Summary

Conflict Period:
World War II 1
Branch:
Army 1
Rank:
Second Lieutenant 1
Birth:
31 Jan 1919 2
Cairo, Georgia 1
Death:
Oct 1972 2
Stamford, Connecticut 1
More…

Related Pages

+
View more similar pages

Pictures & Records (20)

Add
JackieRobinson
JackieRobinson
Jackie Robinson UCLA 1941
Jackie Robinson UCLA 1941
Jackie Robinson in the Army
Jackie Robinson in the Army
Jackie Robinson
Jackie Robinson
Robinson to E Frederick Morrow 1957
Robinson to E Frederick Morrow 1957
Telegram from Jackie Robinson to presidential assistant E Frederick Morrow August 13, 1957 Source: The National Archives http://www.archives.gov/education/lessons/jackie-robinson/index.html
Robinson to Eisenhower 1958 page 1
Robinson to Eisenhower 1958 page 1
Letter from Jackie Robinson to President Dwight Eisenhower May 13, 1958 page 1 Source: The National Archives http://www.archives.gov/education/lessons/jackie-robinson/index.html
Robinson to Eisenhower 1958 page 2
Robinson to Eisenhower 1958 page 2
Letter from Jackie Robinson to President Dwight Eisenhower May 13, 1958 page 2 Source: The National Archives http://www.archives.gov/education/lessons/jackie-robinson/index.html
Nixon to Robinson draft 1960 page 1
Nixon to Robinson draft 1960 page 1
Draft of a letter from Vice President Richard Nixon to Jackie Robinson November 4, 1960 page 1 Source: The National Archives http://www.archives.gov/education/lessons/jackie-robinson/index.html
Nixon to Robinson draft 1960 page 2
Nixon to Robinson draft 1960 page 2
Draft of a letter from Vice President Richard Nixon to Jackie Robinson November 4, 1960 page 2 Source: The National Archives http://www.archives.gov/education/lessons/jackie-robinson/index.html
Robinson to Kenndey 1961 pg 1
Robinson to Kenndey 1961 pg 1
Letter from Jackie Robinson to President John F Kennedy February 9, 1961 page 1 Source: The National Archives http://www.archives.gov/education/lessons/jackie-robinson/index.html
Robinson to Kenndey 1961 pg 2
Robinson to Kenndey 1961 pg 2
Letter from Jackie Robinson to President John F Kennedy February 9, 1961 page 1 Source: The National Archives http://www.archives.gov/education/lessons/jackie-robinson/index.html
Robinson to Kennedy 1963 page 1
Robinson to Kennedy 1963 page 1
Telegram from Jackie Robinson to John F Kennedy February 9, 1961 page 1 Source: The National Archives http://www.archives.gov/education/lessons/jackie-robinson/index.html
Robinson to Kennedy 1963 page 2
Robinson to Kennedy 1963 page 2
Telegram from Jackie Robinson to John F Kennedy February 9, 1961 page 2 Source: The National Archives http://www.archives.gov/education/lessons/jackie-robinson/index.html
Robinson to Kennedy 1963 page 3
Robinson to Kennedy 1963 page 3
Telegram from Jackie Robinson to John F Kennedy February 9, 1961 page 3 Source: The National Archives http://www.archives.gov/education/lessons/jackie-robinson/index.html
Robinson to Johnson 1965
Robinson to Johnson 1965
Telegram from Jackie Robinson to Lindon Johnson March 9, 1965 Source: The National Archives http://www.archives.gov/education/lessons/jackie-robinson/index.html
Robinson to Johnson 1967 pg 1
Robinson to Johnson 1967 pg 1
Letter from Jackie Robinson to President Lindon Johnson April 18, 1967 page 1 Source: The National Archives http://www.archives.gov/education/lessons/jackie-robinson/index.html
Robinson to Johnson 1967 pg 2
Robinson to Johnson 1967 pg 2
Letter from Jackie Robinson to President Lindon Johnson April 18, 1967 page 2 Source: The National Archives http://www.archives.gov/education/lessons/jackie-robinson/index.html
Robinson to Elliott 1972
Robinson to Elliott 1972
Letter from Jackie Robinson to presidential assistant Roland L. Elliott April 20, 1972 Source: The National Archives http://www.archives.gov/education/lessons/jackie-robinson/index.html
Hall Of Fame Class Of 1962
Hall Of Fame Class Of 1962
In this July 23, 1962, file photo, Hall of Famers, from left, Edd Roush, Jackie Robinson, Bob Feller and Bill McKechnie, hold the plaques presented to them in Cooperstown, N.Y.
Jackie Robinson
Jackie Robinson
In 1945, UCLA football star and Army lieutenant Jackie Robinson hit .387 as the Monarchs' shortstop. He became the first Monarch to make the jump to white baseball, signing with the Brooklyn Dodgers in 1946.

