Summary

Birth:
28 May 1899 1
Death:
24 Jul 1977 2
Jul 1977 1
Home, North Sacramento, CA 2
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Pictures & Records (10)

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Victor Lo Forte
Victor Lo Forte
Vic Lo Forte at a retirement ceremony for a friend. The whole crew he was
Vic Sr., Joe & Adeline in front of house
Vic Sr., Joe & Adeline in front of house
Taken before the flood. Then they "put it on stilts and built walls around them" to make it a two-story house that wouldn't be flooded.
Bob Koker Retirement 1937
Bob Koker Retirement 1937
Southern Pacific Railroad Shops & Foundry in Sacramento, California
P01-3b Dad 38, 1939(2)_edited-1.jpg
P01-3b Dad 38, 1939(2)_edited-1.jpg
Victor Sr. in 1940
IMG0014_edited-1.jpg
IMG0014_edited-1.jpg
Vic Sr and family. Vic is second from Left in back.
LOFORT07_edited.jpg
LOFORT07_edited.jpg
Vic Sr, and some of his family...three generations, Vic Sr, his son and grandson (and wife).
LOFORT08.jpg
LOFORT08.jpg
Four generations of eldest sons. Do you notice how they've gotten taller as time has passed?
Vic Lo Forte Sr, Rose,Adeline,Joe,Gladys,Fran,and Vic Jr_edited-1.jpg
Vic Lo Forte Sr, Rose,Adeline,Joe,Gladys,Fran,and Vic Jr_edited-1.jpg
Inghilleri, Maria & Kids - Ships Manifest Entry New Orleans
Inghilleri, Maria & Kids - Ships Manifest Entry New Orleans
Maria Inghilleri & kids; Rosalia, Vito & Ursula Lo Forte Arrived in New Orleans Apr 1904. Vito was not allowed in the US and returned to Piana under care of Giuseppe Capaci.
Lo Forte, Vito - Ships Manifest final entry through New Orleans.jpg
Lo Forte, Vito - Ships Manifest final entry through New Orleans.jpg

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Personal Details

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Full Name:
Victor Loforte 1
Birth:
28 May 1899 1
Death:
24 Jul 1977 2
Jul 1977 1
Home, North Sacramento, CA 2
Cause: Heart Attack 2
Residence:
Last Residence: Sacramento, CA 1
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Social Security:
Card Issued: California 1
Social Security Number: ***-**-2539 1

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Stories

Vic III's Memories

Herriman, Utah

I don't think he retired from the railroad.  When I was older than the railroad incident (Mutual age ~12y) his garage was his 'shop' for his plumbing business.  Before second, he work for A.J. Sweet plumbing, maybe A.W. Sweet but I think he really disagreed with the owners over something (seems like it was behavior/attitude/policies or forcing unionizaton -- Gpa was adamantly against unions and in favor of agency.  So by the time I could drive (if not sooner) Grandpa started his own plumbing business.  I believe he retired from his own plumbing business.  

His garage was on the south side of the house with the little well out front, with a driveway that went from the road to the face of the garage, and the garage face was set back about 40 feet from the face of the house.  There was a car port in front of the garage that was big enough for 1 or two vehicles.  The garage had a large window and an entrance door just to the right side of the window.  You go in the door and that is where his office was. 

UNDER the office was a dugout that he kept covered with planks.  No it wasn't for the still.  It was for mechanic work.  Before the window and door were there, he could drive the car into the garage, crawl into th dugout, and do car work on the underside of the vehicle.  It was later that he converted it to the office.   Entering the hall, there was some kind of room to the left.  I dunno anymore what it was.  To the right was a pipes and fittings storage room.  It was very simple but very functional.  That is the room where I helped him wire 3-way lights (my first 3-way job).  Further ahead (west) down the hallway was the main shop (later main room).  He had a wood burning stove just to the left as you enter the room.  That is also where he had the two deer heads hanging on the left (south) walll.  You could open the back of the  garage to bring a vehicle in.  He had an out-door on the same end as the furnace but on the opposite side of the hall.  It went out to the pumproom and to his awesome garden...   I mean awesome! 

That's another account. I'll tell you about his shoveling strategy... Well, I'll tell you now:  I went out to the garden when he was working it.  He was digging and turning the soil with his hand shovel.  (He had spent years prepping and building the soil -  adding all the right stuff to make it rich.  Anyway, I asked him if he turned the whole yard by shovel.  He said 'yes'.  I asked him if it was hard or how he didn't get worn out.  He said he did the whole job by just doing lots of small shovel fulls.  Snce that conversation, I have used that strategy on many big projects to prevent getting burned out.  

Oh, the dogs' yard was outside adjacent the pipe room.  Let's see, there was Liver (black dog) and...I forget the other two dogs.  And there was a fig tree between the kennel and the back of the house.  REAL FIGS!

It was Liver and Onions, the black dogs, I don't remember a third dog. Grandma and Grandpa had a write up in the Sacramento Bee, was titled "Liver and Onions every day and no heartburn", it went on to mention that Gladys and Victor LoForte had liver and onions every day, and talks about the dogs. I will see if we still have that somewhere and post it. I would like to take this time to thank Anne for all the hard work she does for this family. I'll get my mom to help with some of these memories pretty soon.

Grandma and Grandpa had two sets of black labs that they named Liver and Onions. When Great Grandpa John Acuna died in 1964, Grandma kept his dog Dotie. She was a little black and white long haired puppy.

Speaking of Grandpa's 'office', we always called it the shed. That's where Grandma and Grandpa always held their big family get togethers and 'buck stew' dinners with their Druid friends. The office was the 'bar'. As you entered thru the next door, two restrooms were on the left. You would then step down into the big 'garage/shed' where we had many holiday parties. Good Memories!

Hi Yvonne, I remember Dotie. I didn't know that she came from Grandpa Acuna.

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