Summary

Major Bolling Robertson Chinn of the 9th Louisianna Battalion distinguished himself at the Battle of Baton Rouge. Captured at Port Gibson, he was a POW.

Conflict Period:
Civil War (Confederate) 1
Branch:
Confederate Army 1
Rank:
Captain 1
Birth:
23 Jun 1825 1
Death:
23 Apr 1888 1
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Personal Details

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Full Name:
Bolling Robertson Chinn 1
Birth:
23 Jun 1825 1
Death:
23 Apr 1888 1
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Civil War (Confederate) 1

Branch:
Confederate Army 1
Rank:
Captain 1
Rank:
Major 1

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Sources

  1. Contributed by Pamkf
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Stories

Civil War Service

baton rouge, louisianna

Source: http://www.mathewscommunications.com/mathews/mw1/mw1n29.htm#2143 Bolling Chinn was a Major in the Confederate Army during the Civil War.In a book titled, "Portraits of Conflict", by Moneyhon & Roberts, Univ. of Arkansas Press, 1990 (ISBN No. 1-55T8-159-9), p. 141, and 321, there is reference to and a photo of B.R. Chinn with the 9th Louisiana Battalion. It also states that he was a POW during the Civil War, and that he died in Baton Rouge, LA on April 24, 1888. (From "Records of Louisiana Confederate Soldiers and Louisiana Confederate Commands", Andrew B. Booth, 1984, The Reprint Company, Publishers, Spartanburg, NC):Chinn, B.R., Capt. Co. C 9th Battn. La. Infty. En. _____. roll for Sept and Oct 1862, present. Federal Rolls of Prisoners of War, Captured Port Hudson Louisiana, July 9th, 1863. Sent to New Orleans, LA, on board Steamer Zephyr, July 13, 1863. Transfd. to Fort Columbus, New York Harbor, Oct. 10th, 1863. Recd. at Johnson's Island, Ohio, Oct. 13th, 1863. Transfd. to Fort Delaware, Delaware June 23rd, 1864. paroled at Fort Delaware, Del. Oct. 6th, 1864. Forwd. to Pt. Lookout, Md. Recd. at Coxe's Wharf, james River, VA, Oct 15th, 1864, and exchanged.

Added by Pamkf

Additional Biography

Here is what I found on www.SaundersFamilyHistory.com on Francis Sophia Conrad. Major Bolling Robertson Chinn, Thomas's father, was born in 1824 in Baton Rouge, Louisiana and was the son of Judge Thomas Withers Chinn (1791-1852), and his wife Elizabeth Johnson (1794-1877). In 1848 he married Frances Sophia Conrad, eldest daughter of Mr. & Mrs. Frederick D. Conrad. Frederick D. Conrad was a wealthy sugar planter of East Baton Rouge. He was the brother of Charles M. Conrad, who was a member of the famous New Orleans law firm of Slidell, Conrad and Benjamin. Charles M. Conrad was Secretary for War during President Buchanan's administration (1857-1861), and was appointed Confederate States Minister to Germany by President Jefferson Davis. Charles M. Conrad married Angela Lewis of Virginia. She was the great-granddaughter of Martha Washington. For information about an early Chinn in Louisana, there is a newspaper article from State-Times, Baton Rouge (12 Oct 1981) "WBR planter's final burial place is no longer a mystery" concerning Thomas Withers Chinn. I got a copy from the Kentucky State Historical Society in Frankfort. Email me if you would care for a copy (dblchinn@cox.net)

Added by Pamkf

Bolling Robertson Chinn: From saundersfamilywebsite.com

Microsoft Word - Chapter 11 - The Chinn Family

Bolling Chinn took control of Cypress Hall Plantation on the Mississippi River in West Baton Rouge, Louisiana on the death of his father in 1852. During the Civil War the plantation was burnt to the ground to light the way for Yankee gunboats coming up the Mississippi. Bolling had served with distinction during the war. Under General H. W. Allen’s brigade, the then Captain Chinn marched from Camp Moore to Baton Rouge and participated with his company in the battle of the 5th of August, receiving a flesh wound in the leg early in the action. After recovering from his wound he returned to his command at Port Hudson and remained with it, commanding the battalion most of the time before, and during the siege.

At the surrender of Port Hudson he was sent with the other officers to Northern prisons, where he remained until exchanged near the close of the war. Upon his return he was promoted to the rank of major. However, soon the final surrender took place and he returned to his home in West Baton Rouge where he found ruin and desolation where once had been peace and prosperity. Nothing daunted, he began with determined purpose to retrieve his lost fortune and conducted his plantation in a successful manner until 1885, when he removed to East Baton Rouge, where he remained up until the time of his death. In 1866 he was elected to the legislature, being the first representative from his parish after the war. He was a typical southerner, a distinguished member of the school of courtly and polished gentleman. His wife was a woman of the highest refinement, culture and education. She was reared in

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Chapter 11 THE CHINN FAMILY

luxury, being the eldest daughter of wealthy parents. Mrs. Chinn was married early in life and at her husband's side also enjoyed all that wealth could procure, but when the Civil War was inaugurated and he went forth to battle she took her little children and throughout the struggle lived in a rough pine-wood cabin in the woods, surrounded by dangers, deserted by her servants, sometimes scarcely knowing where her next meal would come from.  www.saundersfamilyhistory.com

 

 

Added by Pamkf

Story About Some of His Time in Prison

Microsoft Word - Chapter 11 - The Chinn Family

Hanging Rock Rebel, Lt. John Blue’s War in West Virginia and the Shenandoah Valley,

edited by Dan Oates and published by Burd Street Press, 1994 details the memoirs of Lt. Blue’s Civil War experiences. When he was captured, Lt. Blue was transferred to the Federal POW camp at Point Lookout on Chesapeake Bay, Maryland, where he shared quarters with Major Bolling Chinn.

