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Nazi Germany

(1923—1945)

After World War I, Germany faced a time of depression and political upheaval that created a favorable environment for Hitler and the Nazi Party to take power. During his reign as Führer, Hitler strengthened the German economy and expanded the German Empire, but this aggressive strategy in Europe caused World War II and the deaths of millions of Jews and “undesirables” in concentration camps. The Nazi Reich taught the world how hatred and power could build up a nation, but would ultimately destroy it.

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Berlin, Germany

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Pictures & Records (50)

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Hitler & Troops
Hitler & Troops
Source: http://templars.files.wordpress.com/2007/02/nazi.jpg
United States 101st Airborne takes down Nazi flag
United States 101st Airborne takes down Nazi flag
Hitler Acquires Austria.jpg
Hitler Acquires Austria.jpg
"Hitler accepts the ovation of the Reichstag after announcing the `peaceful' acquisition of Austria. It set the stage to annex the Czechoslovakian Sudetenland, largely inhabited by a German- speaking population." Berlin, March 1938. 208-N-39843.
hitler-wants-us-to-believe.jpg
hitler-wants-us-to-believe.jpg
Found in Library of Congress War Poster Collection
Holocaust1.jpg
Holocaust1.jpg
Holocaust victims
HitertakenParis.jpg
HitertakenParis.jpg
Adolf Hitler in Paris, June 23, 1940. 242-HLB-5073-20.
Page 1
Page 1
The famous Beer hall where Hitler attempted his first coup. This coup failed and Hitler landed in prison where he wrote Mein Kampf.
Page 1
Page 1
Berchtesgaden Now A Gi Rest Stop -- The Eagle'S Nest Atop Obersalzberg Mountain In The Bavarian Alps, Where Hitler In One Of His Intuitive Moods Decided To Attack Russia, Is Now A Rest Lounge For American Soldiers, Shown At Their Ease While One Man Stands
Page 1
Page 1
Berchtesgaden, Germany -- S/Sgt. Raymond R. Reed Of Buffalon Ny, Photographs His Buddies Of The 101St Airborne Division'S 327Th Glider Infantry Regiment Against The Wreckage Of Hitler'S Retreat, Bombed By The Raf On 25 April 1945. Left To Right: Posing F
Sudeten woman unable to conceal misery salutes Hitler 1943.jpg
Sudeten woman unable to conceal misery salutes Hitler 1943.jpg
Prisoners in the concentration camp at Sachsenhausen Germany 19 Dec 1938.jpg
Prisoners in the concentration camp at Sachsenhausen Germany 19 Dec 1938.jpg
Nuremberg Trials.jpg
Nuremberg Trials.jpg
Nazi soldier Belgium Nov 1944.jpg
Nazi soldier Belgium Nov 1944.jpg
Munich Agreement 2.jpg
Munich Agreement 2.jpg
Nazi Germany Leaves League of Nations 2.jpg
Nazi Germany Leaves League of Nations 2.jpg
Nazi Germany Leaves League of Nations.jpg
Nazi Germany Leaves League of Nations.jpg
Nazis and Sudentenland 2.jpg
Nazis and Sudentenland 2.jpg
Nazi Invasion of Poland.jpg
Nazi Invasion of Poland.jpg
Nazi Invasion of Poland 2.jpg
Nazi Invasion of Poland 2.jpg
Americans Take Nazi Stronghold
Americans Take Nazi Stronghold
Source: U.S. Army
Molotov & Ribbentrop sign the German-Soviet non-aggression pact
Molotov & Ribbentrop sign the German-Soviet non-aggression pact
Source: http://media.nara.gov/media/images/28/12/28-1128a.gif
Adolf Hitler
Adolf Hitler
Source:http://www.insidesocal.com/godblog/Hitler.JPG
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Page 681
[None Entered]
Hitler and Mussolini.jpg
Hitler and Mussolini.jpg
Adolf Hitler and Benito Mussolini in Munich, Germany, ca. June 1940. 242-EB-7-38.
Gorman D Fry WW 2
Gorman D Fry WW 2
Gorman D Fry WW 2
Gorman D Fry WW 2
Gorman D Fry 37' WW 2
Gorman D Fry 37' WW 2
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Page 12
[None Entered]
Parisliberation.jpg
Parisliberation.jpg
American troops in tank passing the Arc de Triomphe after the liberation of Paris, August 1944. 208-YE-68.
FDRsocialsecurity.gif
FDRsocialsecurity.gif
President Roosevelt signing Social Security Act of 1935 in the Cabinet Room of the White House. Library of Congress photo, LC-US262-123278.

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Hitler Came to Power Legally?

Berlin, Germany

Adolf Hitler
2 images

Adolf Hitler came to power legally in Germany through intrigue and public approval. After World War I, Hitler joined a small party called the National Socialist German Workers’ Party. The National Socialists or Nazis grew in popularity as conditions in Germany deteriorated. Because many men were left desperate and unemployed, they joined the Nazi party and were recruited into the Nazi Storm Troopers or brown shirts. Hitler used the Storm Troopers to intimidate the German electorate and inspire loyalty amongst party members. Steadily, the Nazis returned more votes each election, aspiring tirelessly for a place in the German government.

