Summary

Son of Joseph Chamberlain & Amy Strickland Taylor. Husband of Maria Vanderbilt.

Birth:
02 Feb 1760 1
Kingwood, Hunterdon Co., NJ 1
Death:
28 Feb 1819 1
Highland Twp., Adams Co., PA 1
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Personal Details

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Birth:
02 Feb 1760 1
Kingwood, Hunterdon Co., NJ 1
Male 1
Death:
28 Feb 1819 1
Highland Twp., Adams Co., PA 1
Burial:
Burial Place: Lower Marsh Crk. Presby. Cem., Gettysburg, Adams Co., PA 1
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Birth:
Mother: Amy Strickland Taylor 1
Father: Joseph Chamberlain 1
Marriage:
Maria Vanderbilt 1

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Sources

  1. Contributed by chambln

Stories

"Dr. Dady" (History and Directory of the Boroughs of Gettysburg, Oxford..., pp. 8-9.)

During the early settlement of this county, swindlers were as wide-awake and as successful as they are now-a-days, though quite of a different character, as little was then known of lightning rods and windmills. Rev. Dr. Dady, who came to this country with the Hessians during the revolution, lived in the "mountainous parts" of what is now Adams County. When the sacerdotal robes were no longer subservient to his avaricious views, he laid them aside and assumed the character of a physician. Clayton Chamberlain was a neighbor of Dr. Dady's. Rice Williams, a New Englander, and John Hall, a New Yorker, came to the house of Chamberlain in July, 1797. They told Chamberlain that his house was haunted and that he was born with spiritualistic gifts, and they would show him a spirit. In the evening, they went into a field, and Williams Drew a circle on the ground, after which they had several interviews with the spirit. Williams told him that the spirit knew of a treasure, which it was permitted to discover to eleven men, who must be "honest, religious and sensible, and neither horse jockeys nor Irishmen." Each candidate received a sealed paper, containing certain "power." On the night of the 18th of Aug., 1797, the following instructions for the committee were received from the spirit. "Go on, do right, and prosper, and the treasure shall be yours. *   *   Take care of your 'powers' in the name and fear of God, our protector; if not, leave the work. There is a great treasure--4,000 pounds apiece for you." In consequence of these directions, Abraham Kephart waited on Dr. Dady, by order of the committee, and paid him $36 and 3 bushels of oats for 3 ounces of his "eliximer." Yost Liner gave the doctor $121 for 11 ounces of the stuff. The company soon increased to thirty members, all of whom were miserably duped by the wily doctor. This gang of swindlers was prosecuted, and found guilty of "cheating and defrauding by means of pretended spirits, certain circles, brown powder, and other compositions called mineral eliximer." The doctor was fined ninety dollars, and sentenced to two years confinement in the penitentiary.

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