Summary

Conflict Period:
World War II 1
Branch:
Army 1
Rank:
Tech Corporal 2
Birth:
25 Apr 1911 1
Kingsport, TN 3
Death:
28 Sep 1980 1
VA Hospital Kingsport, TN 3
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Personal Details

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Person:
Perry Hite 1
Also known as: Perry Slyvester Hite 2
Social Security Number: ***-**-6261 1
Birth:
25 Apr 1911 1
Kingsport, TN 3
Death:
28 Sep 1980 1
VA Hospital Kingsport, TN 3
Cause: Unknown 1
Burial:
30 Sep 1980 4
Moutain Home National Cemetery 4
Plot: Section X, Row 3, Site 18 2
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Marriage:
Opal Lillian McNew 3
04 Feb 1931 3
Kingsport, TN 3
Marriage:
02 Apr 1931 3
Kingsport, TN 3
Divorce Date: 1952 3
Spouse Death Date: 31 Dec 2009 3
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World War II 1

Branch:
Army 1
Rank:
Tech Corporal 2
Service End Date:
20 Apr 1946 3
Enlistment Date:
20 Apr 1944 1
Service Number:
34988155 2
Organization:
Army 1
Organization Code:
ARMY 1
Release Date:
20 Apr 1946 1
Rank:
Technician Fifth Grade 2
Service Start Date:
20 Apr 1944 3

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Stories

Perry was a medic in the 6th Army, Second Battalion, 163rd Regiment, 41st infantry, was part of the General MacArthur's Jungleer's which moved on the Pacific campaign to free the Philippines and then on to stage for the possible invasion of Japan.

Jolo was occupied by the Japanese during World War II. On April 2, 1945, the Second Battalion of the U.S. 163rd Regiment, 41st Division (formerly the Montana National Guard) landed at Sanga Sanga and Bongao in the Sulu Archipelago, halfway between the island of Borneo and the Philippines. A week later, the other two battalions of the regiment left Mindanao and landed at Jolo, where they began fighting their way up heavily defended Mount Daho, the highest point on the island. The Sultan of Jolo, Muhammad Janail Abirin the 2nd, leader of the archipelago's 300,000 Moslems, welcomed Col. William J. Moroney, commander of the 163rd, and promised to help rid the island of Japanese. In three weeks of combat the 163rd suffered 37 dead and 191 wounded. Approximately 2,600 Japanese troops were killed, and only 87 Japanese soldiers were captured or surrendered on Jolo. Local fighters killed many Japanese stragglers hiding in the jungle after the Imperial Army surrendered in August, 1945.[2]  " from Wiki"

From the back of a family photo to his mother:

1-16-1945 left San Francisco, 2-3-1945 in New Guinea, 2-15-1945 Howland, 2-15-1945 Leyte, 2-27-1945 Mindoro, 3-10-1945 Mvcaga and Jolo 4-11-1945 Jolo.  

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