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"Massacre at Muddy Creek"

It is generally thought that Frederick Michael married Catherine Vanderpool in Augusta County, Virginia, but it is possible the marriage took place in Tulpehocken (Palatine) settlement in Pennsylvania. It is believed that Catherine was a daughter of Abraham Vanderpool. About 1743 Frederick and his family migrated to the lower branch of the Potomac, not far from Moorefield in Hampshire County, Virginia. They, along with the Yoakums and Harness'.were among the first settlers of that region.

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Notes for Frederick Michael SEE (ZEH)

It is generally thought that Frederick Michael married Catherine Vanderpool in Augusta County, Virginia, but it is possible the marriage took place in Tulpehocken (Palatine) settlement in Pennsylvania. It is believed that Catherine was a daughter of Abraham Vanderpool. About 1743 Frederick and his family migrated to the lower branch of the Potomac, not far from Moorefield in Hampshire County, Virginia. They, along with the Yoakums and Harness'.were among the first settlers of that region.

Frederick See built his cabin home along the Greenbriar river on what was called Muddy Creek. In 1755, war broke out between France and England and the French incited the native Indians to make war on the back-country inhabitants of Virginia. In 1762, after the Greenbrier settlement was renewed, it was felt that it was now safe for settlers to migrate back to the area. They were wrong.

The story of Frederick and Catherine See and their family is quite tragic. The following account of what has become known as "The Muddy Creek Massacre" has been gleaned from various accounts, primarily "A Chronicle of the See family and their Kindred", written and compiled by Irene See Brasel (1892-1963).

On Saturday, July 16, 1763, a party of 80 or 90 Shawnees, led by Chief Cornstalk and assisted by the great War Chief Puksinwah, having crossed over the Ohio River, swept up the Kanawha on a murderous rampage. Simultaneously they hit the Frederick See family, and the Felty Yocum family (Felty was a cousin of Frederick Michael See) whose cabin was nearby. According to all accounts, the Indians suddenly appeared at the Frederick See cabin, with all of the appearance of friendship.

The Sees welcomed them, and as it was near to mealtime they offered to share their food with the Indians. The Shawnees agreed, no doubt building cooking fires out of doors in order to feed such a large number of people. The meal finished, the Indians lounged around for a bit and rested. Suddenly with a whoop the Indians fell upon their hosts, killing the father (Fredrick Michael) , his son-in-law (Littleberry Roach) and Felty Yocum , scalping them before the eyes of their families. It is not known why Frederick and Catherine's son George wasn't also killed as he was 22 years old at the time. Perhaps he offered no resistance. Other men and older boys were killed.

The women and children of these and other victims of this massacre were taken prisoners. Leaving the dead where they were slain, the Indians began marching their prisoners back to their camp. On the way to Oldstown, in Ohio, these women and children who were unable to keep up were killed. The first born child of Margaret (See) Roach, a boy, was killed in a most brutal fashion after being snatched from her breast.

Accounts related by James Olson, also told by a descendant, was that Frederick See's children held up for two to three days. The smallest, John, was quite weak and Catherine feared for his life. Seeing a warrior riding their horse, Catherine indicated to him that she wanted it. When he refused, she picked up a club and attempted to knock him off the horse.

About to kill her, the amused Indians prevented the warrior from doing so, calling her a "fighting squaw." Once they reached the Indian campgrounds in what is now Ross County, Ohio, it is said the Shawnee had a celebration. The women were forced to sing for them, and Catherine was called upon to run the gauntlet. Grabbing a stick she began making whirling moves swinging the stick which pleased all the warriors greatly. Captives now for several months, soon cold weather was upon them.

There was not enough room inside for all the prisoners, and was crowded by old Indian squaws they shared a tent with. A child of Catherine's, a son, had to sleep outside with the dogs to keep warm. One day the warriors went off hunting leaving Catherine in charge of all the old Indian squaws sitting around the campfire. One had a fainting spell, falling into the fire. Catherine let her fall, thus making room for her children in the tent, a bravery which helped her family to survive, intact.

