Summary

Murphy was a highly decorated WWII soldier. After the war, he became an actor.

Conflict Period:
World War II 1
Birth:
20 Jun 1925 2
Death:
28 May 1971 3
Virginia 4
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Pictures & Records (18)

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Audie_Murphy_uniform_medals.jpg
Audie_Murphy_uniform_medals.jpg
Most decorated US soldier in WWII
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AudieMurphyAwarded.jpg
AudieMurphyAwarded.jpg
Wanda Hendrix & Audie Murphy
Wanda Hendrix & Audie Murphy
January 01, 1950, Photographer: Allan Grant
Audie Murphy Letter Page 1
Audie Murphy Letter Page 1
Detailed statement of Sergeant Elmer C. Brawley describing how on January 26, 1945, Second Lieutenant Audie L. Murphy, exposed himself to enemy fire to hold off an advancing enemy. Records of the Army Staff, 1903 - 2004; Record Group 319; National Archives. (ARC Identifier: 299776)
Audie Murphy Letter Page 2
Audie Murphy Letter Page 2
Detailed statement of Sergeant Elmer C. Brawley describing how on January 26, 1945, Second Lieutenant Audie L. Murphy, exposed himself to enemy fire to hold off an advancing enemy. Records of the Army Staff, 1903 - 2004; Record Group 319; National Archives. (ARC Identifier: 299776)
Audie Murphy Letter Page 3
Audie Murphy Letter Page 3
Detailed statement of Sergeant Elmer C. Brawley describing how on January 26, 1945, Second Lieutenant Audie L. Murphy, exposed himself to enemy fire to hold off an advancing enemy. Records of the Army Staff, 1903 - 2004; Record Group 319; National Archives. (ARC Identifier: 299776)
Bronze Star Medal
Bronze Star Medal
Silver Star
Silver Star
Legion of Merit
Legion of Merit
Distinguished Service Cross
Distinguished Service Cross
Page 67
Page 67
Unit History of post war life
Audie Murphy and Pamela Archer Murphy.jpg
Audie Murphy and Pamela Archer Murphy.jpg
Audie Leon Murphy
Audie Leon Murphy
Sheet 5B
Sheet 5B
Audie Murphy, c. 1961
Audie Murphy, c. 1961
Source: http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Audie_Murphy_Whispering_Smith_1961.JPG
Medal of Honor (Army).jpg
Medal of Honor (Army).jpg

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Personal Details

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Full Name:
Audie Leon Murphy 4
Full Name:
Audie Murphy 5
Birth:
20 Jun 1925 2
Birth:
20 Jun 1924 3
Hunt County, Texas 3
Male 3
Birth:
20 Jun 1924 5
Death:
28 May 1971 3
Virginia 3
Cause: Plane crash in the Appalachian Mountains, Virginia 3
Death:
May 1971 5
Burial:
Burial Place: Arlington National Cemetery, Washington, DC 6
Edit
Birth:
Mother: Josie Belle Killian 2
Father: Emmett Murphy 2
Marriage:
Pamela Archer 3
1951 3
To: 1971 3
Marriage:
Wanda Hendrix 3
1949 3
To: 1951 3
Edit