Fortunately for the Nazis, the German people were more afraid of Socialists and Communists than a right-wing, nationalist party. Due to this common fear, President von Hindenburg fired Chancellor Kurt von Schleicher when he tried to incorporate trade unionists into the government. This move, widely supported by the German conservatives, required a new Chancellor be appointed. President von Hindenburg appointed Hitler as Chancellor on January 30, 1933. Adolf Hitler brought with him a coalition of Nationalists and other conservatives that were suppose to protect conservative values in Germany, but really worked as a spring-board for Hitler’s agenda.

Once Hitler achieved the position of Chancellor, he took very little time in establishing himself as Führer. The Reichstag fire, an event blamed on the Communists, gave Hitler the justification to suspend constitutional guarantees of personal liberty and the chance to arrest thousands of Communists. Since the government could not convene in the Reichstag, Hitler moved all meetings out to the Garrison Church at Potsdam. There he ceremoniously illustrated his solidarity with the conservatives and Germany’s past. He re-kindled the hope of a German Empire placing himself at the head. After this display, the government passed Hitler’s Enabling Act on March 23, 1933. This became the cornerstone of the Nazi dictatorship and gave the government power to rule by decree for four years. Because of the Enabling Act and the Reichstag fire, most of Hitler’s opponents were in jail, hiding, exiled, or imprisoned in concentration camps. Although Hitler held an extraordinary amount of power, he could not attain complete control while President von Hindenburg lived.

            Conveniently, President von Hindenburg died in August 1934. Hitler presented the people with a plebiscite to combine the offices of President and Chancellor. Almost nine-tenths of the German people voted for the measure. Hitler therefore declared himself Führer, a title which he not only achieved legally but with outrageous public support.

Source Consulted: James Wilkinson and H. Stuart Hughes, Contemporary Europe A History (New Jersey: Prentice Hall, 2004).

Added by Clio

Topic Details

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Major Leaders:
Adolf Hitler: Chancellor, 1933-1945; Führer, 1934-1945 1
Hans Frank: Governor-General of Occupied Poland, perpetuated the Holocaust in Poland. 1
Heinrich Himmler: Head of the German SS, Reichsführer-SS; committed suicide in Luneburg by potassium cyanide 1
Hermann Göring: President of the Reichstag, commander of the Luftwaffe (German Air Force), committed suicide after Nuremberg trials 1
Joseph Goebbels: Minister of Nazi Propaganda; succeeded Hitler as chancellor for one day; On May 1, 1945, he committed suicide 1
Karl Adolf Eichmann: headed Gestapo Department IV B4 for Jewish Affairs; “Jewish Specialist.” 1
Martin Bormann: Head of the Party Chancellery and private secretary to Adolf Hitler. 1
Reinhard Heydrich: Second in SS organization, lead planner of Hitler’s Final Solution. 1
Rudolf Hess: Deputy Führer, number three after Göring. 1
Nazi Strongholds:
Berghof, Hitler's Residence: Berchtesgaden, Germany 1
Capital City: Berlin, Germany 1
Führerhauptquartier Wolfsschanze, Wolf's Lair: Ketrzyn, Poland 1
First day of the Nuremberg Trials:
20 Nov 1945 2
Hermann Göring captured:
09 May 1945 2
Hitler commits suicide in his bunker:
30 Apr 1945 2
Nazi Army invades Denmark and Norway:
09 Apr 1940 2
Nazi Army invades France, Belgium, and Holland:
10 May 1940 2
Nazi Army invades Poland:
01 Sep 1939 2
Nazi Army invades Romania:
07 Oct 1940 2
Nazi Army invades the Soviet Union:
22 Jun 1941 2
Nazi Army occupies Bulgaria:
02 Mar 1941 2
Nazi Army surrenders at Stalingrad:
02 Feb 1943 2
Nazis invade Yugoslavia and Greece:
06 Apr 1941 2
Potsdam Conference dismantles the Nazi state:
August 1945 2
Tripartite (Axis) Pact signed:
27 Sep 1940 2
Anschluss, Germany annexes Austria:
12 Mar 1938 3
Berlin hosts the Olympics:
August 1, 1936 to August 16, 1936 3
Dachau concentration camp opens:
22 Mar 1933 3
Failed Beer Hall Putsch:
1923 3
Hitler appointed Chancellor of Germany:
30 Jan 1933 3
Hitler begins his quest for Lebensraum:
1938 3
Hitler declares himself Fuhrer:
02 Aug 1934 3
Kristallnacht (“Night of Broken Glass”):
09 Nov 1938 3
Mein Kampf (My Struggle) published:
1925 3
Munich Conference:
29 Sep 1938 3
Nazi Army occupies the Rhineland:
06 Mar 1936 3
Nazi Army occupies the Sudetenland:
15 Oct 1938 3
Nazi Army takes Czechoslovakia:
15 Mar 1939 3
Nazi-Soviet Non-Aggression Pact signed:
23 Aug 1939 3
Night of the Long Knives:
30 Jun 1934 3
Nuremberg Laws:
15 Sep 1935 3
Reichstag fire:
27 Feb 1933 3
The Gestapo is created by Hermann Göring:
26 Apr 1933 3
Economy:
Mixed, contained aspects of both a free market and a centrally planned economy. 1
Government:
Totalitarian, Controlled by the Nazi party, built upon Fascist principles but Nazis never declared themselves as Fascist 1
National Anthem:
Deutschlandlied 1
National Flag:
Swastika flag 1
Political Party in power:
National Socialist German Workers Party (NSDAP or Nazi Party) 1

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