Summary

Conflict Period:
World War II 1
Branch:
Army Air Forces 1
Rank:
General 1
Birth:
Alameda, California 1
Death:
27 Sep 1993 2
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Pictures & Records (23)

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DoolittleandmenChina.jpg
DoolittleandmenChina.jpg
Source: http://www.history.navy.mil/photos/images/h97000/h97502.jpg
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World War II Congressional Medal of Honor Recipient James Harold ("Jimmy") Doolittle 1925 - Following the raid on Tokyo.
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On 18 April 1942, Airmen Of The Us Army Air Forces, Led By Lt. Colonel James (Jimmy) H. Doolittle, Carried The Battle Of The Pacific To The Heart Of The Japanese Empire With A Surprising And Daring Raid On Military Targets At Tokyo, Yokohama, Yokosuka, Na
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On 18 April 1942, Airmen Of The U.S. Army Air Forces, Led By Lt. Colonel James H. (Jimmy) Doolittle, Carried The Battle Of The Pacific To The Heart Of The Japanese Empire With A Surprising And Daring Raid On Military Targets At Tokyo, Yokohama, Yokosuka,
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On 18 April 1942, Airmen Of The U.S. Army Air Forces, Led By Lt. Colonel James H. (Jimmy) Doolittle, Carried The Battle Of The Pacific To The Heart Of The Japanese Empire With A Surprising And Daring Raid On Military Targets At Tokyo, Yokohama, Yokosuka,
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Orders In Hand, Capt. Marc A. Mitscher, Usn, Skipper Of The Uss Hornet, Chats With Major General (Then Lt. Colonel) James H. (Jimmy) Doolittle, Usa (Left), Before Pinning A Japanese Medal To A 500-Pound Bomb Headed For Tokyo. More Than A Score Of The 80
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The Insignia On One Of The North American B-25'S Which Took Off From The Uss Hornet To Drop Bombs On Tokyo And Other Japansese Industrial Centers. In April, 1942, The United States And The World At Large Was Electrified By An Announcement By President R
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Tokyo Raid - On April 18, 1942, Airmen Of The U.S. Army Air Forces, Led By Lt. Colonel James H. (Jimmy) Doolittle, Carried The Battle Of The Pacific To The Heart Of The Japanese Empire With A Surprising And Daring Raid On Military Targets At Tokyo, Yokoha
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Usaf - Tokyo Raid - On 18 April 1942, Airmen Of The Us Army Air Forces, Led By Lt. Colonel James H.(Jimmy) Doolittle, Carried The Battle Of The Pacific To The Heart Of The Japanese Empire With A Surprising And Daring Raid On Military Targets At Tokyo, Yok
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Usaf - Tokyo Raid - On 18 April 1942, Airmen Of The Us Army Air Forces, Led By Lt. Colonel James H.(Jimmy) Doolittle, Carried The Battle Of The Pacific To The Heart Of The Japanese Empire With A Surprising And Daring Raid On Military Targets At Tokyo, Yok
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Usaf - Tokyo Raid - On 18 April 1942, Airmen Of The Us Army Air Forces, Led By Lt. Colonel James H.(Jimmy) Doolittle, Carried The Battle Of The Pacific To The Heart Of The Japanese Empire With A Surprising And Daring Raid On Military Targets At Tokyo, Yok
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Twelve Of The U.S. Army B-25 Medium Bombers Rear Off For Japan After Taking Off From The Uss Hornet, April 18, 1942. The Smaller Specks In The Sky Are U.S. Navy Planes Which Took Part In The First Phase Of The Operation. In April, 1942, The United States
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Brig. Gen. Howard M. Turner, Gen. Carl A. Spaatz And Lt. General James H. Doolittle Discuss 8Th Air Force Operations During The Latter'S Visit To Hdq., 1St Bomb Division, Based In England On 31 March 1945.
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Lt. General James H. Doolittle And Other Members Of The 8Th Air Force In England, Examine A .50 Calibre Machine Gun.
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Mr. Henry L. Stimson, Secretary Of War, And Major General James H. Doolittle Discuss World War Ii At A Base Somewhere In North Africa.
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Major General James H. Doolittle Awards The Distinguished Flying Cross To An Officer Of The 90Th Photo Reconnaissance Wing During A Ceremony At An Air Base Somewhere In Italy.
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Investigating Party A Graves Of Aaf Airmen (Members Of Doolittle Tokyo Bombing Episode) Who Killed At Jap Internment Camp Near Kiangwan Airdrome, Shanghai, China (Photo Taken 17 Dec 1945.)
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World War II War Diary page describing the transport and takeoff for the Doolittle Raid. Navy folks don't seem to respect the flying skills for the Army Air Force pilots.
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Raid over Tokyo.gif
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Personal Details

