Summary

Horace "Harry" Albert Anderson

Conflict Period:
Civil War (Union) 1
Branch:
Army 1
Rank:
Private 1
Birth:
07 Sep 1843 1
Baltimore, Maryland 1
Death:
November 7,1937 1
Woodlawn, Md. 1
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Personal Details

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Person:
Horace Anderson 2
Age: 18 2
Birth:
07 Sep 1843 1
Baltimore, Maryland 1
Male 1
Birth:
Baltimore, Maryland 1
Male 1
Death:
November 7,1937 1
Woodlawn, Md. 1
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Civil War (Union) 1

Branch:
Army 1
Rank:
Private 1
Service Start Date:
15 Aug 1862 1
Service End Date:
17 Jun 1865 1
Enlistment Location:
Druid Hill Park, Baltimore, Md. 1

Civil War (Union) 1

Branch:
Army 1
Rank:
Private 1

Civil War (Union) 2

Branch:
Army 2
Enlistment Date:
1865 2
Military Unit:
Purnell Legion, Cavalry, Tro-Y AND Baltimore Battery, Light Artillery, A-Ga 2
State:
Maryland 2

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Sources

  1. Contributed by rjoneckis097
  2. Civil War Soldiers - Union - MD [See image]
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Stories

Horace “Harry” Albert Anderson – Private – DOB 9-7-1843 - DOD 11-7-1937

Frederick W. Wild age 19, (not related) author of ‘Memoirs and History of Capt. Alexander’s Baltimore Battery of Light Artillery ‘ wrote that, “the war had been going on for a year or two now and President Lincoln called for 300,000 more volunteers. There was a new awakening as to the necessity of a more vigorous effort on the part of the loyal people of the county, if the Union was to be preserved.“ As a result Frederick Wild decided to “offer his services” and volunteer. He was not alone as friends and schoolmates did the same, enough to make a gun squad. In Wild’s book he doesn’t name very many names certainly not the names of his friends that enlisted or served with him. We do know two family members that were in the same company. Frederick Miller who was drafted at the age of 50 in 1864 and in the book is mentioned as Wild’s friend. Second is Horace “Harry“ Anderson age 19 who later became Miller’s son-in-law. Wild and Anderson enlisted 10 days apart, Wild was underage and had his father sign for him which took several days. It is pretty certain that they knew each other along the journey. Horace volunteered in Baltimore with the Baltimore Battery of Light Artillery and was assigned to Alexander’s company. Horace was mustered in Aug.15, 1862 Horace participated in the defense of Williamsport, Maryland Heights, Berryville, Harper’s Ferry, Washington D.C. and the defense of Baltimore. Mustered out June17, 1865. Note: Baltimore Battery Light Artillery “Alexanders”

The last Union survivor of the Battle of Monocacy was Private Horace (Harry) Alford Anderson of the Baltimore Battery of Light Artillery. Born on September 7, 1843, Harry enlisted in the summer of 1862 when the battery was forming. He mustered out in the summer of 1865 and died November 7, 1937 at the age of 94. He is buried at Woodlawn Cemetery in Baltimore County. Interestingly, his future father-in-law was also in the Baltimore Battery, Private Fred Miller. *From National Park Service online www.nps.gov/mono/historyculture/interesting-facts.htm Note: Frederick Miller and Frederick Wild served in the “Alexanders” and is on the same roster.

Battle of the Monocacy Interesting Facts • From the National Park Service Web Site*

The Battle of Monocacy is the only Confederate victory on Union soil.

• Kentucky native Theodore O'Hara - author of the poem Bivouac of the Dead (1847) - fought with the 12th Alabama at the Battle of Monocacy. The first verse of the poem: "The muffled drum's sad roll has beat The soldier's last Tattoo; No more on life's parade shall meet That brave and fallen few. On Fame's eternal camping ground Their silent tents are spread, And glory guards, with solemn round The bivouac of the dead."

• The last Union survivor of the Battle of Monocacy was Private Horace (Harry) Alford Anderson of the Baltimore Battery of Light Artillery. Born on September 7, 1843, Harry enlisted in the summer of 1862 when the battery was forming. He mustered out in the summer of 1865 and died November 7, 1937 at the age of 94. He is buried at Woodlawn Cemetery in Baltimore County. Interestingly, his future father-in-law was also in the Baltimore Battery, Private Fred Miller.

• William H. Seward, Jr. - son of the Union Secretary of State - fought at the battle with the 9th New York Heavy Artillery.

• Private Charles C. Tomkins of the 14th Virginia Cavalry Regiment fought at the Battle of Monocacy and was the first cousin of Union Lieutenant General Ulysses S. Grant. After the surrender at Appomatox, Tomkins paid Grant a visit. Grant gave him a horse, $250, and two canteens of whiskey.

• Union General Lew Wallace, commander of Federal forces at Monocacy, served as a member of the military commission that tried those accused of President Lincoln's assassination.

• Before the Civil War, Christian K. Thomas and his family were living in Baltimore, MD. As war loomed, Thomas decided to move his family to his native Frederick County where he thought they would be safe from the ravages of war. As it turned out, the heaviest fighting during the Battle of Monocacy occurred around the Thomas home while the frightened family hid in the cellar.

• The 14th New Jersey Regiment had 15 officers present at the battle. Only three escaped without injury. Four were killed in action, while eight were wounded. The 14th New Jersey also had more wounded and killed than any other Union regiment in the battle.

• Glenn Worthington, a six-year-old observer of the battle from his basement, wrote the first book-length account. His book served as a catalyst for the park being designated as a National Military Park in 1934.

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