Summary

Daniel Morgan, a Representative from Virginia began his military service as a civilian teamster and later a rifleman during the French and Indian War. The Congressional Congress called for ten rifle companies to join the newly made Continental Army. Morgan was chosen by his state to form a company and lead as Commander. He assembled nearly 100 men to what was called, "Morgan's Riflemen." The men were equipped with rifles having lighter barrels and better accuracy, making it easier to advance using guerilla tactics against the British. Throughout the American Revolutionary War, Morgan would lead and fight with companies in the Invasion of Canada, Battle of Saratoga, Battle of Freeman's Farm, Battle of Bemis Heights, and the Battle of Cowpens.

Birth:
06 Jul 1736 1
Hunterdon County, NJ 2
Death:
06 Jul 1802 2
Winchester, VA 2
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Personal Details

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Full Name:
Daniel Morgan 1
Also known as:
"The Old Waggoneer" 1
Birth:
06 Jul 1736 1
Hunterdon County, NJ 1
Male 1
Death:
06 Jul 1802 1
Winchester, VA 1
Burial:
Burial Date: 13 Jun 1868 2
Burial Place: Mt. Hebron Cemetery, Winchester, VA 2
Burial:
Burial Date: 1802 1
Burial Place: Old Stone Presbyterian Church, Winchester, VA 1
Residence:
Place: Saratoga, Boyce, VA 1
From: 1782 1
To: 1802 1
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Birth:
Mother: Eleanor Lloyd 1
Father: James Morgan 1
Marriage:
Abigail Curry 3
1762 3
Winchester, VA 3
Spouse Death Date: 20 May 1816 3
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Occupation:
teamster, farmer, soldier 1
Religion:
Presbyterian 1
Race or Ethnicity:
White 1
Employment:
Employer: U.S. Continental Army 1
Position: Colonel 1
Start Date: 1777 1
End Date: 12 Oct 1780 1
Employment:
Employer: U.S. Continental Army 1
Position: Captain 1
Start Date: 1775 1
End Date: 1777 1
Employment:
Employer: U.S. Continental Army 1
Position: Brigadier General 1
Start Date: 13 Oct 1780 1
End Date: 1781 1
Employment:
Employer: British provincial forces 4
Position: teamster and ensign 4
Place: Fort Cumberland, MD 4
Start Date: 1754 4
End Date: 1759 4

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Stories

Daniel Morgan helped suppress Whiskey Rebellion, 1794

Western Pennsylvania

"I Dont wish to spill the Blood of a citizen but I wish to March against them people, to show them our Determonation to bring to order and to support the Laws."

-- Daniel Morgan to President George Washington, September 24, 1794

 

(http://founders.archives.gov/?q=Daniel%20Morgan&s=1111311111&sa=Morgan%2C%20Daniel&r=22&sr=)

Daniel Morgan

Daniel Morgan, a Representative from Virginia began his military service as a civilian teamster and later a rifleman during the French and Indian War. The Congressional Congress called for ten rifle companies to join the newly made Continental Army. Morgan was chosen by his state to form a company and lead as Commander. He assembled nearly 100 men to what was called, "Morgan's Riflemen." The men were equipped with rifles having lighter barrels and better accuracy, making it easier to advance using guerilla tactics against the British. In 1775, Morgan's Riflemen were chosen to join volunteer companies in Boston to invade Canada. Colonel Benedict Arnold selected Captain Morgan to lead all companies as one. It was during the Battle of Quebec on December 31st where Morgan, along with hundreds of other men, were surrounded by French-Canadian forces and surrendered his sword. He remained in enemy capture until 1777. When he rejoined his country he was welcomed back with the promotion to Colonel. On June 13, 1777, Morgan commanded the Provisional Rifle Corps- 11th Infantry, a unit of 500 riflemen selected from Pennsylvania, Maryland and Virginia. The infantry successfully advanced on the rear of General William Howe's guard in New Jersey. Advancing to the Battle of Saratoga and the following, Battle of Freeman's Farm. There, British units formed, only to be broken by distant and accurate rifle fire.

Colonel Morgan resigned from duty on June 30, 1779. He was urged to rejoin, and resisted until the results of the Battle of Camden proved disastrous. He re-enlisted in the Southern Army on October 2nd, and on the 13th was awarded a promotion to Brigadier General. He went on to his final stand, the Battle of Cowpens. This battle has been thought of as a tactical masterpiece of the war. He formed three lines out of site of the enemy. The militia line would fire, then retreat. The retreat gave them time to relaod as the British advanced. Out of the 1,076 British soldiers, 110 were killed and around 800 captured. The British retreated with only around 200 men.

Morgan was elected Representative in the House of Representatives from 1797-1799. He declined renomination due to failing health. His last days were sent in Westchester, VA where he died on July 6, 1802. He was buried at Old Stone Presbyterian Church and after the American Civil War, was moved to Mt. Hebron Cemetery in Winchester, Virginia.

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