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Full Name:
James Harold Doolittle 2
Also known as:
Jimmy 2
Full Name:
James H Doolittle 3
Birth:
Alameda, California 2
Male 2
Birth:
14 Dec 1896 3
Death:
27 Sep 1993 3
Burial:
Burial Place: Arlington National Cemetery, Washington, DC 2
Residence:
Last Residence: Pebble Beach, CA 3
Edit
Marriage:
Josephine Daniels Doolittle 2
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World War II 1

Branch:
Army Air Forces 1
Rank:
General 1
Service Start Date:
1917 1
Service End Date:
1959 1
Edit
Occupation:
Military General and Fighter Pilot 2
Medal of Honor:
Date awarded: 09 Jun 1942 4
Organization: U.S. Army, Air Corps 4
Place of action: Japan 4
Rank: Brigadier, General 4
Retired from the Military:
10 May 1946 2
Commanded 8th Air Force in Europe and the Pacific:
January 1944 to September 1945 4
Commanded North African Strategic Air Forces:
March 1943 4
Commanded the 12th Air Force, North Africa:
September 1942 4
Led first carrier-based bomber attack on Japan:
18 Apr 1942 4
Promoted to Brigadier General:
1942 4
World War I:
spent the war as a flight instructor in the United States 4
WWI-enlisted as flying cadet in Army Signal Corps:
October 1917 4
“Doolittle’s Raid” or “30 Seconds over Tokyo”:
Japan 4
Social Security:
Social Security Number: ***-**-4510 3

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Medal of Honor Citation

Japan

For conspicuous leadership above the call of duty, involving personal valor and intrepidity at an extreme hazard to life. With the apparent certainty of being forced to land in enemy territory or to perish at sea, Gen. Doolittle personally led a squadron of Army bombers, manned by volunteer crews, in a highly destructive raid on the Japanese mainland.

“Doolittle’s Raid”

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Lt. Colonel Jimmy Doolittle personally led the first U.S. air strike against the Japanese mainland in World War II. The “Thirty seconds over Tokyo” boosted American morale after the crushing defeat at Pearl Harbor and proved to the Japanese that their homeland, like ours, was not invulnerable to attack. On April 18, 1942, Doolittle took off from the deck of the Navy carrier ship Hornet with sixteen B-25 medium bombers. Personally leading the force of B-25s, Doolittle faced not only the challenge of getting his men close enough to Japan to successfully bomb their targets, but also the basic goal of making a plane light enough to take off from a Navy carrier ship. Doolittle knew it was possible, and by the time his men shipped out, the planes could successfully take off from the short carrier ship’s deck.

When the men set sail for Japan, they planned to take flight for their mission once the ship was 450 miles from the coast, but the Navy carrier ship was discovered by an enemy shipping boat 200 extra miles from the take-off point. Doolittle had to decide whether or not his men should take off this far from the target or push the airplanes into the ocean. Either way the deck of the Hornet had to be cleared in order for the ship to defend itself against the oncoming enemy fighters. Doolittle’s group took off for their targets, dumping everything they could spare in order to carry more fuel. The men reached their targets and bombed five Japanese strongholds, including Tokyo. Not one plane was lost in the air raid, fifteen headed for China and one for Russia. Because the men had to take off earlier than expected, most did not have the fuel to reach their destinations in China. Three men died bailing out over the ocean, four men were seriously injured bailing out over land, eight men were captured by the Japanese, three of those eight were later executed and one died of malnutrition, while the other four were recovered from prison camps after the war. As for the four who landed in Russia, they were interned but later released. The rest of Doolittle’s men, including himself, made it to China and survived their landings.

Initially Doolittle thought the air raid was a failure because America lost all the airplanes, but the boost “Doolittle’s Raid” gave American morale made this mission a success. America showed the world that it would strike back and that it could strike back against the enemies who wished to attack American soil.

 

Source: http://www.doolittletokyoraiders.com/doolittle_raid.htm

"The first lesson is that you can't lose a war if you have command of the air, and you can't win a war if you haven't."--Jimmy Doolittle

Doolittle Raiders as written by LTC Mike Assid

Colo. Springs, Colo.

Jimmy Doolittle, the Doolittle Tokyo Raiders;

