Summary

Conflict Period:
Vietnam War 1
Branch:
Marine Corps 1
Rank:
L/Cpl 1
Birth:
25 Apr 1948 1
Pickens, South Carolina 1
Death:
04 Mar 2013 1
Prosperity, South Carolina 1
More…

Related Pages

Connect me or another page to Kenneth Young Hamm?

+
View more similar pages

Pictures & Records (1)

Add Show More

Personal Details

Edit
Birth:
25 Apr 1948 1
Pickens, South Carolina 1
Female 1
Birth:
01 Jan 1942 1
Newberry, South Carolina 1
Male 1
Death:
04 Mar 2013 1
Prosperity, South Carolina 1
Cause: Cancer from Agent Orange Exposure 1
Edit
Birth:
Mother: Minnie Massingale Stamey 1
Father: Grady Alexander 1
Birth:
Mother: Dovie (Evans) Hamm 1
Father: Harvey Young Hamm 1
Marriage:
Linda Essie (Alexander) Hamm 1
1970 1
New Berry, South Carolina 1
Spouse Death Date: 25 Aug 2007 1
Edit

Vietnam War 1

Branch:
Marine Corps 1
Rank:
L/Cpl 1

Looking for more information about Kenneth Young Hamm?

Search through millions of records to find out more.

Sources

  1. Contributed by edelstan732
Add

Stories

Charlie Battery Truck Driver 1967-1968

Kenny served in Charlie Battery, 1st Battalion, 12th Marines, 3rd Marine Division from 1967 to 1968. Charlie Battery had six towed 105 MM artillery howitzers. Kenny drove a duce and a half truck which he pulled a howitzer and made ammo runs every day and some times at night to keep the guns supplied with the rounds they needed.
Kenny was in many operations across the northern part of Vietnam DMZ area often called Leather Neck Square. Kenny was in the first artillery battle with the North Vietnamese Army which lasted for nine hours, a total of 1800 rounds landed in Charlie Battery area.
Kenny was well liked by his brother Marines, he looked after ever one like a father. He was often called Pop. I was the Motor Pool Sergeant but Kenny kept the men in line, always doing the dangerous runs himself even when he had a short time left on his tour. I often rode with Kenny as his ShotGun, we did not get much sleep and Kenny would tell me to take a nap while he drove. He was always looking out for me. When we got our rations of beer and soda,(two each per day), I always swapped my beer to Kenny for his sodas.
It was a great honor to have served with Kenny, and to have kept in touch the many years after Vietnam. Kenny was more than a Brother, He was a part of my life, He will be greatly missed, but never forgotton.
Semper Fi Brother Kenny

Sergeant Ed Elstan U.S.M.C.

About this Memorial Page

×