Summary

Henry Albert "Hank" Bauer (July 31, 1922 – February 9, 2007) was an American right fielder and manager in Major League Baseball. He played with the New York Yankees (1948–1959) and Kansas City Athletics (1960–1961); he batted and threw right-handed. He served as the manager of the Athletics in both Kansas City (1961–62) and in Oakland (1969), as well as of the Baltimore Orioles (1964–68), becoming the winning manager of the 1966 World Series, four games to none, over the Los Angeles Dodgers

Birth:
31 Jul 1922 1
East St Louis IL 1
Death:
09 Feb 2007 1
Lenexa Kansas 1
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Henry Albert "Hank" Bauer
Henry Albert "Hank" Bauer
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Henry Albert "Hank" Bauer
Henry Albert "Hank" Bauer
Henry Albert "Hank" Bauer
Henry Albert "Hank" Bauer
Henry Albert "Hank" Bauer
Henry Albert "Hank" Bauer
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1966 World Series
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Full Name:
Henry Albert Bauer 1
Also known as:
Hank Bauer 1
Birth:
31 Jul 1922 1
East St Louis IL 1
Male 1
Death:
09 Feb 2007 1
Lenexa Kansas 1
Cause: Lung Cancer 1
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Religion:
Catholic 1
Race or Ethnicity:
Caucasian 1

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Stories

Hank Bauer, 84; won World Series as Yankees player, Orioles manager

Hank Bauer, the hard-nosed ex-Marine who returned to baseball after being wounded during World War II and went on to become a cornerstone of the New York Yankees dynasty of the 1950s, died Friday. He was 84.

Bauer died of cancer in Shawnee Mission, Kan., the Baltimore Orioles said. Bauer managed the 1966 Orioles to their first World Series title, a four-game sweep of the Dodgers.

A three-time All-Star outfielder, Bauer played on Yankees teams that won nine American League pennants and seven World Series in 10 years. He set the Series record with a 17-game hitting streak, a mark that still stands, starting in 1956 against the Brooklyn Dodgers and continuing in 1957 and '58 against the Milwaukee Braves.

Surrounded by such sluggers as Mickey Mantle and Yogi Berra, Bauer was a major ingredient in the Yankees' success during his years in New York from 1948 to 1959.

"I am truly heartbroken," Berra said in a statement issued by the Yankees. "Hank was a wonderful teammate and friend for so long. Nobody was more dedicated and proud to be a Yankee. He gave you everything he had."

Bauer played his last two seasons with the Kansas City Athletics, a team he managed from 1961 to 1962. He also managed Baltimore from 1964 to 1968 and the Athletics again in Oakland in 1969.

Bauer was voted the Associated Press American League Manager of the Year in 1964 and 1966, the only year he reached the Series as a manager.

A native of East St. Louis, Ill., Bauer was the youngest of nine children. He enlisted in the Marines shortly after Pearl Harbor and fought in a number of battles in the Pacific, including Okinawa and Guadalcanal, according to Hall of Fame archives. He earned two Bronze Stars and two Purple Hearts.

While on Okinawa, Bauer was hit in the left thigh by shrapnel. "We went in with 64, and six of us came out," he said.

Bauer batted .277 with 164 homers and 703 RBIs during his 14-year career. It was in the World Series that he excelled, from a Series-ending catch at his knees against the New York Giants in 1951 to his final Series appearance in 1958, when he hit .323 with four homers and eight RBIs as the Yankees beat the Braves in seven games.

"Maybe I bore down a lot more in the Series," Bauer said. "I had my luck. I had my good days and bad ones. I played for the right organization."

In 1959, Bauer was part of a seven-player trade with Kansas City that delivered a young Roger Maris to New York. Two years later, Maris set a season record with 61 homers, a mark that stood until 1998.

 

Bio

Henry Albert "Hank" Bauer (July 31, 1922 – February 9, 2007) was an American right fielder and manager in Major League Baseball. He played with the New York Yankees (19481959) and Kansas City Athletics (19601961); he batted and threw right-handed. He served as the manager of the Athletics in both Kansas City (1961–62) and in Oakland (1969), as well as of the Baltimore Orioles (1964–68), becoming the winning manager of the 1966 World Series, four games to none, over the Los Angeles Dodgers

Born in East St. Louis, Illinois as the youngest of nine children, Bauer was the son of an Austrian immigrant, a bartender who had earlier lost his leg in an aluminum mill. With little money coming into the home, Bauer was forced to wear clothes made out of old feed sacks, helping shape his hard-nosed approach to life. (It was said that his care-worn face "looked like a clenched fist".)

