Summary

Revolutionary War - Delaware Militia

Birth:
25 Mar 1754 1
Lewes, Colony of Delaware 1
Death:
02 Dec 1802 1
Lewes, Sussex County, Delaware 1
Conflict Period:
Revolutionary War 1
Branch:
Militia 1
Rank:
private 1
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Birth:
25 Mar 1754 1
Lewes, Colony of Delaware 1
Male 1
Death:
02 Dec 1802 1
Lewes, Sussex County, Delaware 1
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Marriage:
Tabitha 1
abt 1773 1
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Revolutionary War 1

Branch:
Militia 1
Rank:
private 1

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Some payroll and uniform  issue records list Camp Middlebrook (New Jersey) May, June 1779; Wicks Farms (New Jersey) Feb 10, 1780); Christiana Bridge (Delaware) April-May 1780 and Hillsborough (North Carolina) July-September 1780 where he was listed as "Missing in Action".

One record lists him being wounded twice. The first time was at Synepuxon (sic), Maryland in May of 1777. 

The second time was at the battle of Camden, South Carolina, August 16, 1780.

Wounds were to the eyes (from flash of a gun) and right arm.

Declared an invalid pensioner, his pension commenced January 25, 1783 at the rate of 1 pound 17 shillings and 6 pence per month. in 1791 his age was listed as 37.

After being pensioned he resided in Broad Creek Hundred, Sussex County, Delaware.

 

Middlebrook Encampment

Bound Brook, New Jersey

Middlebrook, New Jersey. Middlebrook? Can't find it on the map? Its not there. It has been absorbed by the town of Bound Brook. It was a small village north west of Bound Brook, about where Thompson Avenue and Route 28 meet. The encampment was north of the village, around the gap into the hills which Chimney Rock Road runs through. Today it is just east of the junction of Routes 22 and 287.

The Main army, consisting of the Virginia, Maryland, and Pennsylvania Brigades, with the Delaware regiment, the artillery Corps, and the artisans and attached support units, were along the base of the Watchung Mountains. Here they were protected from some of the weather, had a good supply of trees for construction and firewood, and were supported by a generally patriotic population, with an active militia.

Only tools and boards for the bunk beds were provided, and a very few expensive nails. There was no glass for windows, or iron for hinges. They built along the lower slopes, using the wooded hills as their supply depot. Each hut was 16X14 and had walls 7 foot tall. The tools they needed were issued by the Quartermaster Department. Deputy Quartermaster Jacob Weiss made frequent requests from Middlebrook for tools, including this request on Deck.16th:

Broad Axes, Adzes Claw or Carpenter's Hammers, 12 or 15 Cross cut Saws with cross cut and Hand Saw Files and also Saw Setts, 10 or 12 Saddles with the prices or distinguishing whose Merchandize, About 2 Tun Barr Iron as wrote for including that for Mr. How, 10 or 12 Barrs Steel suitable for new Steeling Axes &c.-And a good Stove with pipes agreeable to dimensionsWashington had standardized the hut size as 16 feet by 14 feet, with 7 foot tall walls and a peaked roof, with one fire place and chimney.

Dr. James Thatcher described the Middlebrook encampment like this:

"February 3/.-Having continued to live under cover of canvas-tents most of the winter, we have suffered extremely from exposure to cold and storms. Our soldiers have been employed six or eight weeks in constructing log huts, which at length are completed, and both officers and soldiers are now under comfortable covering for the remainder of the winter. Log houses are constructed with the trunks of trees cut into various lengths, according to the size intended, and are firmly connected by notches cut at their extremities in the manner of dovetailing. The vacancies between the logs are filled in with plastering consisting of mud and clay. The roof is formed of similar pieces of timber, and covered with hewn slabs. The chimney, situated at one end of the house, is made of similar but smaller timber, and both the inner and the outer side are covered with clay plaster, to defend the wood against the fire. The door and windows are formed by sawing away a part of the logs of a proper size, and move on wooden hinges. In this manner have our soldiers, without nails, and almost without tools, except the axe and saw, provided for their officers and for themselves comfortable and convenient quarters, with little or no expense to the public. The huts are arranged in strait lines, forming a regular, uniform, compact village. The officers' huts are situated in front of the line, according to their rank, the kitchens in the rear, and the whole is similar in form to a tent encampment. The ground for a considerable distance in front of the soldiers' line of huts is cleared of wood, stumps and rubbish, and is every morning swept clean for the purpose of a parade-ground and roll-call for the respective regiments. line officers' huts are in general divided into two apartments, and are occupied by three or four officers, who compose one mess. Those for the soldiers have but one room, and contain ten or twelve men, with their cabins placed one above another against the walls, and fitted with straw, and one blanket for each man."

