Summary

Conflict Period:
Civil War (Union) 1
Branch:
Army 1
Rank:
Brigadier General 1
Birth:
10 Aug 1837 1
Hudson, Ohio 1
Death:
12 May 1904 1
Cincinnati, Ohio 1
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Personal Details

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Full Name:
Andrew Hickenlooper 1
Birth:
10 Aug 1837 1
Hudson, Ohio 1
Death:
12 May 1904 1
Cincinnati, Ohio 1
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Civil War (Union) 1

Branch:
Army 1
Rank:
Brigadier General 1

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Stories

 Exhibiting adaptability and skill in constructing trenches and mines to counter Confederate resistance, Captain Andrew Hickenlooper, chief engineer of the Seventeenth Army Corps under Union General John Logan, had an integral role in shaping the Union course of events at the siege of Vicksburg in the spring and summer months of 1863 by overseeing one of three efforts in constructing an approach to seize the city along Jackson Road—a path that led directly to the garrison Union soldiers called Fort Hill.  On June 21, as Hickenlooper’s engineers and assisting infantrymen became hampered in their trench building efforts to sequester Fort Hill because Confederate General John Pemberton’s forces were “using hand-grenades (6 and 12 pound shells) with effect,” Hickenlooper demonstrated his leadership, his reliance on the precision of his engineers, and the importance of the engineers’ capabilities in impacting Vicksburg’s outcome by ordering mining operations to begin.  The engineers and miners, afraid, however, after Hickenlooper left the battlefield temporarily, abandoned their work on June 25 amidst mine explosions detonated by the Confederate army.  Even with this strong leadership, Hickenlooper attempts to disregard his absence in his officer report, demonstrating his ulterior motive of portraying his actions in a positive manner, which illustrates that defeating the enemy was not the sole objective of those involved in the war.  Despite this setback, the mining operation was effective in the Union army’s infiltration of the fort, as “1,500 pounds of powder in three different branch mines (500 in each) and 700 pounds in [the] center” were used so that Union “troops rushed in and took possession of [the] crater,” which was 40 feet wide and 12 feet deep, shaped like a saucer in the side of the fort.  As the fighting continued throughout the following days, Hickenlooper placed two guns in the crater and ordered for another mining operation to proceed on July 1, which was a “perfect success, blowing some 7 or 8 rebels.”  Indeed, the efforts by Hickenlooper and his fellow engineers significantly contributed to the strategy of the Union army and the surrender of the Confederate army at Vicksburg on July 4 to General Grant.

Name: Andrew Hickenlooper Brigadier-General United States Volunteers, was born, of mixed German and Irish ancestry, at Hudson, Ohio, August 30th, 1836. In 1846 the family removed to Cincinnati, where Andrew ended his school education at old Woodward, afterward entered the counting-room of the Weekly Despatch; was then for a time in an insurance office; and at the age of seventeen entered the City Civil Engineer's office as rodman. In 1857 he received the appointment of City Surveyor, which office he held at the outbreak of the war. He recruited an artillery company, originally known as Hickenlooper's Cincinnati Battery, which first saw service under Fremont at Jefferson City. On March, 1862, the battery was transferred to General Grant's army at Pittsburgh Landing, and did such excellent service there that three days after the battle its commander was promoted to division commander of artillery. He served in this capacity until after the battles of Iuka and Corinth, when he was especially honored in the official report of the latter battle, and on the 26th of October ordered by General Grant to report for staff duty to General McPherson. He was at first made Chief of Ordnance and Artillery, and then in February, when about to start down to Vickshurg, he was made Chief Engineer of the 17th Army Corps. In the siege of Vicksburg he conducted the siege operations in front of the corps with such signal ability as to win the warmest approval from McPherson himself, whose own abilities as an engineer were of the highest order. He wrote of him as exhibiting "untiring energy and skill in conducting reconnoissances, making maps of the route passed over, and superintending the repairs and construction of bridges, etc., and exposing himself constantly night and day." In this siege the first mine that was made and exploded under the enemy's works was made under Hickenlooper's directions. After the fall of Vicksburg the "Board of Honor" of the 17th Corps awarded him the gold medal with the inscription, "Pittsburgh Landing, Siege of Corinth, Iuka, Corinth, Port Gibson, Raymond, Jackson, Champion Hills, Vicksburg." When McPherson took command of the Army of the Tennessee he was made Judge Advocate on his staff, and a little later Chief of Artillery for the Department and Army of the Tennessee. In this position he accompanied his chief through the Atlanta campaign. After the death of McPherson he returned to his duties as Judge Advocate, and a little later accepted the position of Assistant Inspector-General of the 17th Army Corps, which carried with it the rank of Lieutenant-Colonel. In the spring of 1865 he was brevetted Brigadier-General of Volunteers, and assigned to the command of the oldest brigade in the Army of the Tennessee, composed of the 11th, 13th, 15th and 16th Iowa Veteran Volunteers, with which he served until the close of the war, when he returned to Cincinnati and formed a partnership with R. C. Philips, civil engineer. In the following year he was appointed United States Marshal for the Southern District of Ohio. Generals Grant, Sherman, Howard, Logan, Leggett and Belknap, when his application was made for this office, gave the very highest of testimonials; Leggett said, "McPherson regarded him as his model officer;" while Howard wrote, "As a military engineer I never knew his equal." In January, 1871, he resigned the office of Marshal, and in May was appointed City Civil Engineer; served one term, was unanimously re-elected for a second, but shortly resigned to accept the Vice-Presidency of the Cincinnati Gas Light & Coke Company. The career of General Hickenlooper has been remarkable. He was in eighteen distinct battles and many skirmishes, and received not a mark: and this war record closed in his twenty-ninth year.

Birth: Aug. 10, 1837
Death: May 12, 1904

Civil War Union Brevet Brigadier General. At the start of the Civil War he resigned his post as city surveyor of Cincinnati, Ohio to organize an artillery battery from Southwestern Ohio. He fought in battles in Missouri and at Shiloh. General Ulysses Grant appointed him chief engineer in charge of all operations for the campaign and march through Georgia. He was named brevet brigadier general on May 20, 1865. After the war he returned to Cincinnati where he was the U.S. Marshall for southern Ohio. In 1871 he became the city's chief engineer. In 1877 he resigned that position to become the president of the Cincinnati Gas, Light and Coke Company, a post he held the rest of his life. Additionally, from 1880 to 1882 he served as lieutenant-governor of Ohio. He devoted much of his life to writing about the Civil War and street lighting

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