Summary

Conflict Period:
Civil War (Confederate) 1
Branch:
Confederate Army 1
Rank:
Brigadier General 2
Birth:
29 May 1827 2
Logan, Virginia, (now West Virginia) 2
Death:
07 Jun 1890 2
Fluvanna County, Virginia 2
More…

Related Pages

+
View more similar pages

Pictures & Records (6)

Add Show More

Personal Details

Edit
Full Name:
Reuben Lindsey Walker 1
Birth:
29 May 1827 2
Logan, Virginia, (now West Virginia) 2
Death:
07 Jun 1890 2
Fluvanna County, Virginia 2
Edit

Civil War (Confederate) 1

Branch:
Confederate Army 1
Rank:
Brigadier General 2
Enlistment Date:
1862 1

Looking for more information about Reuben Lindsey Walker?

Search through millions of records to find out more.

Sources

  1. Civil War Soldiers - Confederate - Officers [See image]
  2. Contributed by bruceyrock632
Add

Stories

Reuben Lindsey Walker

Reuben Lindsay Walker was born May 29, 1827 in Logan Virginia. Graduating from Virginia Military Institute in 1845, Walker worked as an engineer and farmer until the outbreak of the Civil War. 

 

In 1861 Walker was commissioned to captain in the Purcell Artillery unit in the Army of Northern Virginia. In March of 1862 he received a promotion to major and named chief of artillery for Brigadier General A.P. Hill’s division.  Over the next three years, Walker was promoted to Colonel and took command of the artillery for Hill’s entire Third Corps. 

In February, 1865 Walkerreceived a promotion to Brigadier General and commanded Lee’s reserve artillery in the retreat west during the Appomattox Campaign.  Walker amassed a lengthy combat record, serving in every one of the Army of Northern Virginia's major battles except the Seven Days campaign.  Although illness kept him in Richmond throughout the Seven Days campaign, Walker was never injured during his service in over 60 battles, despite the fact that he presented a large target at 6’4”.

 

Following the war, Walker returned to his career as a civil engineer, moving to Selma Alabama in 1872 where he became the superintendent of the Marine and Selma Railroad.  Returning to Richmond, he worked for theRichmond Street railways and as an engineer for the Richmond and Allegheny Railroad.  During this time he also oversaw the construction of an addition to the Virginia State Penitentiary and the Texas State Capitol building. Reuben Lindsay Walker died in Fluvanna County Virginia on June 7, 1890 of Blight’s disease, a form of kidney disease.  He is buried in Richmond’s Hollywood Cemetery.

Brigadier General Reuben Lindsey Walker

Brigadier-General Reuben Lindsay Walker was born at Logan, Albemarle county, Va., May 29, 1827. His father was Capt. Lewis Walker, and his early home was in a part of the State noted for wealth and refinement, the prominent families of which were connected with his by blood and affinity. He was graduated in 1845 at the Virginia military institute, where his popularity among his fellow cadets is one of the pleasant traditions of the school. After graduation he adopted the profession of civil engineer, and became employed upon the extension of the Chesapeake & Ohio railroad. In 1857 he married a daughter of Dr. Albert Elam, of Chesterfield county, and a few years later engaged in farming in New Kent county. He was sergeant-at-arms of the memorable Virginia convention of 1861, and immediately after the passage of the ordinance of secession he applied to Governor Letcher for commission and permission to organize an expedition to surprise and capture Fortress Monroe. The governor denied him this opportunity, but his ability was recognized by a commission as captain and assignment to command of the Purcell battery, the first company of that arm to leave Richmond. He was stationed with this company on the Potomac near Aquia creek, and from that region he reached the field of First Manassas in time to shell the retreating Federals with his six Parrott guns. He subsequently was in action at Potomac creek, Aquia creek, Marlborough point, Free Stone point and Evans' point during the summer and fall of 1861. March 31, 1862, he was promoted major, and in this rank he served as chief of artillery of A. P. Hill's division. During the Seven Days' battles he was sick at Richmond, but after that he was identified with the operations of A. P. Hill's command until the close of the war. During the reduction of Harper's Ferry, in the Maryland campaign, he crossed the Shenandoah with several batteries and secured a position on Loudoun heights that commanded the enemy's works. At Fredcricksburg Hill reported that Lieutenant-Colonel Walker "directed the fire from his guns with admirable coolness and precision." Promotion to colonel rapidly followed, in which rank he fought at Chancellorsville, and when Hill was called to command the Third army corps, Colonel Walker was appointed chief of artillery of that command. At Gettysburg he commanded sixty-three guns and handled them with skill and effect, and later in 1863 he took part in various minor engagements. In the campaign of 1864 he served in all the principal battles, beginning with the Wilderness and closing with Reams' Station. In January, 1865, he was promoted brigadier-general and assigned to command of the Third artillery corps, still attached to Hill's army corps. Of the conduct of his command in the final days at Petersburg, it was reported: "The conduct of officers and men was worthy of all praise, and that of the drivers and supernumeraries of the artillery, who had been by General Walker armed with muskets, deserves special mention. Those in Fort Gregg fought until literally crushed by numbers, and scarcely a man survived." On the retreat he reached with his artillery a point between Appomattox Court House and Station, where he was attacked by Custer's cavalry division on April 8th. The dashing Federal general reported: "The enemy succeeded in repulsing nearly all our attacks, until nearly 9 o'clock at night, when by a general advance along my line he was forced from his position." On the next day the army was surrendered, and General Walker retired to private life, with a record of participation in sixty-three battles and combats. In 1872, after some years devoted to farming, he removed to Alabama, as superintendent of the Marion & Selma railroad, but four years later returned to Virginia. He was connected with the Richmond & Danville railroad, later had charge of the Richmond street railways, took part in the construction of the Richmond & Alleghany railroad, and was superintendent of the building of the women's department of the State penitentiary. In 1884 he became superintendent of construction of the Texas State capitol and resided at Austin until 1888. Subsequently he lived upon his farm at the confluence of the James and Rivanna rivers, until his death, June 7, 1890.

About this Memorial Page

Anyone can contribute to this page. Please sign in or sign up—it's free.

Created:
Modified:
Page Views:
233 total (18 this week)

×