Wick's Farms Encampment

Jockey Hollow - Morristown, New Jersey

The Wick farm is located in what is called Jockey Hollow, about four miles southwest of Morristown, New Jersey, near the intersection of Tempe Wick Road and Jockey Hollow Road. The farm became an important historical monument in the famous 1779-80 encampment of General George Washington and his troops there.

Nine hundred acres of Jockey Hollow timber, notched together and chinked with clay, made the army’s winter quarters – 12 soldiers in each of 1,000, 14’ x 16’ huts – where the men made do with a trickle of rations and beds of loose straw. A thousand soldiers deserted; but most remained. There was no great turning point reached here. A battle was waged here, however, to keep the Continental Army intact. If it had been lost, then Yorktown – the battle where the Continental Army gained final advantage in the War – would have a far different meaning in our lives.

To understand why its a great story, walk to the top of the hill in Jockey Hollow that held 200 soldier huts for the Pennsylvania Brigade. Walk up one day in January and imagine staying there until it gets warm enough sometime in April to take off your down jacket. Imagine standing there without your shoes on, without even one of the huts on top of the hill for retreat from the incessant cold. Try to conceive of something important enough to keep you on that hill for the rest of the winter. When you get home, imagine what it would be like if 13,000 ragged, homeless men with guns marched into your town. How would you feel if someone in your family caught small pox from the men and died? Would you have sympathy for the soldiers as they foraged in your barnyard, or for the General who headquartered on the other side of the village at Ford’s Mansion?

Ask most people what happened in Morristown during the American Revolution and they’ll undoubtedly mention Washington’s Headquarters. But the untold stories of thousands of Continental soldiers and a few hundred townspeople magnify the American legend at Morristown. Perhaps it is because there were no great battles at Morristown that historical texts often gloss over the events here and focus on more catastrophic circumstances such as those at Valley Forge. The Jockey Hollow encampment of 1779-80 endured a winter more severe, including seven blizzards in December alone, than that at Valley Forge, where thousands died. Yet only about a hundred soldiers at Morristown did not see the spring of 1780.

Battle of Camden

Camden, South Carolina

General Horatio Gates drew up his army with the regiments of the Continental Army on the right under Gist, Kalb’s 2nd Maryland and a Delaware regiment, his centre under Caswell of North Carolina militia and his right under Stevens of Virginia militia. Smallwood commanded the reserve of the 1st Maryland.

Gates ordered his left wing of militia to attack the opposing British units. As they began to move forward the British launched a counter attack along the whole line. Ill-trained and largely without bayonets with which to conduct close quarter fighting, the American militia retreated off the field leaving Webster’s regiments to turn on the flank of the American right wing where the Continental units were putting up a stiff fight and continued to do so for some time. Tarleton’s cavalry finally attacked the American right wing in the rear causing the units to break. The British cavalry pursued the retreating Americans for some twenty miles.

Gates, the American commander appears to have left the battlefield with the first of the militia and ridden a considerable distance before drawing rein, leaving his subordinate commanders to fight on with the right flank. His reputation was destroyed. Baron Von Kalb, a German in the American service, particularly distinguished himself before being killed.

Casualties: The British lost 324 killed and wounded, 100 being from the 33rd. The American casualties were 1,000 killed and wounded and 1,000 lost as prisoners. 7 guns were taken with all the American stores and baggage.

Wounded

Sinepuxent, Maryland

Research revealed Sinepuxent was near Berlin in Worcester County, Maryland — The American Colonists guarded Sinepuxent Inlet with militia during the Revolutionary War.

 

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