Catharine See and her children were taken to Old Town and kept there by the Shawnees until there was a treaty and an exchange of prisoners about a year later. A document written by Colonel Henry Bouquet to William Penn, Governor of Pennsylvania, on November 15, 1764, stated all Indian tribes led by Chief Cornstalk had at last agreed to release the prisoners, not only from the incident at the See home but a number of other similar incidents at other family homes on the South Branch.

Catherine and at least some of her children must have been separated during their captivity, because her youngest child, John, was adopted by an Indian family who had lost their son. The couple repeatedly told John that he would be burned alive if retaken by the whites. John became very fond of his new Indian parents, and the year with the Shawnees apparently did much to erase from his mind the memory of his natural family and his former life.

When the time arrived for the Indians to release their prisoners, all of the See family except the twin, nine-year-old Elizabeth, were freed. Cornstalk would not agree to let her go, but kept her for nine more years during which time his young son took her as his squaw and, according to family tradition, she had an Indian child by him. Later she escaped or was ransomed, because she eventually left the Indians, and married a white man named Peter Shoemaker.

After being released from the Indians the party traveled about nine miles before darkness overtook them, and made camp for the night. Young John made his bed between two of his sisters, but he did not sleep. He lay awaken until he was certain everyone else was asleep, then crept out of camp and hurried back to his adopted Indian family.

Here he stayed for some time. One version indicates one year, while another says four years. Eventually his uncle, Michael Adam See ( brother of Frederick Michael and husband of Barbara Rebecca Harness). ransomed his nephew John and took him back to Hampshire County, Virginia where the rest of the See family was then living.

NOTE: The return prisoner list included Catherine See and her children Michael, George, John, Mary, Margaret and Lois...along with Margaret, George, Elizabeth and Sally Yocum (Yoakum).

Frederick See's widow is believed to have later remarried a man named John Hardy, a Hardy County pioneer.

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VAN BIBBER & DAVIS FAMILIES

This summary file was written by Mike Shaver - Summer 1998 following Crye genealogical gatherings in La Cross, Wisconsin.

Family legend and records from the family Bible of Richard and Edney Davis tell of Willaim Davis being captured by indians when he was a small boy. His parents were allegedly killed and he was taken by the indians to live in a Shawnee village on the Sandusky Plains (Ohio?). It is also recorded that he witnessed his uncle being tied to a tree and burned to death. Researcher Judy Hopkins believes that the incident could have been the "Massacre at Muddy Creek" in 1763 in the vicinity of what is now Monroe County, West Viginia. William was subsequently adopted by an indian woman who had lost a child about his own age. He reportedly lived with the Shawnee until his early twenties when he learned that he had a brother still living and went to find him in the "White Man's Settlement". His brother was not present when he arrived but the settlers, knowing the story of his capture, tricked him into staying by having another man impersonate his brother temporarily. The following day when his real brother arrived, William denounced all white men as liars and decievers and returned to the indians. But at a later date he reportedly returned to his brother's cabin where he stayed. Family lore handed down over the years recounts numerous versions of how William's indian step mother would often leave token gifts for him at the edge of the woods near his cabin - but would never venture up to his dwelling.


In a Court Order Book dated 11 March, 1777 from Greenbrier/Botetourt Co. Virginia: The Commonwealth versus Willaim Davis and John VanBibber. The defendants were arraigned for Disloyalty. VanBibber's case was dismissed, but Davis was held bound to the Court, because he knew how to make gun powder and had signified his intention of going back among the indians with whom he had lived for twenty years. As a result he was not allowed to leave The Commonwealth for one year. Reference to this case is also found in a book called "Kegley's Virginia Frontier".