World War II 1

Rank:
Major 4
Component:
Reserve 4
Enlistment:
30 Jun 1942 7
Grade:
O4 4
Place of Enlistment:
Dallas, TX 4
Serial Number (Enlisted):
18083707 7
Serial Number (Officer, USAR/TXARNG):
O-1692509 7
Unit (WWII):
Company "B", 15th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Infantry Division 7
Unit 1 (TXARNG):
HHC, 1st Battalion, 141st Infantry Regiment, 36th Infantry Division 7
Unit 2 (TXARNG):
HHC, 2nd Battalion, 141st Infantry Regiment, 36th Infantry Division 7
Branch:
Infantry 4
Army Branch:
United States Army-Paratroopers 3
Entered Service:
30 Jun 1942 3
Place:
Dallas, Texas 3
Reassigned to inactive status:
21 Sep 1945 3
Edit
Occupation:
Soldier, author, actor 4
Army Ranks:
1st Lieutenant (AUS): 16 Feb 1945 7
2nd Lieutenant (AUS): 14 Oct 1944 7
Captain (TXARNG): 19 Oct 1950 7
Corporal: 15 Jul 1943 7
Major (TXARNG): 14 Feb 1956 7
Private: 30 Jun 1942 7
Private First Class: 07 May 1943 7
Sergeant: 13 Dec 1943 7
Staff Sergeant: 13 Jan 1944 7
Battle Honors:
Anzio 1944: 22 January - 24 May 1944 8
Ardennes-Alsace 1944-45: 16 December 1944 - 25 January 1945 8
Central Europe 1945: 22 March - 11 May 1945 8
Naples-Foggia 1943-44: 9 September 1943 - 21 January 1944 8
Rhineland 1944-45: 15 September 1944 - 21 March 1945 8
Rome-Arno 1944: 22 January - 9 September 1944 8
Sicily 1943: 9 July - 17 August 1943 8
Southern France 1944: 15 August - 14 September 1944 8
Tunisia 1942-43: 17 November 1942 - 13 May 1943 8
Children:
James Shannon Murphy: Born 1954 3
Terry Michael Murphy: Born 1952 3
Foreign Awards:
1: French Fourragere in Colors of the Croix de Guerre 3
2: French Legion of Honor, Grade of Chevalier 3
3: French Croix de Guerre With Silver Star 3
4: French Croix de Guerre with Palm 3
5: Medal of Liberated France 3
6: Belgian Croix de Guerre 1940 Palm 3
Medal of Honor Recipient:
Date: 26 Jan 1945 9
Date Awarded: 09 Aug 1945 9
G.O. No.: 65 9
Organization: U.S. Army, Company B 1 5th Infantry, 3rd Infantry Division 9
Place: Holtzwihr, France 9
Rank: Second Lieutenant 9
Medals Awarded by U.S.:
1: Medal of Honor 3
10: American Campaign Medal 3
11: European-African-Middle Eastern Campaign Medal 3
12: World War II Victory Medal 3
13: Army of Occupation Medal with Germany Clasp 3
14: Armed Forces Reserve Medal 3
15: Combat Infantry Badge 3
16: Marksman Badge with Rifle Bar 3
17: Expert Badge with Bayonet Bar 3
2: Distinguished Service Cross 3
3: Silver Star with First Oak Leaf Cluster 3
4: Legion of Merit 3
5: Bronze Star Medal with "V" Device and First Oak Leaf Cluster 3
6: Purple Heart with Second Oak Leaf Cluster 3
7: U.S. Army Outstanding Civilian Service Medal 3
8: Good Conduct Medal 3
9: Presidential Unit Citation with First Oak Leaf Cluster 3
Movie Career:
Films: 44 3
Most popular films: “To Hell and Back,” “The Red Badge of Courage,” and “The Unforgiven.” 3
Social Security:
Social Security Number: ***-**-6632 5
Writing Career:
Autobiography: To Hell and Back 6
Published: 1949 6

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Medal of Honor Citation

AudieMurphyAwarded.jpg

2d Lt. Murphy commanded Company B, which was attacked by 6 tanks and waves of infantry. 2d Lt. Murphy ordered his men to withdraw to prepared positions in a wood, while he remained forward at his command post and continued to give fire directions to the artillery by telephone. Behind him, to his right, 1 of our tank destroyers received a direct hit and began to burn. Its crew withdrew to the woods. 2d Lt. Murphy continued to direct artillery fire which killed large numbers of the advancing enemy infantry. With the enemy tanks abreast of his position, 2d Lt. Murphy climbed on the burning tank destroyer, which was in danger of blowing up at any moment, and employed its .50 caliber machinegun against the enemy. He was alone and exposed to German fire from 3 sides, but his deadly fire killed dozens of Germans and caused their infantry attack to waver. The enemy tanks, losing infantry support, began to fall back. For an hour the Germans tried every available weapon to eliminate 2d Lt. Murphy, but he continued to hold his position and wiped out a squad which was trying to creep up unnoticed on his right flank. Germans reached as close as 10 yards, only to be mowed down by his fire. He received a leg wound, but ignored it and continued the single-handed fight until his ammunition was exhausted. He then made his way to his company, refused medical attention, and organized the company in a counterattack which forced the Germans to withdraw. His directing of artillery fire wiped out many of the enemy; he killed or wounded about 50. 2d Lt. Murphy's indomitable courage and his refusal to give an inch of ground saved his company from possible encirclement and destruction, and enabled it to hold the woods which had been the enemy's objective.

