Summary

Frank P Stryker, son of Julius B B Stryker, Sr. and his wife Mary from Doylestown, PA.

Birth:
04 Jul 2014 1
Lansdale, PA 1
Death:
14 Apr 2014 1
Germany 1
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Birth:
04 Jul 2014 1
Lansdale, PA 1
Male 1
Death:
14 Apr 2014 1
Germany 1
Cause: KIA 1
Residence:
Place: Doylestown, PA 1
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Birth:
Mother: Mary Higgins Stryker 1
Father: Julius B B Stryker, Sr. 1

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Capt. Frank P Stryker, KIA 1945

Germany

Captain FRank P Stryker

Frank P. Stryker

  ID: O-417386
Entered the Service From: Pennsylvania
Rank: Captain

Service: U.S. Army, 41st Infantry Battalion, 2nd Armored Division

Died: Saturday, April 14, 1945
Buried at: Netherlands American Cemetery
Location: Margraten, Netherlands
Plot: D Row: 5 Grave: 23

Awards: Silver Star, Bronze Star with Oak Leaf Cluster

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

From the Doylestown Daily Intelligencer, Week of Aug. 12-18, 1945

Doylestown celebrates end of war -

[Editor's note - In a national radio broadcast at 7 p.m. Tuesday, Aug. 14, 1945, President Harry Truman announced that Japan had accepted the Allied terms of unconditional surrender, ending the fighting in World War II. The news set off spontaneous public celebrations that continued into Wednesday, known as V-J Day.]

Doylestown, like other communities throughout the world, exploded with emotions at 7 o'clock last night when President Truman's announcement of the Japanese surrender was flashed to the world by radio.

Almost simultaneously, the victory roar spread over town. Restraint was thrown to the winds.

Nearly all of Doylestown tried to get inside the Court House to take part in a brief service of thanksgiving in which local clergymen participated.

Big crowds in Monument Square tossed hats, boxes and flags in the air. Firecrackers that had been hidden in local cellars and attics for years were pressed into service. The streets were soon well filled with confetti and bits of torn newspapers.

There were no strangers in Doylestown last night--men and women embraced. Some were hilarious, others cried softly.

The fire siren on the roof of the Doylestown Fire House was worked overtime last night. For hours it sounded the official signal that the war was over. At least a hundred youngsters rode on the fire trucks, and the impromptu street parade started. Hundreds of automobiles were in line.

Through the courtesy of the Rohde Radio Service, a complete radio broadcasting set was set up on the second floor of the Daily Intelligencer office. Music and I.N.S. [International News Service] and radio flashes were furnished to the celebrants in Monument Square.

"Peace" posters were plastered on the windows in the central business section of town. Local inns and tap rooms closed immediately upon receipt of the "War's Over" signal and will remain closed until further notice from the State Liquor Control Board.

Doylestown police made one arrest during the evening, when William Kling of Doylestown, an ex-soldier, was arrested for driving while drunk on Main street. He was committed to the Bucks County Prison for a hearing. Aside from that, local police had very little to do except direct traffic.

 

Twenty-one Doylestown residents killed in war -

Doylestown's price for World War II included twenty men and one woman who made the supreme sacrifice, and another 700 who served their country, many of whom are still in the service, and a number of whom are wearing the Purple Heart.

Doylestown's few industrial plants produced millions of dollars' worth of material used in the war, principally gun barrels, uniforms, cloth and stockings. This [Wednesday] morning, for the first time since the war started, the plants are closed as employees are enjoying two well-earned holidays.

The end of the war will not mean that Doylestown's war plants will be closed. They will, instead, return to the production of civilian goods in quantities larger than ever before.

Doylestown's war dead are listed in the order in which they were killed:

No. 1--Lieut. Charles F. Meyers, 23; killed Dec. 5, 1942, in test flight in California.

No. 2--Carpenter's Mate Harrison Y. Stover, 24; killed Feb. 7, 1943, dying of exposure near Iceland.

No. 3--Seaman 2/c Kenneth R. Bellerby, 19; killed Nov. 14, 1943, in an accident aboard the Cruiser Boston.

No. 4--Staff Sergeant Harry Leon Gerhart, 26; killed Dec. 19, 1943, in Algeria, with the Air Corps.