While playing baseball and basketball at East St. Louis Central Catholic High School, Bauer suffered permanent damage to his nose, which was caused by an errant elbow from an opponent. Upon graduation in 1941, he was repairing furnaces in a beer-bottling plant when his brother Herman, a minor league player in the Chicago White Sox system, was able to get him a tryout that resulted in a contract withOshkosh of the Class D Wisconsin State League.

One month after the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, Bauer enlisted in the U.S. Marine Corps. While serving in the Pacific Theater, Bauer contracted malaria on Guadalcanal, but he recovered from that well enough to earn 11 campaign ribbons, two Bronze Stars and two Purple Hearts (for being wounded in action) in 32 months of combat. Bauer was wounded his second time during the Battle of Okinawa, when he was a lieutenant in command of a platoon of 64 Marines. Only six of the 64 Marines survived the Japanese counterattack, and Bauer was wounded by shrapnel in his thigh. His wounds were severe enough to send him all the way back to the United States to recuperate.

Returning to East St. Louis, Bauer joined the local pipefitter's union, and he stopped by the local bar where his brother Joe Bauer worked. Danny Menendez, a scout for the New York Yankees, decided to sign him for a tryout with the Yankees' farm team in Quincy, Illinois. The terms of the contract were as follows: just $175 a month (with a $25 per month increase if he made the team) and a $250 bonus.

Batting .300 at Quincy and with the team's top minor league unit, the Kansas City Blues, Bauer eventually made his debut with the Yankees in September 1948.

n his 14-season Major League Baseball career, Bauer had a .277 batting average with 164 home runs and 703 runs batted in in 1,544games played. Bauer played on seven World Series-winning New York Yankees teams, and he holds the World Series record for the longest hitting streak (17 games). Perhaps Bauer's most notable performance came in the sixth and final game of the 1951 World Series, where he hit a three-run triple. He also saved the game with a diving catch of a line drive by Sal Yvars for the final out. At the close of the 1959 season, Bauer was traded to the Kansas City Athletics in the trade that brought them the future home run king Roger Maris (1961). This deal is often cited among the worst examples of the numerous trades between the Yankees and the Athletics during the late 1950s - trades that were nearly always one-sided in favor of the Yankees.

In 1961, the year Maris broke Babe Ruth's single-season home run record, Bauer, at 38 years of age was coming to the end of the line in his playing career. On June 19, Bauer was named as the playing-manager of the Athletics, and he retired from the baseball field one month later. In Bauer's first stint as the Athletic's manager - through the end of the 1962 season, the Athletics won 107 games and lost 157 (0.405), and his teams finished ninth in the ten-team American League twice.

After his firing at the close of the 1962 campaign, Bauer spent the 1963 season as first-base coach of the Baltimore Orioles. He was elevated to manager at the end of the season, as the Orioles sought a firmer hand in command of the team. The move was successful: Baltimore contended aggressively for the 1964 American League pennant, finishing third, and then — bolstered by the acquisition of the future Hall of Fame outfielder, Frank Robinson, its first AL pennant and World Series championship in 1966. However, when the Orioles, hampered by an injury to Robinson and major off-years by a number of regulars and pitchers, finished in the second division in 1967 and then fell far behind the eventual champion Detroit Tigers in 1968, Bauer was dismissed as the manager on July 12, in favor of Earl Weaver, then the Oriole's first-base coach.

Weaver proceeded to forge a Hall of Fame career over the next 14½ years as the Orioles' pilot.

Bauer then returned to the Athletics, now based in Oakland, for the 1969 campaign. He was fired for the second and final time by Finley after bringing Oakland home second in the new American League West Division. Overall, his regular-season managerial record was 594-544 (0.522).

Bauer managed the Tidewater Tides, the AAA affiliate of the New York Mets, in 1971–72. The Tides made the finals of IL Governors' Cup playoffs each season, winning the playoff title in the latter campaign.

Bauer then hung up his uniform, returning home to the Kansas City area, where he scouted for the Yankees and for the Kansas City Royals.

Bauer moved to the Kansas City area Prairie Village, Kansas in 1949 after playing with the Blues of 1947 and 1948. While there, he met and later married Charlene Friede, the club's office secretary. She died in July 1999.

The family's children attended St. Ann's Grade School in Prairie Village, then Bishop Miege High School in Shawnee Mission.

Hank owned and managed a liquor store in Prairie Village for a number of years after retirement from baseball.

Bauer died in his home on February 9, 2007 at the age of 84 from lung cancer.[1].

 

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