Add a photo or record for Jack Robinson

Add
Show More

Personal Details

Edit
Full Name:
Jack Roosevelt "Jackie" Robinson 3
Full Name:
Jack Robinson 2
Also known as:
Jackie Robinson 3
Birth:
31 Jan 1919 2
Cairo, Georgia 3
Male 3
Death:
Oct 1972 2
Stamford, Connecticut 3
Cause: heart attack 3
Residence:
Place: Pasedena, CA 3
From: 1920 3
Edit

World War II 1

Branch:
Army 1
Rank:
Second Lieutenant 1
Service Start Date:
1942 1
Service End Date:
1944 1
Edit
Occupation:
Professional Baseball Player 3
Race or Ethnicity:
African American 3
Employment:
Employer: Brooklyn Dodgers 3
Position: Professional Baseball Player 3
Place: Brooklyn, NY 3
Start Date: 15 Apr 1947 3
End Date: 10 Oct 1956 3
Education:
Institution: UCLA 3
Place: Los Angeles, CA 3
From: 1939 3
To: 1941 3
WWII Enlistment:
03 Apr 1942 4
National League MVP:
1947 3
National League MVP:
1949 3
World Series Champion:
1955 3
Social Security:
Social Security Number: ***-**-1990 2

Looking for more information about Jack Robinson?

Search through millions of records to find out more.

Stories

Jackie Robinson breaks major league color barrier

Brooklyn, New York

Jackie Robinson breaks major league color barrier

On April 15, 1947, Jackie Robinson becomes the first African-American in the major leagues when he plays his first game with the Brooklyn Dodgers.

Jack Roosevelt Robinson was born into a family of sharecroppers on January 31, 1919, in Cairo, Georgia. He attended UCLA, where he became the first athlete to letter in four varsity sports: baseball, basketball, football and track. He served in the U.S. Army from 1942 to 1944 and was honorably discharged after facing insubordination charges for refusing to move to the back of a segregated bus.

After leaving the military, Robinson played shortstop for the Kansas City Monarchs in the Negro League. In 1945, he was recruited by Dodgers president and general manager Branch Rickey, who was determined to end the unwritten segregation rule in the majors. In 1946, Robinson joined the Dodgers’ farm team, the Montreal Royals, and went on to lead the league in batting. On April 15, 1947, 28-year-old Jackie Robinson made his Major League Baseball debut with the Dodgers, against the Boston Braves, in front of more than 25,000 spectators at Ebbets Field in Brooklyn, New York. Robinson played first base and went zero for three at the plate.

During his first season in the majors, Robinson encountered racism from opposing teams and fans, as well as some of his own teammates. However, the abuse didn’t affect his performance on the baseball field. Robinson played in 151 games, hit .297, stole more bases than anyone else in the National League and was awarded the first-ever Rookie of the Year title. In 1949, Robinson, who had switched to playing second base, was named the National League’s Most Valuable Player. The next year he became the Dodgers’ highest paid player, earning a salary of $35,000. In 1955, Robinson helped the Dodgers defeat the New York Yankees to win the World Series. He retired from baseball after playing his last game on October 10, 1956, with a career batting average of .311, 1,518 hits and 137 home runs.

After leaving baseball, Robinson worked as a business executive and continued his involvement in civil rights causes. On October 24, 1972, he died at age 53 from heart problems and complications related to diabetes. Robinson became the first African-American inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1962, his first year of eligibility. In 1997, on the 50th anniversary of his historic first game in the majors, Robinson’s uniform number--42--was retired by Major League Baseball.

http://www.history.com/this-day-in-history.do?action=Article&id=57535

Civil Rights Related Letters

Robinson to E Frederick Morrow 1957
14 images

Even outside his career in baseball, Jackie Robinson was a powerful advocate of the civil rights movement. 

This series of letters from the National Archives details some of his civil rights related communication with presidents and others at the White House

About this Memorial Page

×