Summary

Conflict Period:
Civil War (Union) 1
Branch:
Army 1
Rank:
Corporal 1
Birth:
24 Nov 1842 1
Milan Township, Dutchess County, New York 1
Death:
07 Jan 1911 1
Pine Plains, New York 1
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Personal Details

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Birth:
24 Nov 1842 1
Milan Township, Dutchess County, New York 1
Male 1
Death:
07 Jan 1911 1
Pine Plains, New York 1
Cause: apoplexy 1
Burial:
Burial Place: Pine Plains, New York - Evergreen Cemetery 1
Residence:
Place: Pine Plains, New York 1
From: 1880 1
To: 1911 1
Residence:
Place: Milan Township, Dutchess County, New York 1
From: 1842 1
To: 1860 1
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Birth:
Mother: Sarah Hicks 1
Father: Otis Bowman 1
Marriage:
Eliza Weaver 1
15 Aug 1900 1
Poughkeepsie, New York 1
Spouse Death Date: 21 Aug 1941 1
Marriage:
Julia E. Thorne 1
04 Jul 1866 1
Spouse Death Date: 03 Nov 1891 1
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Civil War (Union) 1

Branch:
Army 1
Rank:
Corporal 1
Service Start Date:
Aug 1862 1
Service End Date:
12 Jul 1865 1
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Military Unit:
Co. C, 128th New York State Volunteer Infantry 1

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Stories

Obituary of Jacob S. Bowman

Pine Plains, New York

The Pine Plains Register
Friday, January 13, 1911, Front Page


DEATH OF J. S. BOWMAN
----------
Stricken with Apoplexy at his home last Saturday Evening
----------

The community was greatly shocked Saturday evening by the announcement of the death of Jacob S. Bowman.  Mr. Bowman had for a while been suffering from neuralgia of the heart, but had entirely recovered and was sitting in a chair at his home when he suddenly expired from a stroke of apoplexy.  He had remarked to his son, who was at the house but a few moments before, that he had never felt in better health since his confinement to the house.  Mr. Bowman attended the annual Christmas supper at the home of his son, Wilber, on Christmas eve, which had been their custom for years, and on the Tuesday following he was taken with neuralgia pains, and was confined to his home, but not to his bed.  His illness was not considered serious, and his sudden death was a sad blow to his relatives and the people of Pine Plains.  Deceased was 68 years old.

Jacob Stall Bowman was a descendant of the Bowermans who came from New Bedford, Ct., to the town of Dover in this county about 1780, and from there to Milan about 1790.  There were three brothers, Maltiah, Silas, and Macy, and their father and sisters in this first emigration.  Maltiah settled at Lafayette and built a dwelling on the corner where now is the hotel; Macy settled on the Rowland Story farm, and Silas emigrated to Doanesburgh, near Albany, where he died.  Maltiah is the ancestor of the Milan families of that name.  He had three sons, Joseph, Otis Eseck, and Sands.  Otis E., a surveyor and for twenty years a lawyer, was the father of Jacob S. Bowman.  His mother was Sarah Hicks.  Mr. Bowman was born at Lafayetteville in the town of Milan, November 24, 1842.  In early life he learned the trade of mason and builder, and was one of the most skilled artisans in his line.

Among those who studied law with his father Otis, was Captain Thomas N. Davis, who later married one of his daughters.  The law office was situated in front of the house near the roadway, but has since been removed to another part of the property.

In August, 1862, when about seventeen years of age, he enlisted in Company C, 128th Regiment, N. Y. S. Vols., Thomas N. Davis, Captain and served as corporal all through the war.  For a time he was detailed to field hospital duty, and later returned to his regiment.  He participated in the many and hard battles of that company, and at the close of the war was honorably discharged with that company at Albany.

At the close of the war he returned to his native place, Milan, and in 1866 married Julia Thorn, of the town of Pine Plains. His wife died in 1891.

A few years after his marriage he removed to Bangall, and later to Pine Plains and built the Lasher house which he sold before it was completed.  He purchased the present homestead site on which at that time was an old house.  He sold the building and erected the building in which he passed his remaining years.

In 1876 he purchased the store property of Philip Piester, and later remodeled the building to its present condition.  He continued in the drug business until his death, having taken his son, Wilber J. Bowman, as a partner not long ago.