310thBG, Doolittle Raiders

     Blue Squadron and Friends, ........Sat, 18 Apr 2009 (To the 57th Bomb Wing)
67 years ago - approximately four hours from now - Reserve Lt Col Jimmy Doolittle launched from the deck of the USS Hornet at the controls of a heavily modified B-25B Mitchell medium bomber. The deck crew and command staff of the Hornet and the remaining Raiders looked on with some trepidation, as it was literally a “do or die” moment for the legendary aviator and the entire strike force. As Ted Lawson would later write, “If he (Doolittle) couldn’t do it, we couldn’t do it.” But, Lt Col Doolittle could…and very soon, so would they all.
Four aircraft back, the 380th’s future commander, Lt Rod “Hoss” Wilder, sat in the co-pilot’s seat of #02283. Also on board this B-25 was another future member of the 380th, Lt Denver Truelove, navigator. Eight more aircraft toward the fantail sat #12, “Fickle Finger”, tail #02278, with Lt Bill Bower at the controls. Most of you have met Col (ret) Bower at our reactivation or at the annual 310th banquet two weeks back. Lt Bower would, as a Major, go on to command our sister squadron, the 428th, and later the (then) 310th Bomb Group. Further back and barely on the deck of the Hornet (her entire tail aft of the main gear hanging out over the Pacific) sat aircraft #15, “TNT”, tail #02267, with the 380th’s future Squadron Navigator, Lt Howard Sessler, ready to toggle off his bombs over targets in Nagoya. Most of you know that the B-25 at WestPac Restorations (just across the flight line from us at Pete Field) flew off the deck of the Constellation painted as #02267 for the movie, Pearl Harbor, in a reenactment of the Doolittle Raid. Our good friend and supporter, Bill Klaers, was at the controls (Bill has flown his B-25 off aircraft carriers five times now…no other pilot in history has this in his log book).
The Raiders – all volunteers – launched approximately ten hours earlier than planned after a Japanese picket boat detected their task force and radioed a warning to Tokyo. They knew they wouldn’t have the fuel to reach their recovery bases in China, but they went anyway. They’d spent weeks in training for short takeoffs at Eglin Field in Florida, but none had actually flown a B-25 off the pitching deck of a carrier until that day. There were so many “ifs” and “unknowns” that morning six-decades-and-change ago that it’s hard for us, today, to fully appreciate the enormity of the task and the epic courage of the men who set themselves to it.
Of the Raid, much has been written. Not nearly so much of where Doolittle and his men went afterward. You can, however, find almost all of them by researching the major B-25 outfits in the Pacific in Europe…such as the 57th Bomb Wing and, specifically, the 310th Bomb Group, where about a dozen of the Raiders wound up (and where they held their first reunion, on the second storey of the 310th HQ building in North Africa, in 1943). To a man, they continued to fight till the very end of the conflict, though some would end up as POWs or be killed in action before V-J Day.
War is a terrible thing – though it is not the most terrible of things – and much of what we think of as America’s national character was defined in WWII. The Doolittle Raid, itself, is a hallmark moment in our Nation’s history – on par with the surrender of British forces at Yorktown or the flag raising on Mount Suribachi – where Americans showed ingenuity, physical and moral courage, and perseverance against all the evidence that pointed to the endeavor as a disaster in the making. But fortune, as always, favors the bold, and America could not, and never will, back down from a fight with a tyrant and/or an aggressor…and will do everything in its power to take the fight to their doorstep.
We in the 380th have inherited a legacy of valor unmatched by any other squadron in our Wing, and it is imperative that we continue to honor that heritage in everything we do. Eisenhower once said, “…the Nation that forgets its heritage is unworthy of it.” This will never be an issue in Blue Squadron. From the deck of the Hornet, to the skies of North Africa, the Mediterranean and Southern and Eastern Europe and through the long years of the Cold War, the 380th has fought to secure our Four Essential Freedoms. We continue to do so today, and ever shall.
But…it all began many years ago with an impossible mission. On that day – this day – 18 April, 1942.
Blue Team, for those of you not standing a turn of the watch in the Middle East, I hope you will have an enjoyable weekend with your families. But for all of you, when you have some time today, take a moment to drink a toast to Jimmy Doolittle, his Raiders, and the men with whom they fought in the second World War (and later, for many, in the Cold War). In honoring them, we honor ourselves: as Americans, as Airmen, and as their direct descendents…for we in the 310th and 380th wear their colors today.

  Take care. And, as always, thank you all for your service to our Nation.
Very Respectfully, Mike “Drop” Assid, Lt Col, USAF

http://57thbombwing.com/gallery2/main.php?g2_itemId=36 

( Placed by Barbi Ennis Connolly, 57th Bomb Wing Historical Researcher and Historian for 2 Groups.)

Jimmy Doolittle

Columbia AAB S.C.

"JIMMY" 

“The First Joint Action” is an account of the first bombing raid on Tokyo, Japan on April 18, 1942. The Army Air Force complement was commanded by Lt. Col. James H. Doolittle and the Naval complement was commanded by Vice Admiral William F. Halsey who was also the task force commander.

http://doolittleraider.com/first_joint_action.htm#_Toc510516192

A commander was necessary for the Air Force element of this project. Lt. Colonel J. H. Doolittle, who had recently returned to active duty with the Air Forces, was selected to do this job.  It was explained to the Commanding Officer of the 17th Bombardment Group, Lt. Colonel W. C. Mills, that this was to be a mission that would be extremely hazardous and would require a high degree of skill and would be of great value to our defense effort. 

Please click on the Official Raider link above and read this entire Historic story!

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