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Battle of Gettysburg

(1863)

Union and Confederate soldiers fought for three days on the bloody fields of Gettysburg, Pennsylvania. While the Union could call this battle a victory, nearly 8,000 Americans died. The enormous loss of life prompted President Lincoln to dedicate a cemetery at Gettysburg on November 19, 1863, and give his legendary Gettysburg Address. This Union victory, more than any other battle of the war, ended the Confederacy’s hopes for foreign aide and shattered General Lee’s image of invincibility.

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Gettysburg, PA

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Pictures & Records (55)

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marietepe.jpg
marietepe.jpg
Source: http://historiccamdencounty.com/ccnews111_02_big.jpg.
Gettysburg4.gif
Gettysburg4.gif
Source: Photo by Timothy O'Sullivan.
Gettysburg2.gif
Gettysburg2.gif
Fallen soldier
Gettysburg1.jpg
Gettysburg1.jpg
Source: Gettysburg, Pa. Bodies of Federal soldiers, killed on July 1, near the McPherson woods. Photograph taken by Timothy O'Sullivan. Library of Congress. http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/cwpb.00849
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B-342 View of Gettysburg, PA., 1863.
B-342 View of Gettysburg, PA., 1863.
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Page 1
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B-3298 Gen. George G. Meade.
B-3298 Gen. George G. Meade.
General Meade
The grave of Jenne Wade
The grave of Jenne Wade
Jenne Wade was the only civilian killed during the three day battle. She was bury in Everygreen Cememtary on the Cemetary Hill.
photo of Jennie Wade
photo of Jennie Wade
Old photo of Jenne Wade. Source http://kevintrostle.com/Images/x068JennieWade.jpg
Openning shot of the Battle of Gettysburg
Openning shot of the Battle of Gettysburg
The site of the opening shot of the Battle of Gettysburg
Devil's Den
Devil's Den
The famous Devils Den on the Gettysburg Battlefield
The Peach Orchard
The Peach Orchard
The Famous Peach Orchard at Gettysburg Battlefield
The Railroad Cut
The Railroad Cut
The famous Railroad Cut where hundreds Confederate soldiers were captured on the first day of Battle of Gettysburg.
20th Maine
20th Maine
Site of 20th Maine on the Round top.
Warren's statue on Little Round Top
Warren's statue on Little Round Top
The statue of General Warren on the Little Round Top, he was credited with saving the Little Round Top
Pennsylvania Monument at Gettysburg
Pennsylvania Monument at Gettysburg
Pennsylvania Monument at Gettysburg, it contains names of 34000 Pennsylvanian who took part in the Battle of Gettysburg.
culp Hill
culp Hill
The Culp Hill which marks the northern flank of the Union line.
The Tomb of General Robert E. Lee
The Tomb of General Robert E. Lee
The tomb of General Robert E. Lee at Lee's Chapel in Lexington, Virginia.
The Tomb of General Robert E.Lee
The Tomb of General Robert E.Lee
The tomb of General Robert E. Lee at Lee's Chapel in Lexington, Virginia.
Plaque to Gettysburg Address
Plaque to Gettysburg Address
A plaque at Gettysburg pointing to the site of Gettysburg Address
Address Plaque
Address Plaque
A memorial to the Gettysburg Address at Soldier's National Cemetery.
Unknown Bodies
Unknown Bodies
A mass grave at Soldier's National Cememtary in Gettysburg showing the high cost of the Battle.
Soldier Memorial
Soldier Memorial
The Soldier Memorial in the Soldier's National Cemetery, it is over the site of Lincoln's Gettysburg Address. Note each square stone marker marks grave of an unknown Union Soldier.
North Carolina memorial
North Carolina memorial
North Carolina's memorial to her brave men who took part in Pickett's Charge. Most of men in the Charge are from North Carolina.
General Robert E. Lee
General Robert E. Lee
Virginia's Memorial to her brave soldiers who took part in Packett's Charge. The status General Robert E. Lee is on the top.
Copse Of Tree
Copse Of Tree
The Copse of Tree from the open field, and this would be the view for Pickett's men.
Lewis Armistead
Lewis Armistead
The spot where the Brig. General Lewis Armistead from Pickett's Divison fell here in the Angle. Ironically, his uncle was the commander of Fort McHenry during the British Bombardment.
North Carolina Plaque
North Carolina Plaque
A plaque erected by North Carolina describing the braves deeds of her men.