http://www.medalofhonor.com/MedalOfHonorAudieLMurphy.htm

Added by Clio

Audie Murphy’s Post-Traumatic Stress

During Audie Murphy’s life after World War II, he suffered from Post-Traumatic Stress Syndrome (PTS). His struggles gave him depression and insomnia, so he began taking sleeping pills called Placidyl. He became addicted to the medication, like so many others did during the sixties. Once he hit his low point and realized his addiction, he locked himself in a motel room for a week while he suffered from drug withdrawals. After his battle with prescription drugs, he became an advocate for veterans. He spoke openly about his “Battle Fatigue,” the name for PTS in the sixties, and used his influence to help returning soldiers from Korea and especially Vietnam. He lobbied the government to study the effects of war on veterans and destroyed the taboo of post-war depression. Because Audie Murphy, a movie star and a war hero, came out openly about his problems dealing with the war, soldiers throughout the United States could be more honest about their experiences and seek help through proper channels instead of through drugs and alcohol. While Post-Traumatic Stress did not become an actual term until 1980, Audie’s work helped a generation of Vietnam veterans deal with the horrors of war in a new and more hopeful way.

 

Sources: http://www.audiemurphy.com/biograph/biograph_bw.htm

            http://www.netwellness.org/healthtopics/anxietya/ptstress.cfm

Added by Clio

“The true meaning of America, you ask? It's in a Texas rodeo, in a policeman's badge, in the sound of laughing children, in a political rally, in a newspaper... In all these things, and many more, you'll find America. In all these things, you'll find freedom. And freedom is what America means to the world. And to me.”--Audie Murphy

Added by Clio

Distinguished Service Cross Citation

Ramatuelle, France

Distinguished Service Cross

 

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to 1st Lieutenant (then Staff Sergeant) Audie Leon Murphy (ASN: 0-1692509), United States Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy while serving with Company B, 15th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division, in action against enemy forces on 15 August 1944, in the vicinity of Ramatuelle, France. Lieutenant Murphy landed near Ramatuelle, France, with the first wave of the assault infantry, at 0800 hours, 15 August 1944, until halted by intense machine gun and small arms fire from a boulder-covered hill to his front. Leaving his men in a covered position, he dashed forty yards through withering fire to a draw. Using this defiladed route, he went back toward the beaches, found a light machine gun squad and, returning up the rocky hill, placed the machine gun in position seventy-five yards in advance of his platoon. In the duel which ensued, Lieutenant Murphy silenced the enemy weapon, killed two of the crew and wounded a third. As he proceeded further up the draw, two Germans advanced toward him. Quickly destroying both of them, he dashed up the draw alone toward the enemy strongpoint, disregarding bullets which glanced off the rocks around him and hand grenades which exploded fifteen yards away. Closing in, he wounded two Germans with carbine fire, killed two more in a fierce, brief fire-fight, and forced the remaining five to surrender. His extraordinary heroism resulted in the capture of a fiercely contested enemy-held hill and the annihilation or capture of the entire enemy garrison. Lieutenant Murphy's intrepid actions, personal bravery and zealous devotion to duty exemplify the highest traditions of the military forces of the United States and reflect great credit upon himself, the 3d Infantry Division, and the United States Army.