The Bible record of Edney Thomas Davis states that William married Mary (Molly) Packwood in 1777, but there is no official record to confirm this since all marriage records in that area prior to 1780 were destroyed or obliterated. Molly's parents are unknown but it is believed that she was related to the Packwoods of Patrick County, Viginia. William is listed as a member of the Greenbrier Baptist Church and is recorded as having been recieved as a member "by experience" in 1803.


William was subsequently very active in the affairs of Greenbrier and that part which would eventually become Monroe County, W/VA. He is mentioned often in county records with other early settlers such as George Dixon, the VanBibbers, and the Ellisons. John VanBibber built a powder mill where William apparently learned to make gun powder. The VanBibbers and the Dixons were also involved in the founding of Point Pleasant on the Ohio River, but there is no record of William's participation in this venture. He is identified as the owner of 108 acres near the Greenbrier River in 1781 by the Index of West Virginia Land Grants. On 1 May 1794 it is recorded that William and Mary Davis were involved with Frederick and Clara Stoner in the sale of land totaling 318 acres to James Graham. Clearly many of the records of his land dealings have been lost since he disposed of considerably more acreage in his will.


Records of Greenbrier County list William Davis as a "taxable resident" from 1786 to 1792. He is listed on the personal property tax list of Monroe County from 1799 (when it was formed from part of Greenbrier County) until 1815. Following his name listing on each annual record is the name "Richard Davis" and this is believed to be his brother since they appear to be contemporaries in age and also shared adjoining parcels of land on the Greenbrier River. Mary Davis and her son Jacob are listed on the 1815 Tax List but conspicuously absent is the name of William who is presumed to have died during this period.


In his will dated 28 Feb., 1815 William requested that he "be buried in a neat Christian manner and that all his lawful debts be discharged". He left half of his land to his wife Mary and the other half to his daughter Editha. To his son Jacob he gave his rifle and all his working tools. Witnesses included Harry Perry, James Perry and Isaac Busby.



Children of WILLIAM DAVIS and MARY PACKWOOD are:


2. i. JACOB2 DAVIS, b. Abt. 1780, Greenbrier/Monroe Co., West Virginia; d. Bef. 1850, Madison Co., Indiana.

ii. EDITHA DAVIS, b. Abt. 1785, Greenbrier/Monroe County, West Virgina.

3. iii. RACHEL DAVIS, b. Abt. 1790, Greenbrier County, West Virginia; d. 1812, Monroe Co., Virginia.

JACOB DAVIS: 2ND. GENERATION

JACOB2 DAVIS (WILLIAM1)3,4 was born Abt. 1780 in Greenbrier/Monroe Co., West Virginia, and died Bef. 1850 in Madison Co., Indiana. He married EUNICE O. DIXON5 January 25, 1806 in Monroe County, West Virginia6, daughter of GEORGE DIXON and VERONICA VANBIBBER.

Notes for JACOB DAVIS:

1806 - Coincident with his marriage there, Jacob Davis was received into the Old Greenbrier First Baptist Church.

1810- In the census for that year Jacob is recorded as living with his wife and 3 sons on land adjoining that of his father William and uncle Richard Davis. He remained here just after the death his father in 1815. At this time he sold all his land and departed the area enroute to Indiana.

Obituary of William T. Davis (son of Jacob) stated that Jacob, with his family, floated down the Ohio River on a flatboat to Cinncinnati, Ohio in the spring of 1815. Their boat was loaded with salt and whetstones (a much prized and valuable commodity at the time). That same year they continued down the river to the town of Madison, Indiana where they landed and made their first home about four miles below Paris in a portion of Jefferson County, Indiana which later became Jennings County. In 1816 William recieved land patent to 360 acres (two parcels) located nea the Graham Fork of the Muscatuck River in Jefferson County. After this they lived 5 years on what is known as Hester Island. Then they moved to Azelia in Bartholomew County. (From Banner Plain Dealer, North Vernon, Jennings Co. Indiana].

