Summary

Birth:
26 Jul 1936 1
July 24, 1936 2
Death:
15 Jun 1994 1
June 12, 1994 2
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Full Name:
Dr James L Brock 2
Full Name:
J L Brock 1
Also known as:
Jim Brock 2
Birth:
26 Jul 1936 1
July 24, 1936 2
Death:
15 Jun 1994 1
June 12, 1994 2
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Social Security:
Card Issued: Unknown Code (PE) 1
Social Security Number: ***-**-8496 1

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Stories

John McCain

Washington, D.C.- Senator John McCain spoke on the floor of the United States Senate today regarding the death of Arizona State University Baseball Coach Jim Brock, and gave the following remarks: Mr. President, on Sunday, June 12, 1994, Arizona State University's baseball coach, Jim Brock, passed away. During the past year, Coach Brock was engaged in a fierce battle against cancer. His illness took a heavy toll and extracted a great price. But through it all Jim Brock displayed the tenacity, courage, and the heart he required of his teams. Coach Brock proved to all of us that even if you don't always win you can, still be a winner. Over his 23-year baseball coaching career at Arizona State, Jim Brock won 1100 games, two NCAA Division 1 championships, appeared in 13 World Series, and finished second four times. Four of his teams won over 60 games during the season and Jim Brock received Coach of the Year honors in 1977 and 1981. Continuing the tradition established by Bobby Winkles, Coach Brock developed one of the premier college baseball programs in the country. A perennial powerhouse built on talent, determination and intense competitive fire, ASU's baseball dynasty flourished under the stewardship of Jim Brock. Perhaps his greatest legacy is the youth he served so well. Jim Brock's impact on his players is legendary, and these remarkable individuals have gone on to distinguish themselves in all facets of life. A source of tremendous pride to their families and Arizona State University, these men and women lead by example. Jim Brock's lasting impression on professional baseball is noteworthy. It is reported that approximately 64 current and former major leaguers are Jim Brock proteges. The list includes some great players, among these are Barry Bonds, Mike Devereaux, Hubie Brooks, Bump Wills, Floyd and Alan 

Bannister, Oddibe McDowell, Ken Landreaux, and Pat Listach. There are many common threads among these ballplayers. One that is indisputable is that they learned how to win under the auspices and tutelage of Jim Brock. But there are other valuable lessons Jim Brock taught his players and those who follow ASU baseball. Jim Brock showed all Americans that life, like baseball, poses many challenges. He proved that no matter how formidable the challenge may be, one must never give up hope. One must forever strive to prevail. Like former North Carolina basketball coach Jim Valvano, Jim Brock showed all of us, that winning isn't everything. How one conducts their life and how they confront the challenges they face is a greater testament of the individual. In fact, it is a far more lasting legacy than one's won-loss record. The State of Arizona and Arizona State University have lost a good friend, mentor, and leader. We will never forget Jim Brock the coach and his exceptional accomplishments. But I shall also remember Jim Brock the man. His indomitable spirit, strength of character, and enduring courage was a source of inspiration to us all. Our thoughts and prayers are with his wife and family

Jim Brock, 57, Baseball Coach Who Led Collegiate Champions

Jim Brock, the Arizona State baseball coach who turned an interim assignment as a fill-in with a championship team into a 23-year career as one of the nation's most successful college coaches, died Sunday night at Desert Samaritan Hospital in Mesa, Ariz. He was 57.

An Arizona State spokesman said the cause of death was liver and colon cancer, the disease Brock had been fighting for 11 months, most spectacularly during the early rounds of this year's College World Series in Omaha.

Until he was forced to return to the hospital before last Tuesday's game against Miami, the only concession Brock made to the disease was to install a plastic lawn chair in the dugout. The empty chair was there when the Sun Devils beat the Hurricanes, 9-5, for Brock's 1,100th victory, a plateau only six other coaches have ever reached. Eighth Among Active Coaches

A 6-1 loss to Oklahoma, the tournament's eventual winner, on Thursday, brought his record to 1,100-440, a .714 winning percentage that is the 16th highest among all coaches and eighth among those active last season.

For Brock, a native of Phoenix and a 1958 graduate of Arizona State, his career was largely an accident.

Brock, who had coached Mesa Community College to back-to-back national junior college championships, was working on a doctorate in educational administration at Arizona State in 1971. That happened to be the year when Bobby Winkles, who had pioneered in the Sun Devil baseball program, winning three national titles in 13 years, left after the season to become a coach for the California Angels.

Unable to find an experienced Division I coach with sufficient stature to take Winkles's place, the athletic director, Fred Miller, hired Brock as a temporary replacement while he continued his search. Twelve World Series

After Brock steered the team to a 64-6 record and second place in the College World Series in 1972, he had all the Division I stature he needed.

Over the next decades his teams made 12 more trips to the College World Series, finishing second three other times and winning the championship twice, in 1977 and 1981. Those titles made Brock the only coach to have won national championships with American Legion, junior college and major college teams.

As the coach of one of the most successful college teams, Brock had an edge in recruiting top high school talent. He sent an average of more than seven players a year into the professional ranks, among them Barry Bonds, Bob Horner and Mike Devereaux. Wife Passed Him News

Brock, who set an Arizona State record with 65 victories in 1976 (65-10), had his only losing season (31-35) in 1985, a year after the school was stripped of 14 baseball scholarships because of irregularities in a work-study program.

Brock was in the hospital when his team lost on Thursday, finishing in a third-place tie, but after his wife relayed the news to him, he issued a statement for the Sun Devil players who had worn his No. 33 taped to their caps.

"It was a wonderful season," he said.

He is survived by his wife, Pat; a daughter, Cathi, and a son, Jim Jr.

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