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Brown vs. Board of Education

(1952—1954)

After the Supreme Court ruling of Plessy v. Ferguson in 1896, the doctrine of “separate but equal” applied to all segregated facilities throughout America. However, in May 1954, the Supreme Court ruled against this “separate but equal” doctrine in favor of school integration. It reasoned that “separate” inherently meant unequal. This epoch decision added credibility to civil rights movements in the South, and became a precedent for future court decisions regarding race relations in America.

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An integrated classroom
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Oliver Brown agreed to be a plaintiff the case on behalf of his daughter se
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School integration in Tennessee, angle 1
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School integration in Tennessee, angle 2
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George Hayes, Thurgood Marshall and James Nabrit in front of the Supreme Court, 1954. Photo: Cass Gilbert/Corbi
1954-May-18 FSView & The Florida Flambeau, Page 1
1954-May-18 FSView & The Florida Flambeau, Page 1
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1954-Jun-4 The Malakoff News, Page 1
1954-Jun-4 The Malakoff News, Page 1

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Newspapers React to Supreme Court Decision

1954-May-18 FSView & The Florida Flambeau, Page 1
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 Southern states, and many of the states bordering the south, did not react well to the Brown v. Board of Education decision to integrate public schools. These newspaper articles report on the anger directed toward the Supreme Court and the various options southern states debated to get around the decisions. From creating state-subsidized private schools to completely ignoring the decision, southern states sought a number of alternatives to avoid the objectionable ruling. However, change did come in the South, and more often than not, it came violently.

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Event Details

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Cases Included with Brown:
Delaware: Francis B. Gebhart v. Ethel Louise Belton 1
Prince Edward County, Virginia: Dorothy E. Davis v. County School Board 1
South Carolina: Harry Briggs, Jr. v. R.W. Elliott 1
Washington, D.C.: Spottswood Thomas Bolling v. C. Melvin Sharpe 1
Event:
Also known as: Case citation: 347 U.S. 483 1
Name: Oliver Brown, et. al v. Board of Education of Topeka 1
Justices of the Supreme Court:
Additional Justices: Hugo Black, Stanley Reed, Felix Frankfurter, William Douglas, Robert Jackson, Harold Burton, Tom Clark, Sherman Minton 1
Chief Justice: Earl Warren 1
Supreme Court Vote: Unanimous, 9 for 9 1
Lawyers for Plaintiffs:
NAACP Laywers: Thurgood Marshall, Charles E. Bledsoe, Charles Scott, Robert L. Carter, Jack Greenberg 1
Case first argued:
09 Dec 1952 1
Case reargued:
08 Dec 1953 1
Date decision handed down:
17 May 1954 1
Place:
Location: Washington, D.C. 1
Quote:
Chief Justice Earl Warren: “We conclude that in the field of public education the doctrine of "separate but equal" has no place.” 1

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  1. Contributed by Clio
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