General Orders No. 21 (1945), Headquarters, Seventh U.S. Army

 

Silver Star Citation

Cleurie Quarry, France

Silver Star

 

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant (Infantry) [then Staff Sergeant] Audie Leon Murphy (ASN: 0-1692509), United States Army, for gallantry in action against the enemy while serving with Company B, 15th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division. On the morning of 2 October 1944, near Cleurie Quarry, France, First Lieutenant Murphy inched his way over rugged, uneven terrain, toward an enemy machine gun which had surprised a group of officers on reconnaissance. Getting to within fifteen yards of the German gun, First Lieutenant Murphy stood up and, disregarding a burst of enemy fire delivered at such close range and which miraculously missed him, flung two hand grenades into the machine gun position, killing four Germans, wounding three more and destroying the position.

General Orders No. 66 (February 25, 1945), Headquarters, 3d Infantry Division

 

Silver Star (1st Oak Leaf Cluster) Citation

Le Tholy, France

Silver Star

 

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting a Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster in lieu of a Second Award of the Silver Star to First Lieutenant (Infantry) [then Staff Sergeant] Audie Leon Murphy (ASN: 0-1692509), United States Army, for gallantry in action against the enemy while serving with Company B, 15th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division. On the afternoon of 5 October 1944 near Le Tholy, France, First Lieutenant Murphy, carrying an SCR 536 radio, crawled fifty yards under severe enemy machine gun and rifle fire, to a point 200 yards from strongly entrenched enemy who had prevented further advance. Despite machine gun and rifle bullets that hit as close as a foot to him, First Lieutenant Murphy directed artillery fire upon enemy positions for an hour, killing fifteen Germans and inflicting approximately thirty-five additional casualties. His courage, audacity and accuracy enabled his company to advance and attain its objective.

General Orders No. 83 (March 3, 1945), Headquarters, 3d Infantry Division

 

Legion of Merit Citation

Italy & France

Legion of Merit

 

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, 20 July 1942, takes pleasure in presenting the Legion of Merit to First Lieutenant (Infantry) [then Staff Sergeant] Audie Leon Murphy (ASN: 0-1692509), United States Army, for exceptionally meritorious conduct in the performance of outstanding services in Italy and France, as Platoon Sergeant, Platoon Leader and Company Commander of Company B, 15th Infantry, 3rd Infantry Division, from 22 January 1944 to 18 February 1945. First Lieutenant Murphy has always carried out his missions, no matter how hazardous, with marked ability. He often assumed leadership of his platoon in the absence of sufficient commissioned personnel and so intelligently and courageously led his men that he was commissioned an officer during the French campaign and commanded his company in a superior manner during the obliteration of the Colmar Pocket. First Lieutenant Murphy's personal bravery, his skill in imparting his own knowledge of enemy tactics to his men, and his voluntary assumption of hazardous patrols and missions have benefited his unit to an immeasurable degree.

General Orders No. 100 (May 25, 1945), Headquarters, European Theater of Operations

Bronze Star Medal (Valor) Citation

Anzio, Italy

Bronze Star Medal

 

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Bronze Star Medal with Combat "V" to First Lieutenant (then Staff Sergeant) Audie Leon Murphy (ASN: 0-1692509), United States Army, for valorous conduct in action against the enemy. On the night of 2 March 1944, on the ANZIO BEACHHEAD in Italy, First Lieutenant Murphy crept 100 yards over flat, open terrain during a fire fight between his small patrol and a group of Germans, to a point 50 yards from a partly disabled enemy tank. Taking careful aim, he fired several rifle grenades at the tank, hitting and completely destroying it. Then, when a great many enemy machine guns in the sector opened up, he led his men through bullet swept area to safety.

General Orders No. 84 (March 4, 1945), Headquarters, 3d Infantry Division

Bronze Star Medal (1st Oak Leaf Cluster) Citation

European Theater of Operations

Bronze Star Medal

 

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting a Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster in lieu of a Second Award of the Bronze Star Medal with Combat "V" to First Lieutenant (then Staff Sergeant) Audie Leon Murphy (ASN: 0-1692509), United States Army, for exemplary conduct in ground combat against the armed enemy while assigned to the 15th Infantry Regiment, on or about 8 May 1944, as Staff Sergeant, European Theater of Operations.

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