Lt. Blue wrote his memoirs some 35 years after the end of the Civil War and while some of the detail concerning Bolling Chinn appears inaccurate, he does flesh out a little of the character and personality of the man.

p. 270
Ten men were quartered in each tent. In our tent were Maj. Chinn, of Louisiana, Capt. Wheeler, Capt Bullock, of Tennessee ... and myself. Capt. [sic] Chinn, if I remember right, was captured at Port Hudson. By the terms of capitulation the field officers were allowed to retain all their private baggage. The Major had two large trunks, one containing his wardrobe and bedding; the bedding consisted of a single hair mattress, pillow, sheets, blankets, &c. The Major was wealthy at the commencement of the war. He owned a fine sugar plantation, owned over five hundred slaves. He said he had built a fine house two years before the war on a bluff near the Mississippi river, above Baton Rouge, that cost him $25,000. Major Chinn raised and equipped a battalion of 500 men at his own expense, and marched them to Port Hudson, Louisiana. On the fall of Vicksburg, Port Hudson was surrendered, conditionally, the field officers being allowed the above named privileges of carrying with them their private baggage. These officers were sent to Johnson’s Island, where I met Major Chinn for the first time. He seemed to take a great liking for me from our first meeting. When we moved into our new quarters the Major insisted that I must take up my abode in the same tent that he did. A few days after we had moved from the Hospital (at Point Lookout, Maryland) the Major received the unwelcome news through a prisoner and a neighbor of his, recently captured, that his elegant house had been burned, and

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Chapter 11 THE CHINN FAMILY

that his wife and daughter, an only child, were living in a negro cabin on the farm and cared for by some of her aged Slaves, who refused to leave them. The Major was made up of American, French and Creole; the language used was of about the same complexion. When this unwelcome news reached the Major his language was far more emphatic than elegant ... . The officer in command had ordered the house set on fire to give them light to work by. For several days it seemed as though the Major would lose his mind. One morning he (Major Chinn) called me to where he lay and said, “this is sad news for me; I care nothing for my house and slaves, but the thought of what my wife and daughter may have to endure, is almost more than I can bear. They, who have from early infancy had every known wish gratified, may be in want of bread.”

Lt. Blue's recollections of Major Chinn are somewhat inaccurate. Bolling Chinn had numerous children including at least five daughters and two sons, several born prior to the outbreak of the Civil War. His ethnic background was English-Scottish, not French, although growing up in the Baton Rouge-New Orleans area, he probably spoke passable French which might have influenced his American accent, particularly to the ear of a Virginian.

 

Added by Pamkf

Obituary from Times-Picayune

Baton Rouge, Louisianna

Microsoft Word - Chapter 11 - The Chinn Family

Brenda Perkins of Baton Rouge provided the following article from the the Times-Picayune which published a copy of an obituary printed in the West Baton Rouge Sugar Planter on the 5th of May 1888:

Bolling Robert Chinn

We copy from the West Baton Rouge Sugar Planter the following deserved tribute to a highly esteemed citizen of that parish, who departed this life at his home on 24th ult:

Bolling Robertson Chinn was born in West Feliciana on the 23d of June, 1825. His parents removed to this parish in 1827. In 1848 he married Miss Frances S. Conrad, daughter of Mr. F. D. Conrad, of East Baton Rouge. Major Chinn was a volunteer in the Mexican war, through which he served with distinction. Upon the breaking out of the civil war he organized in this parish the Lemmon Guards, of which he was made captain. In the battle of Baton Rouge, in which he was wounded, Major Chinn, in charge of Bynum’s Brigade, displayed a degree of bravery and coolness, under the most trying circumstances, that elicited the warm admiration of his comrades.

He was taken prisoner at the surrender of Port Hudson and sent to Johnston’s Island, where he remained almost until Lee’s surrender. Upon being exchanged he was immediately promoted to the rank of major and made every effort to get his old command together but before he could do so peace was declared. Major Chinn then returned to his old home in this parish, where he found ruin and desolation where once had been peace and prosperity. Nothing daunted, he set to work with a vim to retrieve his lost fortune, and pursued the occupation of a planter on his old home place until 1885, when he removed to East Baton Rouge, where he remained up to the time of his death. He was elected to the Legislature in 1866, being the first representative from this parish after the war and before Radical rule.

Patriotic and loyal in his devotion to his native state, firm and courageous in any cause he espoused, he never faltered in the discharge of his duty, however trying the ordeal. A recent instance will serve as an illustration of his devotion to duty, even in the face of the shadow of death. On the occasion of the late general election, although then dangerously ill and unable to stand alone, he insisted upon being placed in a buggy and driven to the polls, where, not being able to get out, the ballot-box was brought to him in order that he might deposit his last vote for the Democratic ticket – the party he loved so well and served so faithfully.

Major Bolling R. Chinn was a typical Southerner – a distinguished member of the school of courtly and polished gentleman that is, alas! so rapidly passing away. Brave, charitable and generous to a fault; kind and indulgent as a husband and father; conscientious in the performance of all his duties as a citizen, he embodied within himself those admirable traits and virtues that go to make up the highest type of man. He leaves a wife, six children and a large circle of friends and relative to mourn his loss. May the sod be ever green on his grave!

The father of the deceased, Hon. Thomas Withers Chinn, was a native of Kentucky. He emigrated to Louisiana at an early day, and subsequently was elected to Congress, representing this State with honor from 1839 to 1841, and was subsequently appointed United States minister to the kingdom of the Four Sicilies. He was the personal friend of Clay, Webster and President Taylor, and stood among the first of the Whig statesmen of his day. His son was a worthy descendant of such distinguished stock.

 

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