1820 - Census of that year enumerates Jacob and his family (w/mother Mary) in Delaware County (later became Bartholomew Co.). He also purchased land near Azelia area, T8, R 6, Sect. 35. William Packwood (possibly his maternal grandfather or an uncle) bought land the same day, Aug. 20th 1820, right next door. (NOTE: There were several other brothers of William Packwood who settled in this same area).

1830 - Jacob and family still listed as residents of Bartholomew County now living with 10 children.

1834 - Jacob sold land in Bartholmew Co. and that same year bought land on the Grant/Madison Co. line. He is identified in the histories of both counties as a prominent early settler. He resided in Fairmount Township and the history of that community includes various references to Jacob Davis including an incident in which he helped pursue and kill a record size bear.

1837 - Jacob sold his land in Fairmount to his son Joseph and moved to the Town of Summit where they purchased and lived on a small lot. He is recorded still living here during the 1840 census but apparently died before 1850 when he is absent from that count. In the period following his death (between 1850 and 1860) many members of his family who had previously resided in the counties south of Indianapolis apparently sold out and departed, some to Iowa, some to Wisconsin and others to parts unknown.

Marriage Notes for JACOB DAVIS and EUNICE DIXON:

All information related to the children of Jacob Davis and Eunice Dixon provided form the records of Judy Hopkins of Boise, Idaho on 8/22/98.

All information related to the children of Jacob Davis and Eunice Dixon provided form the records of Judy Hopkins of Boise, Idaho on 8/22/98.


Children of JACOB DAVIS and EUNICE DIXON are:

4. i. WILLIAM T.3 DAVIS, b. 1806, Union, Monroe Co., West Virginia; d. September 13, 1893, Brewersville, Jennings Co., Indiana.

5. ii. JAMES WARD DAVIS, b. May 30, 1808, Greenbrier/Monroe Co., West Virginia; d. December 19, 1882, Plumb Hollow, Freemont, Iowa.

6. iii. RICHARD DAVIS, b. 1809, Greenbrier/Monroe Co., West Virginia; d. March 06, 1894, Clackamas Co., Oregon.

iv. JACOB DAVIS, b. Abt. 1810, Greenbrier/Monroe Co., West Virginia.



v. THOMAS DAVIS, b. Abt. 1811, Greenbrieer/Monroe Co., West Virginia.



vi. JOHN D. DAVIS, b. Abt. 1813, Greenbrier/Monroe Co., West Virginia.



7. vii.EDITH DAVIS, b. 1814, Greenbrier/Monroe County, West Virgina; d. Abt. 1890, Stanton, Dunn Co., Wisconsin.

8. viii. JOSEPH DAVIS, b. May 01, 1818, Indiana; d. October 01, 1855, Jennings County, Indiana.

ix. UNK1 DAVIS.



x. UNK2 DAVIS.



9. xi. PERMILIA DAVIS, b. February 16, 1820, Indana; d. Abt. 1900, Saltfork, Grant County, Oklahoma.

xii. ANDREW J. DAVIS, b. June 08, 1823, Azelia, Bartholomew County, Indiana; d. March 09, 1913, Natoma, Osborne County, Kansas; m. ABIGAIL MAPES, January 24, 1841, Jennings County, Indiana.

Notes for ANDREW J. DAVIS:

There is no substantiated direct documentation establishing the paternity of Andrew Davis. However, descendant Judy Hopkins has concluded that he was the son of Jacob and Eunice Davis on the basis of substantial and convincing circumstantial evidence.

Andrew served honorably in the Union Army as a Private during the Civil War. He enlisted at Fontanelle, Iowa in a Company commanded by Capt. L. H. Calan, in the 4th Cavalry Regiment of the Iowa Volunteers on 21 Dec., 1863. The Regiment was commanded by Colonel Winslow. Andrew was honorably discharged for disability at Davenport Iowa on 22 August, 1865. He sustained an injury to his spinal chord that disabled him from performing and bodily labor for the remainder of his life.
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Introduction Page 1

-1763 Indians come up Kanawha in large body of 60 killed Frederick See and Felty Yokum

History of Augusta County, Virginia p138

and took their families prisoner with many others.

