Summary

Conflict Period:
Civil War (Union) 1
Branch:
Army 1
Birth:
07 May 1838 2
Huntsburg, Geauga County, Ohio, USA 2
Death:
20 Jul 1864 2
Andersonville, Sumter County, Georgia, USA 2
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Personal Details

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Full Name:
Charles P Tucker 1
Birth:
07 May 1838 2
Huntsburg, Geauga County, Ohio, USA 2
Death:
20 Jul 1864 2
Andersonville, Sumter County, Georgia, USA 2
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Civil War (Union) 1

Branch:
Army 1
Company:
I 1
Discharge Rank:
Pvt 1
Enlistment Rank:
Pvt 1
Military Unit:
1st Infantry 1
State:
Wisconsin 1

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Sources

  1. Civil War Service Index - Union - Wisconsin [See image]
  2. Contributed by gnetz51
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Stories

An Early Report of Wisconsin Deaths at Andersonville

On 14 Jun 1865. the Janesville Gazette of Janesville, Wisconsin, published a list of Wisconsin soldiers who were buried at Andersonville, based on Confederate records. The compiler of the list, Henry F. Lines of Headquarters Cavalry Corps, M.D.M., Macon, Georgia, stated that he knew that the list was incomplete and erroneous, but it was the best information available at  present.

The Wisconsin Adjutant General's office added a note to the list agreeing that some of the information was incorrect but concurring that the list needed to be published. C.P. Tucker's name appears in the list, but details, including rank and date of death, do not agree with the official lists of Andersonville deaths and burials released later.

The outrage of the treatment and burials Union soldiers received was keenly felt and clearly expressed by Lines. I quote from his letter attached to the list:

"...[T]hat mistakes should be made is natural. I merely send it to you as it is, thinking that there may be no better opportunity, and that Wisconsin should have a record of her sons who have starved to death in that abominable hole prepared for their reception by the chivalry of the south -- the Prison Pen at Andersonville.

"The prison was established in February or March 1864, but does not seem to have received any prisoners until April. There were about 5,000 in prison up to the middle of April, 1865, when they were removed to Florida upon Gen. Wilson's approach. They have since been exchanged.

"The largest number ever together at one time in prison was on August 9th, 1864 -- 33,006. August can boast too of having had the most deaths of any one month -- 2992. Most on any one day, August 23, 1864 -- 127. [Note: Charles P. Tucker died on August 20, 1864, according to some records, or on July 16,1864, according to others .]

"The Hospital Register shows 12,848 souls to have been buried in all; though the graves number 12,940. Our soldiers were buried like carrion; a long ditch 3 feet by 6-1/2 wide was made, in which the chivalrous southrons placed them without a sign of a coffin, on their sides, so that each soldier occupied just about one foot of the length of the ditch. Thus they were packed and dirt shoveled over and onto their bodies.

"There stand the 12,940 graves an everlasting monument of damning infamy to all who were concerned in the starvation and killing of our soldiers..."

Source: Janesville Daily Gazette (Janesville, Wisconsin), 14 June 1865, Page 2. Viewed on 13 Jan 2014 at http://www.newspapers.com/clip/277308/wisconsin_soldiers_buried_at/

This story was added by Genevieve Hill Netz. Write to gnetz51@gmail.com .

Private Charles P Tucker's life ended in Andersonville, Georgia

Charles Plympton Tucker was born on 07 May 1838, at Huntsburg, Geauga County, Ohio, the oldest child of William O. and  Sarah (Hinkley) Tucker. Before 1845, the Tuckers moved to Sheboygan County, Wisconsin, where other members of the Hinkley family had settled, and Charles was raised on a farm there.

Charles P. Tucker served as a private in Company I, 1st Regiment, Wisconsin Infantry. I don't know the date of his enlistment in the Army, but the 1st Regiment was mustered into Federal service on October 19, 1861.

Charles P. Tucker was captured on 20 Sep 1863 at Chickamauga, Georgia, on the second day of fighting in a battle that ended in Union defeat.

On 6 July 1864, Charles P. Tucker died at the Prisoner of War camp at Andersonville, Georgia, of diarrhea (or dysentery as we call it today.) He was 26 years old at the time of his death. He is buried in grave 3661 at Andersonville. 

The famous photographs of Andersonville were taken during August of 1864, so we can be very sure that they accurately reflect the conditions in which he died and the way that he was buried.

I am writing this story because this young man's sacrifice should not be forgotten. My husband and I respect beyond words the terrible price he paid to serve his state and nation. As long as we live, we will remember him, honor him, and speak of him.

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