No. 5--Pfc. Frank W. Walton, Jr., 20; killed Feb. 24, 1944, in Central Pacific.

No. 6--Staff Sergeant George B. McLaughlin, 26; killed April 28, 1944, in raid over France.

No. 7--Lieut. Donald V. Chubb, 22; killed May 8, 1944, when he crashed into the English Channel.

No. 8--Lieut. Mary Chubb, 31; killed June 14, 1944, in plane crash over England.

No. 9--Technical Corporal Harvey W. Price, 35; killed Aug. 3, 1944, in a truck accident in England.

No. 10--Lieut. Donald M. Myers, 23; killed Dec. 2, 1944, in France.

No. 11--Technical Sergeant John E. Miller, 29; killed Jan. 2, 1945, in mission over Philippine Islands.

No. 12--Pvt. George DeHaven, 24; killed Jan. 9, 1945, in France.

No. 13--Corporal C. Raymond Axenroth, Jr., 26; killed Feb. 21, 1945, on Iwo Jima, with the Marines.

No. 14--Lieut. Samuel E. Kershaw, 23; killed Feb. 21, 1945, in raid over European area.

No. 15--Pvt. Gordon B. Kreutz, 18; killed Feb. 23, 1945, in Germany.

No. 16--Pfc. William Darrah, 22; killed Feb. 27, 1945, on Iwo Jima, with the Marines.

No. 17--Lieut. Jack E. Taifer, 22; killed April 5, 1945, in England.

No. 18--Captain Frank P. Stryker, 29; killed April 14, 1945, somewhere in Germany.

No. 19--Pfc. Eugene C. Carter, 31; killed April 18, 1945, in action in Germany.

No. 20--Pvt. William J. McConnell, 19; killed May 9, 1945, on Okinawa.

No. 21--Lieut. William Satterthwaite [no age given]; killed May 15, 1945, on Okinawa, with the Marines.

[Editor's note - In 1946, the Veterans Land Improvement Company began development of the Maplewood neighborhood on a former farm along Route 313. The streets were named after 11 of Doylestown's service members killed in the war, including siblings Donald and Mary Chubb.]

 

Barbi Ennis Connolly PRINCESSBARBI_B25@msn.com

Capt. Frank P Stryker, KIA April, 1945 -Germany

Germany

Frank Stryker lived in Lansdale before the Family moved to Doylestown, PA.  His father Julius B B Stryker, Sr. invented a "glue" and had a manufacturing plant in Lansdale.  The FAMILY moved to the "Windemere" Residence in 1928, at 181 East Court Street, Doylestown,  Bucks County, Pa.

Birth: Jul. 4, 1915 Death:

Apr. 14, 1945

CAPT Frank P. Stryker ID: O-417386
Branch of Service: U.S. Army
Hometown: Bucks County, PA
Status: KIA

Frank P. Stryker    ID: O-417386
Entered the Service From: Pennsylvania
Rank: Captain

Service: U.S. Army, 41st Infantry Battalion, 2nd Armored Division

Died: Saturday, April 14, 1945
Buried at: Netherlands American Cemetery
Location: Margraten, Netherlands
Plot: D Row: 5 Grave: 23

Awards: Silver Star, Bronze Star with Oak Leaf Cluster

From the Doylestown Daily Intelligencer, Week of Aug. 12-18, 1945

Doylestown celebrates end of war -

[Editor's note - In a national radio broadcast at 7 p.m. Tuesday, Aug. 14, 1945, President Harry Truman announced that Japan had accepted the Allied terms of unconditional surrender, ending the fighting in World War II. The news set off spontaneous public celebrations that continued into Wednesday, known as V-J Day.]

Doylestown, like other communities throughout the world, exploded with emotions at 7 o'clock last night when President Truman's announcement of the Japanese surrender was flashed to the world by radio.

Almost simultaneously, the victory roar spread over town. Restraint was thrown to the winds.

Nearly all of Doylestown tried to get inside the Court House to take part in a brief service of thanksgiving in which local clergymen participated.

Big crowds in Monument Square tossed hats, boxes and flags in the air. Firecrackers that had been hidden in local cellars and attics for years were pressed into service. The streets were soon well filled with confetti and bits of torn newspapers.

There were no strangers in Doylestown last night--men and women embraced. Some were hilarious, others cried softly.

