Summary

Boyington was the highest-scoring Marine Corps fighter ace in World War II. He was awarded the Medal of Honor.

Conflict Period:
World War II 1
Branch:
Marine Corps 1
Rank:
Major 1
Birth:
04 Dec 1912 2
Coeur d'Alene, Idaho 2
Idaho 1
Death:
11 Jan 1988 2
Fresno, California 2
More…

Related Pages

+
View more similar pages

Pictures & Records (13)

Add Show More

Personal Details

Edit
Full Name:
Gregory "Pappy" Boyington 2
Full Name:
Gregory Boyington 1
Also known as:
Pappy Boyington 2
Birth:
04 Dec 1912 2
Coeur d'Alene, Idaho 2
Idaho 1
Death:
11 Jan 1988 2
Fresno, California 2
Burial:
Arlington National Cemetery, Virginia 2
Edit
Birth:
Mother: Grace Gregory Boyington 3
Father: Charles Boyington 3
Marriage:
Helene Clark 2
1934 4
Marriage:
Josephine Moseman 2
1978 5
Marriage:
Dolores Shade 2
1959 6
Marriage:
Frances Baker 2
1946 4
Edit

World War II 1

Branch:
Marine Corps 1
Rank:
Major 1
Enlistment Location:
Washington 1
Date:
12 Sep 1943 1
Location:
Central Solomons area 1
Military Unit:
Marine Squadron 214 1

Other Service 2

Branch:
Marine Corps 2
Rank:
Colonel 7
Service Start Date:
1934 2
Service End Date:
1947 2

Looking for more information about Gregory Boyington?

Search through millions of records to find out more.

Stories

For extraordinary heroism and valiant devotion to duty as commanding officer of Marine Fighting Squadron 214 in action against enemy Japanese forces in the Central Solomons area from 12 September 1943 to 3 January 1944. Consistently outnumbered throughout successive hazardous flights over heavily defended hostile territory, Maj. Boyington struck at the enemy with daring and courageous persistence, leading his squadron into combat with devastating results to Japanese shipping, shore installations, and aerial forces. Resolute in his efforts to inflict crippling damage on the enemy, Maj. Boyington led a formation of 24 fighters over Kahili on 17 October and, persistently circling the airdrome where 60 hostile aircraft were grounded, boldly challenged the Japanese to send up planes. Under his brilliant command, our fighters shot down 20 enemy craft in the ensuing action without the loss of a single ship. A superb airman and determined fighter against overwhelming odds, Maj. Boyington personally destroyed 26 of the many Japanese planes shot down by his squadron and, by his forceful leadership, developed the combat readiness in his command which was a distinctive factor in the Allied aerial achievements in this vitally strategic area.

Boyington MIA after being shot down

Rabaul, Papua New Guinea

On January 3, 1944, after shooting down his 26th plane, Boyington was shot down himself during a mission over Rabaul, Papua New Guinea, and declared missing in action. He was picked up by a Japanese submarine and placed in various prison camps. He was finally liberated from Omori Prison Camp on August 29, 1945. He received the Medal of Honor and Navy Cross.

About this Memorial Page

Anyone can contribute to this page. Please sign in or sign up—it's free.

Created:
Modified:
Page Views:
277 total (18 this week)

×