(Narrative of John Stuart 1798 in WMQ Vol 22 No 4 Apr 1914)

The massacre on Muddy Creek in 1763 completely destroyed one of Greenbriars' first settlements. A stone marker in a field on a hill marks the site of the massacre. Frederick See's name, spelled "Sea" is listed. The graves of the victims may still be seen in what is known as the McKee burying ground. In 1772 a lone man, Samuel McKinney, built his cabin near this tragic spot. Others soon followed and two years later there were enough settlers to warrant the building of Fort Arbuckle on Muddy Creek for their protection.

After the massacre at Muddy Creek “they (the Indians under Cornstalk) proceeded to the Big Levels, and on the next day, after having been as hospitably entertained as at Muddy Creek, they reenacted the revolting scenes of the previous day. Every white man in the settlement but Conrad Yolkom, who was some distance from his house, was slain, and every woman but Mrs. Glendinin. Yolkom, when alarmed by the outcries of the women, took in the situation and fled to Jackson's River telling the story.

The people were unwilling to believe him, till convinced by the approach of the Indians. All fled before them, and they pursued on to Carr's Creek in Rockbridge, where many families were murdered and others captured.”

History of Augusta County, Virginia p138

After the massacre at Muddy Creek “they (the Indians under Cornstalk) proceeded to the Big Levels, and on the next day, after having been as hospitably entertained as at Muddy Creek, they reenacted the revolting scenes of the previous day. Every white man in the settlement but Conrad Yolkom, who was some distance from his house, was slain, and every woman but Mrs. Glendenin. Yolkom, when alarmed by the outcries of the women, took in the situation and fled to Jackson's River telling the story. The people were unwilling to believe him, till convinced by the approach of the Indians.

All fled before them, and they pursued on to Carr's Creek in Rockbridge, where many families were murdered and others captured.”

-1763 Indians come up Kanawha in large body of 60 killed Frederick See and Felty Yokum and took their families prisoner with many others

(Narrative of John Stuart 1798 in WMQ Vol 22 No 4 Apr 1914)

The massacre on Muddy Creek in 1763 completely destroyed one of Greenbriars' first settlements. A stone marker in a field on a hill marks the site of the massacre. Frederick See's name, spelled "Sea" is listed. The graves of the victims may still be seen in what is known as the McKee burying ground.

In 1772 a lone man, Samuel McKinney, built his cabin near this tragic spot. Others soon followed and two years later there were enough settlers to warrant the building of Fort Arbuckle on Muddy Creek for their protection.

1764 - 1765 Sarah, Michael, George, Mary, Catherine, Margaret and John See returned from captivity among Indians to British forces under Col. Bouquet 

Greenbrier captives John, Mary, 7, Peggy, 19,  Michael, Sally, 10,  Catherine, George See with Elizabeth, George, Margaret and Sally Yokum

Nov 30, 1764; Military Papers of Colonel Henry BOUQUET in letters to General Thomas GAGE, dated from Fort PITT, November 30, 1764; Published in "Western Pennsylvania Historical  Magazine", Volume 39 (1956), pages 187-203; article entitled:  "Indian Captives Released by Colonel BOUQUET", by 

William S. EWING, curator of Manuscripts at that time at the Clements Library,  University of Michigan returned 1765 to Bouguet by Shawnee taken 1763.