The fire siren on the roof of the Doylestown Fire House was worked overtime last night. For hours it sounded the official signal that the war was over. At least a hundred youngsters rode on the fire trucks, and the impromptu street parade started. Hundreds of automobiles were in line.

Through the courtesy of the Rohde Radio Service, a complete radio broadcasting set was set up on the second floor of the Daily Intelligencer office. Music and I.N.S. [International News Service] and radio flashes were furnished to the celebrants in Monument Square.

"Peace" posters were plastered on the windows in the central business section of town. Local inns and tap rooms closed immediately upon receipt of the "War's Over" signal and will remain closed until further notice from the State Liquor Control Board.

Doylestown police made one arrest during the evening, when William Kling of Doylestown, an ex-soldier, was arrested for driving while drunk on Main street. He was committed to the Bucks County Prison for a hearing. Aside from that, local police had very little to do except direct traffic.

 

Twenty-one Doylestown residents killed in war -

Doylestown's price for World War II included twenty men and one woman who made the supreme sacrifice, and another 700 who served their country, many of whom are still in the service, and a number of whom are wearing the Purple Heart.

Doylestown's few industrial plants produced millions of dollars' worth of material used in the war, principally gun barrels, uniforms, cloth and stockings. This [Wednesday] morning, for the first time since the war started, the plants are closed as employees are enjoying two well-earned holidays.

The end of the war will not mean that Doylestown's war plants will be closed. They will, instead, return to the production of civilian goods in quantities larger than ever before.

Doylestown's war dead are listed in the order in which they were killed:

No. 1--Lieut. Charles F. Meyers, 23; killed Dec. 5, 1942, in test flight in California.

No. 2--Carpenter's Mate Harrison Y. Stover, 24; killed Feb. 7, 1943, dying of exposure near Iceland.

No. 3--Seaman 2/c Kenneth R. Bellerby, 19; killed Nov. 14, 1943, in an accident aboard the Cruiser Boston.

No. 4--Staff Sergeant Harry Leon Gerhart, 26; killed Dec. 19, 1943, in Algeria, with the Air Corps.

No. 5--Pfc. Frank W. Walton, Jr., 20; killed Feb. 24, 1944, in Central Pacific.

No. 6--Staff Sergeant George B. McLaughlin, 26; killed April 28, 1944, in raid over France.

No. 7--Lieut. Donald V. Chubb, 22; killed May 8, 1944, when he crashed into the English Channel.

No. 8--Lieut. Mary Chubb, 31; killed June 14, 1944, in plane crash over England.

No. 9--Technical Corporal Harvey W. Price, 35; killed Aug. 3, 1944, in a truck accident in England.

No. 10--Lieut. Donald M. Myers, 23; killed Dec. 2, 1944, in France.

No. 11--Technical Sergeant John E. Miller, 29; killed Jan. 2, 1945, in mission over Philippine Islands.

No. 12--Pvt. George DeHaven, 24; killed Jan. 9, 1945, in France.

No. 13--Corporal C. Raymond Axenroth, Jr., 26; killed Feb. 21, 1945, on Iwo Jima, with the Marines.

No. 14--Lieut. Samuel E. Kershaw, 23; killed Feb. 21, 1945, in raid over European area.

No. 15--Pvt. Gordon B. Kreutz, 18; killed Feb. 23, 1945, in Germany.

No. 16--Pfc. William Darrah, 22; killed Feb. 27, 1945, on Iwo Jima, with the Marines.

No. 17--Lieut. Jack E. Taifer, 22; killed April 5, 1945, in England.

No. 18--Captain Frank P. Stryker, 29; killed April 14, 1945, somewhere in Germany.

No. 19--Pfc. Eugene C. Carter, 31; killed April 18, 1945, in action in Germany.

No. 20--Pvt. William J. McConnell, 19; killed May 9, 1945, on Okinawa.

No. 21--Lieut. William Satterthwaite [no age given]; killed May 15, 1945, on Okinawa, with the Marines.

[Editor's note - In 1946, the Veterans Land Improvement Company began development of the Maplewood neighborhood on a former farm along Route 313. The streets were named after 11 of Doylestown's service members killed in the war, including siblings Donald and Mary Chubb.]

 Barbi Ennis Connolly  PRINCESSBARBI_B25@msn.com

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