gives the eulogy during memorial services at the United Parish of Carver church on Monday. The service was for Army Cpl. Richard Loring. Tim Correira/The Enterprise Members of the Patriot Guard Riders are reflected in the hearse carrying the coffin of Army Cpl. Richard Loring on Monday. Tim Correira/The Enterprise Members of the Patriot Guard Riders carry flags as they head to the cemetery during memorial services for Army Cpl. Richard Loring in Carver on Monday. Tim Correira/The Enterprise Kailin Foley of Carver watches with her two children, 2-year-old Eilis and 4-year-old Seamus, as members of the Massachusetts Army National Guard Honor Guard carry the coffin of Army Cpl. Richard A Loring during services on Monday. Tim Correira/The Enterprise Members of the Patriot Guard Riders hold flags during services for Army Cpl. Richard Loring at the United Parish of Carver church on Monday. Loring’s remains were returned home for burial 66 years after he went missing during World War II. Tim Correira/The Enterprise Great-nephew Dan Lowe gives the eulogy during memorial services for Army Cpl. Richard Loring at the United Parish of Carver church on Monday. Tim Correira/The Enterprise Members of the Massachusetts Army National Guard Honor Guard carry the coffin from the church as members of the Patriot Guard Riders salute during memorial services for Army Cpl. Richard Loring at the United Parish of Carver church on Monday. Tim Correira/The Enterprise Photos and flowers adorn the coffin during memorial services for Army Cpl. Richard Loring at the United Parish of Carver church on Monday. Tim Correira/The Enterprise The hearse carrying Army Cpl. Richard Loring is saluted on its way to Carver's Central Cemetery on Monday. More Photos Related Galleries Army Cpl. Richard Loring laid to rest in Carver By Maureen Boyle Enterprise Staff Writer Posted May 11, 2010 @ 02:32 AM Last update May 11, 2010 @ 08:05 AM CARVER —   As the flag-draped casket passed, 84-year-old Lawrence Gardner stood in silent salute to honor a man he never knew.   He was there, in the rear of the United Parish of Carver church, to pay tribute to Army Cpl. Richard Loring who died in a plane crash 66 years ago during World War II and whose remains were finally recovered and brought home for burial.   Ronald Everette of Middleboro stepped out of the church somberly, thinking of his U.S. Marine father who survived World War II and of those he knew who survived Vietnam.   Bea Kingsbury of Carver was at the Central Cemetery gravesite, as taps were played, as two F15 jets flew over, wiping away a tear.   The 91-year-old woman stood as the American flag was tightly folded then handed to a Loring relative, remembering a husband who had gone to war and come back.   The soldier’s relatives, born years after his death, walked from the cemetery after the military funeral, quietly talking about the man they never met whose return touched them in ways they never expected.   “It’s a very emotional experience,” said Kathryn Beisiegel of Thornton, N.H., Loring’s great-niece. “I was very surprised.”  Her eldest sister, Barbara Lowe, of Brewster, said it was also very touching to see the number of people in town who came out to honor Loring.   More than 100 people – including Gov. Deval Patrick and a contingent of military dignitaries – gathered at the church Monday as Loring’s remains, recovered on a mountainside in Corsica years after World War II ended, were laid to rest.  The 31-year-old Loring, whose remains were finally identified through DNA, was buried 66 years to the day of his death. He joined the Army at age 29.  “Though he was lost, he is now found and his remains are returned home,” said the Rev. Bruce Bardon, pastor of the church.  Loring, who was born in Brockton in 1913 and raised in Carver, was presumed dead when the B-25C aircraft he and four others were in crashed into Mount Cagna in Ciannuccio near Sartene, Corsica, on May 10, 1944.  The wreckage was later found but it took decades to recover and later identify the remains.  State Trooper Doug Loring, a distant cousin, led the motorcycle escort Friday to Carver from Logan Airport after Loring’s remains were flown to Massachusetts. He learned of the search – and services – through Enterprise newspaper reports – and said he now is able to fill out key blocks in his family tree.  Dan Lowe, Loring’s great-nephew, said he grew up hearing stories from his mother about her favorite uncle who died in the war.   “The story was just a footnote in my memory,” he said.  But it was only now, with Loring’s remains returned to Massachusetts, that he knows a little bit more about the man his mother talked about.  The pastor said Loring touched many people in death – even though he knew none of them in life.  “Nobody knew him here,” Bardon said. “Most of the people weren’t born when he died.  Loring, however, on the day of his burial, became a symbol to many at the service of all those who have served in war and survived – and those who served and died.  It was why Mary Sipola of Carver attended the services, to honor her husband who served in Vietnam and died three years ago. He is buried a few feet from Loring’s grave.  It was why 11 members of the Patriot Guard Riders stood at attention outside the church holding American flags.  It was why a mother and father brought their young children to the church.  “Remember the man we have just gotten to know,” Bardon told those who gathered for the services.  Loring was a man with hopes and dreams unrealized, he said.  “Richard was not a statistic,” he said.

"Richard" Loring comes Home

Mass.

By STEVE BROWN Published May 10, 2010

Cpl. Richard Loring with his niece, Jean Cole Lowe, in the early 1940s. (Click to enlarge)

CARVER, Mass. — Barbara Lowe, of Brewster, and her siblings grew up hearing the legend of their great-uncle.   “I know that Uncle Dick was a rear gunner and he was shot down,” Lowe said. “And he was Mom’s favorite uncle, and she talked about him all the time.”   And, for decades, that’s all the family knew. The young man grew up in Carver, went off to war and never returned, dying before Lowe and her sisters and brothers were even born. Lowe’s mother, Jean Cole Lowe, went to her own grave without knowing exactly what happened to her favorite uncle.   Until five years ago, Richard Loring and four others who were on board a B-25 Mitchell nicknamed “Deathwind” were still listed as missing in action on the southern tip of the island of Corsica.

