Summary

Soldier in Co. G, 129th IL INF

Birth:
01 Nov 1834 1
Vermont 1
Death:
15 Jan 1906 1
Livingston County, Illinois 1
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Personal Details

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Full Name:
Orlin Converse 1
Birth:
01 Nov 1834 1
Vermont 1
Male 1
Death:
15 Jan 1906 1
Livingston County, Illinois 1
Burial:
Burial Date: Patty Cemetery 1
Burial Place: Owego Twp., Livingston County, Illinois 1
Physical Description:
Height: 5' 10" 1
Eye Color: blue 1
Hair Color: brown 1
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Marriage:
Rebecca Rockwood 1
07 Jan 1862 1
Livingston County, Illinois 1
Spouse Death Date: 03 Nov 1920 1

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Stories

From the 1900 History of Livingston County: "ORLIN CONVERSE. Orlin Converse, a worthy representative of the agricultural interests of Livingston county, owns and occupies a fine farm of two hundred acres of well-improved and valuable land on section 33, Owego township, and also has an eighty-acre tract two miles from his home. A native of Addison county, Vermont, he was born on Lake Champlain, under the shadows of the Green mountains, November 1, 1834, and is a son of Heman Converse, who was horn in the same state in 1799, his ancestors being among the pioneers of Vermont. There his grandfather, Pain Converse, spent his entire life. He was a soldier of the war of 1812. The father grew to manhood in his native county, and married Hannah Crampton, who was born in the same house where our subject's birth occurred, and where both parents died, the father in 1870, at the age of seventy one years, the mother in 1888. Orlin Converse passed his boyhood and youth on the home farm, aiding in its operation and attending the common schools of the neighborhood. He came west in 1855, joining his sister Emily, wife of Robert Smith, who had located in Livingston county, Illinois, a year or two previously. He engaged in farming in partnership with his brother-in-law until August, 1862, when he enlisted for three years or during the war in Company G, One Hundred and Twenty- ninth Volunteer Infantry, which was assigned to the Army of the Cumberland. He participated in the battles of Resaca and Kenesaw, and all the engagements of the Atlanta campaign, being under fire every day for a month. After the capture of the city the regiment went with Sherman on the march to the sea, and was in the Carolina campaign, taking part in the last battle of the war — that of Bentonville, North Carolina. Marching through Richmond, they proceeded to Washington, D. C, and participated in the grand review in that city. Hostilities having ceased, Mr. Converse was honorably discharged and returned to his home in Illinois. He had lost no time from illness or other causes, with exception of the twenty days' furlough he was given in 1864. Before entering the service Mr. Converse was married, in this county, January 7, 1862, to Miss Rebecca Rockwood, who was born here. Her father, Daniel Rockwood. was a native of Massachusetts and one of the pioneers of Livingston county, having located here in 1834. He helped to lay out the county seat and organize Owego township, where he took up a claim and entered land, making it his home until his death. Two children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Converse, but Rollin P. enlisted in the Third United States Infantry during the Spanish American war, and was taken ill and died at Atlanta, Georgia. September _•,}. 1898. His remains were brought back and interred in Patty cemetery. Jessie, the only daughter, died in 1870, at the age of nearly three years. Mr. Converse's first purchase of land consisted of forty acres in Owego township where he now resides, and as his financial resources increased he added to it from time to time until he now has over two hundred and eighty acres of fine farming land, which he has placed under a high state of cultivation and improved with good and substantial buildings. He commenced life here in limited circumstances, and the success that he has achieved is due entirely to his own well-directed and energetic efforts. After residing here for five years he returned east in 1861 to visit his mother, friends and scenes of his youth. By this time be had accumulated three hundred and fifty dollars in the old George Smith money of Atlanta, Georgia, but one week after his return home it was worth only fifty cents on the dollar, and at the end of another the entire amount was not worth a dollar. He was thus forced to walk back and was six weeks in reaching this county. Since casting his first presidential vote for John C. Fremont in 1856, Mr. Converse has been a stanch supporter of the Republican party, and he most acceptably served as supervisor of his township two terms, during which time he was a member of some important committees. He has ever taken an active and commendable interest in educational affairs, has been a member of the school board twenty years, and clerk of the district during that entire time. He has watched with interest the wonderful development of this region during his residence here and has always borne his part in its upbuilding and advancement."

There is another biography on Orlin Converse in the 1888 Livingston County History Book available on line.

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