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Stories

Marie Tepe

marietepe.jpg

Vivandieres were women who served in the Civil War by traveling with the army as cooks, nurses, mascots, and soldiers. Marie Tepe belonged to this class of women and fought at the Battle of Gettysburg. Born in France in 1834, she immigrated to the United States and married a tailor in Philadelphia. When the Civil War broke out she joined the military with her husband and served with the 27th Pennsylvania Infantry, Co. I and 114th Pennsylvania Infantry. At the Battle of Fredericksburg she was shot in the ankle, after the Battle of Chancelorsville she received the Kearney Cross, and at the Battle of Gettysburg she nursed the injured for weeks after the three-day conflict. Many of the men called her “French Mary”, but whatever her name, this courageous woman served her country at a time when staying out of the battle was easy and accepted. Hundreds of women served on both sides during the Civil War, and the service by these Vivandieres will never be forgotten by the soldiers whose lives they saved.

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Jennie Wade, the only civilian killed

Gettysburg, PA

The grave of Jenne Wade
2 images

Gettysburg had a population of 2400, despite of the three days of heavy fighting, only one civilian was killed. Her name was Jennie Wade, she was tired of hiding in the cellar, so she went to her kitchen to get something to eat.  A stray bullet came through the door and killed her. She was buried in Evergreen Cemetary on the Cemetary Hill.

Wesley Culp, the sad homecoming

Gettysburg, Pennsylvania

Wesley Culp

Wesley Culp was born in Gettysburg and grew up on the farm owned by his grandfather, Henry Culp which contains the famous Culp Hill. He was born in 1839 and in 1858, he moved 45 miles to Shepherdstown, Virginia (West Virginia today), and in 1862, he joined the 2nd Virginia of the Stonewall Brigade.  This brigade was attached to the First Corp, under Ewell.

On morning of July 3, before Pickett's Charge, the 2nd VA was fighting at the Culp Hill, and Wesley was killed somewhere on the Culp Hill. His family in Gettysburg heard that he was killed and tried to locate his body afterward, but only found a rifle bearing his name. Thus, Wesley Culp had the distinction of die in battle on the land named after his grandfather.

As example of brother against brother, Wesley Culp's brother was a private in the Fourth Corp of the Union Army. Wesley was member of Ewell's Corp which fought the Fourth Corp in the Battle of Winchester in June, 1863. The Culp were on the opposite side on this battle.

General Howard and Sickles

Gettysburg, Pennsylvania

sickle's leg
7 images

During the Chancellorsville Campaign, the Eleventh Corp under General Howard was positioned on the right flank of the Union line. Howard lefted his flank up in the air. Seeing this, Confederate General Stonewall Jackson decided to attack the Eleventh Corp. The Eleventh Corp collapsed quickly and created a panic that caused the rest of the Union Army to collapse.

In the main time, the III Corp was position in the center of the Union line, its commander General Sickles decided to move his corp forward in a salient at Hazel Grove. While this salient seperated Jackson's Corp from rest of the Confederate Army, it was dangerous exposed and got attacked from both flanks, like being in a nutcracker. The III Corp also collapsed and adding to the confusing.

One the first day of the Battle of Gettysburg, the commander of the Union Army, John Reynolds was killed and the command was passed on to Howard. Howard decided to position his Eleventh Corp with flank up in the air again. Again, Confederate General Jubal Early took advantage of this and rolled up the Eleventh Corp and it made panic withdrew to the Cemetery Hill. Fortunately, General Hancock arrived in time to take replace Howard and prevented another Chancellorsville.

One the second day of battle, General Sickles again decided to move his III Corp forward in an exposed position, and even worse, he lefted a gap in the left side Union line, which included the Little Roundtop. Once again the exposed salient got attack from both sides, and again got crushed like a nut in a nutcracker, only the quick thinking General Warren who moved men ( including 20th Maine) to the Little Roundtop and General Hancock who ordered the First Minnesota into the gap left by the III Corp to buy him sometime, so he can get reinforcements. First Minnesota lost over 80% of it men, but they brought an extra eight minutes for reinforcement to arrive, thus, avoiding another Chancellorsville.