The Briefing   For more than two hours in early April, retired Air Force Maj. Michael Mee explained to Lowe and two of her brothers the details of the crash that killed their great uncle less than a month before the D-Day Invasion. Mee is an identification specialist with the Army’s Casualty and Mortuary Affairs Operations Center. He’s briefed dozens of families of servicemen who were killed in past conflicts.   “It’s an honor and privilege to bring this information to you,” Mee said as he and Capt. Andrew Parris sat around Lowe’s kitchen table for the official briefing on their great uncle’s death.  “These guys were heroes,” Mee said. “These were America’s sons and daughters who went overseas to deploy, and went into harm’s way, and some didn’t come home.”    And for more than 60 years, Richard Loring was one of those heroes who didn’t come home.

 

A WWII-era B-25 Mitchell bomber (Courtesy)

Loring wasn’t assigned to the crew of the B-25, which was flying what was to be a routine supply mission from one side of Corsica to the other. He may have just been hitching a ride, like fellow passenger Carolyn Chapin. Chapin was a correspondent for the American Red Cross, writing articles that brought the Red Cross’s front-line humanitarian efforts back to America.   And while family legend may have been that Loring’s plane was shot down, declassified documents showed soupy weather was to blame.  “They actually hit the side of a mountain that was about 4,000 feet in elevation,” Mee told the family.   “(An eyewitness) heard the airplane overhead, saw it fly into the cloud bank, and he heard an explosion, he heard a crash,” Mee added. “So, whether or not they misjudged the altitude, they had navigational error, (it’s) not quite clear because there were no black boxes back then. You really can’t tell. But weather was a primary role in the crash.”   The plane crashed amid huge boulders on a remote part of Mount Cagna on the island off the coast of France. The five on board probably died instantly as the plane was consumed by fire.

 

The War Department's "Missing Air Crew Report" (Courtesy) (Click to enlarge)

A few days after the crash, local farmers, along with some Corsican gendarmes, made a trek to the crash site and discovered the twisted wreckage, but no human remains were found.   Mee said that over the intervening years there were conflicting reports.   “A team goes up there and says nothing survived that crash, no human remains,” Mee said. “Then you come back later on and teams did find human remains.”   Some locals said they found bones near the wreckage and that they placed the bones in the crevices between the boulders. There was also an unconfirmed report that some villagers buried some remains on another part of the island. Official expeditions were launched but nothing was ever found, and the reports remained unsubstantiated.   That is until 1988, when gendarmes discovered bone fragments at the site and notified the U.S. Embassy in Paris.   But for some unknown reason, the case sat until early 2005, when after four trips to the crash site two French civilians reported that they found more human remains.

A Search Anew    Armed with this new information, the Pentagon dispatched a team from the Joint POW/MIA Accounting Command, or JPAC, to search for the remains of the missing Americans.“I think if you ask everyone here at JPAC they will tell you it’s rewarding on a whole new level,” said Maj. Ramon Osorio, JPAC’s public affairs officer based at Hickam Air Force Base in Hawaii. “It’s rewarding to be part of such an effort.

 

Loring's plane wreckage on Mount Cagna in Corsica, France (Courtesy of JPAC)

“We have several skilled technicians ranging from scientific experts, military operations, planners, civilians, people from all skill sets, all trades, uniquely putting all that talent together into one effort, merging in unison to that one effort and that noble cause of establishing that type of accountability over our service members who have gone missing from past conflicts,” Osorio said.   The JPAC team spent five days at the crash site. Team members scoured the crevices looking for bones and any other personal items that may have survived the crash.   JPAC anthropologist Dr. Matthew Rhode didn’t go on this mission, but is familiar with the case.  “The focus of JPAC is to recover remains,” Rhode said. “And be that as small as a tooth crown, or small bone fragment, that is what we’re trying to do. And the fact that they saw bone the first day, they’d go, ‘Hey, we’re doing it. We’re getting this thing done.’  “And they would have been very motivated to come back every day to continue and move along to make progress on the site,” Rhode added.  With the bones and other remains recovered, the next job was to identify them. And, like an episode of “CSI,” DNA samples were used to sort out the remains.

Returning Home

Back in Loring’s hometown of Carver, traffic moved along Route 58. Drivers appeared unaware of the granite monument bearing the names of those from town who served in World Wars I and II. Loring’s name is etched on that monument with a star to indicate he died in the war.

 

Dr. Andrew Tyrell, the recovery leader of JPAC's Central Identification Laboratory, searches for remains in Corsica. (Courtesy of JPAC)

That’s pretty much the only connection left to the town where he grew up. Nearly all of his contemporaries have since passed away, including his sister, and the niece who idolized him.  Carver Town Administrator Richard LaFond says the town is not too sure how to feel about Loring’s return.  “On one hand, you’re glad you can be a part of history and honoring this person’s service,” LaFond said. “On the other hand, this is a resident of the town who is in many ways a distant memory.”   On Friday, a handful of town officials and local veterans stood at attention as a military honor guard carried Loring’s casket from a hearse into the local funeral home. The procession from Logan Airport to Carver was escorted by State Police trooper Doug Loring, who recently discovered he is a distant cousin of Richard Loring.   Carver will bring out its Fourth of July bunting for Monday’s funeral.   And after a memorial service at the United Parish Church where he once worshiped, Loring will be buried in the family plot next to his mother, sister and niece. Barbara Lowe said that would please her mother.   “She’d be very happy,” Lowe said. “That’s why, as soon as I knew, I said, ‘He has to be buried next to Mom.’ I know she’d be real happy.”

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