Mr. Bowman was twice married.  His first wife was Julia Thorn, who died about twenty years ago, leaving two children, Wilber J Bowman, the well known druggist, and Mrs. Fred S. Barrett.  His second wife was Miss Eliza Weaver, who is still living.  Besides the wife, the two children and several grandchildren, he leaves two sisters, Mrs. Thomas N. Davis and Mrs. P R Seeley, the latter the mother of William H Seeley, General  Passenger Agent of the Central New England railroad.

No man in Pine Plains will be more greatly missed, for he was a leading figure in all that made for the advancement of the village and town.  He served his town as supervisor, town clerk, and was postmaster under the first term of the late President Cleveland.  A few years ago he erected the opera house.

Mr. Bowman's charity was without ostentation, and many a kind deed was done by him, only those receiving his aid knowing from whom it came.

THE FUNERAL

Seldom has a more deep cloud of sorrow overshadowed a community in consequence of the death of a citizen than was manifested on Tuesday on the occasion of the funeral obsequies of the late Jacob S. Bowman.  As a mark of respect to the deceased the principal places of business were closed during the funeral hour, and the village wore an air of mourning.

The religious services were at Mr. Bowman's late home, which was  thronged with relatives and other friends, including the members of the Masonic fraternity.

The remains rested in a couch casket, the face ot the dead citizen having a peaceful expression suggestive rather of rest and repose than of the embrace of the grim destroyer.

The prayer book service of the Episcopal Church was read by Rev. Samuel A. Weikert, of, St. Mark's Church, Paterson, N. J., formerly rector of the Episcopal Church at Pine Plains, and late rector of Christ Church, Pokeepsie (sic.), who also made a brief address, paying a fitting tribute, as far as words could express it, to the noble characteristics of the deceased, which had endeared him to the public as well as to those with whom he was more intimately connected.  At the grave in Evergreen  Cemetery the impressive Masonic burial service was conducted by Worshipful W. E P. Hewitt as master, with Rev. S. A. Weikert acting chaplain.

Worshipful C. S. Wilber made the address, which was most impressive though it was with difficulty that Mr. Wilber could control his voice while the sorrowing assemblage expressed their grief in tears.

The bearers were members of the Masonic Brotherhood:  Theodore Engelke, Frank Barton, Frank E. Chase, A. D Barton, Clifton Robinson, Fred Sadler, John Hapeman and Charles E. Brown.

The hymns "Jesus, Lover of My Soul," and "Asleep in Jesus," were finely sung by a quartet choir, both hymns being favorites of Mr. Bowman.

The floral testimonials were many and beautiful, the principal ones being a bouquet of carnations from wife; pillow and lyre from children; cross from grandchildren; broken column from Stissing Masonic Lodge; wreath from Mr. and Mrs. S. Hoag; bouquets from Mr. and Mrs. Ray Ostrom, L . H. Rollins, Mr. and Mrs A. Haight; wreath from Silas Hinkley and J . W.  Hinkley, Jr.; bouquet of violets from Irving Haight; wreath from John H. Cusack; bouquet of lilies from Dr. and Mrs. W. E. P. Hewitt; bouquets of pinks from M. H. Decker and daughter, Mr. and Mrs. N Kilmer, Mr. and Mrs. J. L. Thompson, Mr. and Mrs. G. H. Ricketts, Mr. and Mrs. Charles Kupperman; bouquet of violets from Mr and Mrs. Frank Eno; wreath of lilies from Mr. and Mrs. P. C. Ketterer; wreath of lilies from Mr. and Mrs. Edward Lasher; bouquet of pinks from Miss Louisa Weaver; bouquet of piiiks from Mr. and Mrs. Harry Harris and Seymour Beckwith; bouquet of pinks from Mr. and Mrs. Edward Sadler.

Many prominent visitors attended the funeral, among them Hon. R. E. Connell and Harry Harris, of Pokeepsie (sic.); Seymour Beckwith, of New York, and members of the order of Free Masons from neighboring lodges, also Mr. and Mrs. Henry Clark and daughter, Mrs. Atherton, of Norfolk; William H. Seeley and Miss Owens, of Hartford.

Life's work well done,
Life's race well run,
Life's victory won --
Now cometh rest.

 

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