The moral to the story is "those who failed to learn from history, are doomed to repeat it"

General Sickles was directing the battle on a horse when leg was shot off by a cannon ball and was taken from the field and never commanded again. He placed the leg in a small coffin and donated it to the  National Museum of Health and Medicine.  Sickles die in 1914, it was noted he had visited his leg many times in the Museum! This Museum is now a part of the Walter Reed Hospital.

Howard and Eleventh Corp redeemed themselves when they helped General T. Sherman in capturing Atlanta and General Hooker in capturing the Lookout Mountain in Chattanooga. Later in life, Howard founded the famous Howard University in Washinton DC in 1867. In 1877,  the Nez Perce led by Chief Joseph were trying to escape to Canada. Howard led an army in pursue, the Nez Perce managered to stay miles ahead of Howard, until Nelson Miles Army came along and blocked their path only miles from the Canadian border. Howard was on hand to accept Chief Joseph's famous surrender "My heart is sick and sad. From where the sun now stands I will fight no more forever." 

Event Details

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Confederate Casualties:
Number of Soldiers: 75,000 1
Soldiers captured or missing: 5,250 1
Soldiers killed: 2,600-4,500 1
Soldiers wounded: 12,800 1
Total casualties: 20,650-25,000 1
Date:
From: 01 Jul 1863 2
To: 03 Jul 1863 2
Event:
Name: Battle of Gettysburg 2
Major Events First Day:
10:30am: Major General John Reynolds shot and killed by a bullet. Major General Abner Doubleday takes command of the Union Force 3
2:10pm: General Robert E. Lee arrives 2
3:00pm: Confederate Major General Robert Rhode's division launches an attack. With five brigades, it's the largest division; 2
5:00pm: Confederates appear to have won the day 2
7:30am: First shot by Lieutenant Marcellus Jones (Union) 2
After midnight: Union General Meade arrives and decides to stay and fight 2
Major Events Second Day:
4:00pm: Longstreet's troops attack (Confederate); for the next 3 hours, a battle raged across Wheatfield. 3
7:00pm: In a desperate defensive position on Little Round Top, Chamberlain gives the order, "Bayonet!", and the Union men charge 2
8:00pm: Fighting between Brigadier Gen. Greene's brigade and Maj Gen. Johnson's division becomes intense across Cemetery Hill 2
Overnight: In Meade's headquarters (Union), he takes a vote from his generals and they decide to stay and fight. 2
Major Events Third Day:
1:00pm: Stuart leads his Confederate Calvary around to confront the Union rear, including Brigadier Gen. George Armstrong Custer 3
1:07pm: Confederates harden the attack on Cemetery Ridge. The Union side retaliates. There are almost two hours of cannon fire 3
4:00pm: The high water mark of the Confederacy is reached and the survivors retreat 3
4:30am: Union troops renew the fight at Culp's Hill. Attacks and counterattacks continue for nearly seven hours. 3
8:30am: 20 year old Jenny Wade is shot by a stray bullet in her sister's kitchen. She is the only civilian killed in the war 3
Between 2:00pm and 3:00pm: Major General George E. Pickett leads Pickett's Charge. 3
Major Military Leaders:
Confederate: General Robert E. Lee 2
Confederate: Maj. General George E. Pickett 2
Confederate: Lt. Gen. James Longstreet 2
Confederate: Lt. General Richard S. Ewell 2
Union: Major General George Gordon Meade 2
Union: Gen. John F. Reynolds 2
Union: Brig. General Gouveneur K. Warren 2
President Lincoln gives "Gettysburg Address":
19 Nov 1863 4
Place:
Location: Gettysburg, Pennsylvania 2
Union Casualties:
Number of Soldiers: 97,000 2
Soldiers captured/missing: 5,365 2
Soldiers killed: 3,155 2
Soldiers wounded: 14,530 2
Total casualties: 23,040 2

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