At the end of The French and Indian War, as a condition of peace with the Ohio Indians, BOUQUET demanded the  release of prisoners held by the Delaware, Shawnee, and Muncie Indians.  By the Articles of Agreement concluded  in November 1764, the chieftans of these nations agreed to cease hostilities against all British subjects; to collect and deliver to BOUQUET's forces, all English  prisoners, deserters, 

Frenchmen, Negroes, and any othe White people living among them; and finally to appoint deputies from each Indian tribe authorized to treat for peace for their respective nations with Sir William JOHNSON, 

Crown Super-intendent of Indian Affairs in the Northern Department. BOUQUET was successful in bringing about the release  of about 200 prisoners.  These prisoners were delivered to him upon several different occassions from the different Indian Nations.  Among the lists we find the  following dates and names:

List D  

Inclosed in BOUQUET to GAGE, November 30, 1764, GAGE Papers, CLEMENTS Library, 

University of Michigan:   List of Captives taken by Indians in AUGUSTA County,  Virginia (later 

GREENBRIER) going home under the Care of Col. McNEILL, Volunteers, with a Return of the    Necessaries delivered to them at Muskingum & Ft. PITT:

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males:

#3.  Geo: YOKEHAM  1 shirt, 1 leggins, 1 shoe pack

#6.  Michael SEE   2 shirts, 1 blanket

#7.  George SEE    1 shirt, 1 leggins, 1 shoe pack

females:

#15. Margar't YOKEHAM  1 legins, 1 shoe pack, 1 blanket

#20. Mary SEE          2 shirts, 1 leggins, 1 shoe  pack, 1 blanket, 1 pair of shoes

      #21. Catherine SEE     1 shirt, 1 shoe pack

Fort Pitt  Dec'r. ye 1st 1764  Received of Col BOUQUET  .(signed) John McNEILL  Indorsed:  Return of Captives & Necessaries going to Augusta County under the Care of Col McNeill's Voluntiers  Dec'r ye 1, 1764                            

List E  British Museum. Additional Manuscripts. 21655,f.249.  List of Prisoners going to Fort PITT under the Command of Capt'n LEWIS   Nov. ye 15, 1764.

      males:

#16.  Michael SEE

#17.  George SEE

females:

#23.  Margaret YOKEHAM

#28.  Mary SEE

Camp at Muskingum Nov'r ye 15- 1764      Received from Capt'n LEWIS Ourry, A.D.Q.M.G. the above  Sixty Captives, which I am to deliver to the Commanding  Officer at Fort Pitt having Signed two Receipts of this same Tenor & date   CHA's LEWIS  (Endorsed)  List of Prisoners Sent by Captain LEWIS                  to Fort Pitt the 15'th November 1764.                          

LIST F   Inclosed in BOUQUET to GAGE, March 4, 1765, GAGE  Papers, CLEMENTS Library, 

University of Michigan.  List of Prisoner's delivered up by the Shawanese  Indians at Mackwayack and arrived at Fort Pitt 5'th   January 1765.

      #5.  Elizabeth YOAKIM, 12 years old; taken July 1763 from Green Bryar  AUGUSTA County.

LIST G  Inclosed in CROGHAN to GAGE, May 12, 1765, GAGE Papers,  CLEMENTS Library, University of Michigan.  List of the Prisoners delived'd up by te Shawanese  Nation of Indians at Fort Pitt the 10th May 1765.

      (males)

#11.  John SEA, age 7, taken at Catapin, Virginia; 

          a prisoner for 7 years

                        List G (continued)

     Women Deliver'd 10'th May 1765 by the Shawanese.

#2.   Peggy SEA, age 19, taken from Green Bryer, 

            Virginia, a prisoner of 2 years.

      #12.  Sally SEA, age 10, taken from Green Bryer,

            Virginia, a prisoner of 2 years.

      #19.  Jean CLANDINNON, age 5, taken from Green Bryer,

            Virginia, a prisoner of 2 years.

      #20.   Sally YOKUM, age 5, taken from Green Bryer,

Virginia, a prisoner of 2 years.

      #21.  Mary SEA, age 7, taken from Green Bryer,

            Virginia, a prisoner of 2 years.

General State of the prisoners deliver'd at Fort Pitt  0'th May 1765

Indorsed:  List of the prisoners Delivered up the Shawanese Indians at Fort Pitt 10 May 1765  NOTE:  A complete list of prisoners may now be found on  the internet at http://ps.superb.net/malec/bouquet.htm

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