Summary

WWII Hero -Col. Commander, Command Pilot /PTO - 1915-1957

Conflict Period:
World War II 1
Branch:
Army Air Forces 1
Rank:
Colonel 1
Birth:
16 Oct 1915 1
Kansas City MO 1
Death:
01 Oct 1957 1
Bolling Field, VA 1
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Personal Details

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Full Name:
Leo Francis Paul 1
Also known as:
"Pat" Paul 1
Birth:
Male 1
Birth:
16 Oct 1915 1
Kansas City MO 1
Male 1
Death:
01 Oct 1957 1
Bolling Field, VA 1
Cause: C-47 Crash 1
Burial:
Burial Place: Arlington Nat. Cemetery 1
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Birth:
Mother: Catherine Carroll 1
Father: Elmer Paul 1
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World War II 1

Branch:
Army Air Forces 1
Rank:
Colonel 1
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Quote:
WWII AAC 1
Occupation:
Col. /Pilot 1
Race or Ethnicity:
White, Citizen 1
Category:
USAF Career 1

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USAF Col Leo F Paul

Bolling Field VA

Official Portrait for COL. Leo F Paul, USAF
4 images

Leo Francis "PAT" Paul was born in Iowa City, Iowa on 16 Oct. 1915 and died in a Transport C-47 Crash on 1 Oct. 1957. 

   Col Leo F Paul was a highly decorated WWII Veteran who served in seven Pacific Campaign Theatres.  209 Combat Missions, (706 Hours!) THREE Distinguished Flying Crosses, a Bronze Star, TWO Purple Hearts, an Air Medal. . . Fighter Pilot in the 5th Air Force.

  Col Paul was assigned to the Staff of the U.S. Air Force Chief of Staff.  Col Paul leaves his wife Mary Lou and two children, their son Larry and their daughter ____ .    *** Col. Paul's Decorations include THREE Distinguished Flying Crosses, the Bronze Star with the "V", Valor device, the Air Medal, TWO Purple Hearts. ***

The Bronze Star Medal (or BSV) with "V" for VALOR is a United States Armed Forces individual military decoration that was awarded to Major L."Pat" Paul for Meritorious Service, with the "V" for VALOR device for heroism. It is the fourth-highest combat award of the U.S. Armed Forces and the ninth highest military award (including both combat and non-combat awards) in the order of precedence of U.S. military decorations. Major Paul wears the Bronze Star with "V", the VALOR device, it is the United States military's fourth highst AWARD for Valor.  (Oct, through Dec.1944)

   The Distinguished Flying Cross;  "Distinguished Flying Cross" Heroism or Extraordinary Acheivement while Participating in Aerial Flight. (See description below) 

     Col "Pat" Paul was a graduate of the University of Iowa.

     Col Paul was from Iowa City, Iowa.   Col Paul died in a tragic accident while on a routine C-47 training flight in 1957.   The C-47 Crash was near Colesville MD.  The cause of ithe crash is unsure... (It is thought it was a problem with the gas lines and/or gas supply).  The other lost Officers were Col Willis F Bond and Capt. Wm O Rouse.

  Photo's and stories will be coming from his proud son Larry Paul.  19 Aug. 2011

***************************************  

"Barbara Ennis Connolly WWII Historical Researcher PRINCESSBARBI_B25@msn.com

And Patti Johnson, Historical Researcher and History Team Member. 19 Aug. 2011

Col Leo F Paul

Washington, DC

Col Leo F "Pat" Paul recieving his DFC.
3 images

WWII US Army Air Corp Command Pilot Leo F Paul ("Pat" to his friends) flew Combat Missions in the Pacific Theatre.  He engaged in seven Campaigns while serving in the Pacific. *** Col. Paul's Decorations include THREE Distinguished Flying Crosses, the Bronze Star with the "V", Valor device, the Air Medal, TWO Purple Hearts. ***

  What makes great men great?  Sometimes it is good timing...he was there when he was needed?  Yes, but it has to be way more than that.  Col Pat Paul had heart, dediation, will-power and courage.  Not just any Courage but 'Courage under fire'.  "Courage with Honor"  A Bronze Star with "V" for Valor.  One of a kind.  An honest and true Hero.  You can't make men like Col. Pat.  Oh, if we could?  He was born that way... with a gift.  The gift of love of man, love of country, HIS men, HIS Country, selfless and courageous beyond the normal, beyond amazing.

    Feared by the enemy, admired by all.  In the USAF article about Col Paul (Writtin by Col Henderson) Henderson said it like it was ... more than the loss of a life, more than the loss of a leader... it was the loss of a great man, a friend, husband and father.  Col Paul had amazing dedication and vision for the future...and guts.

   *Guts, grit and glory* but not for himself, he had that for his fellow airman, soldier and human being.  A tragic accident and more... THREE honorable men in one place.  A sad loss indeed.  The newspapers said "Highly decorated WWII Vet"... that barely scratches the surface.  America was priviledged to have had him and his family and friends were proud to call him "theirs".  Sometimes he looked stern (a lot), it was his focus, his desire to "Get it done" ... "Do it right" ... and do it NOW.  His men's lives were at stake.

   Then his smile, Col Paul's eyes smiled too.  True leadership has more than power.  Col Pat had tenderness and hope inside, no doubt he must have loved his family and friends as much as his God and Country.  We thank the Lord for such men, we are sad he was called Home too soon.  Col Pat Paul will be remembered for many-many accomplishments.  God Bless our Brave Men.  Barbi Ennis Connolly Oct.2011

 Air Force Magazine, 1957 Article titled "Death of a Colonel" by J.F. Loosbrock.  AND

"What is the Lead Time?" by  Lt. Col. F. D. Henderson, USAF Pat's Friend. 

  Colonel F. D. Henderson (USMA; M.A., George Washington University) is Deputy Assistant Chief of Staff, Studies and Analysis, Hq USAF. His overseas tours have been with fighter units in the Philippines and Okinawa in World War II, Japan, Korea, AirCent (Europe), and Vietnam. A graduate of the Air War College, Colonel Henderson has been Aide to the Chief of Staff, USAF, and Vice Commandant, Air Force Academy.

Major Leo F "Pat" Paul

Pacific Theatre - Japan

Col Leo F "PAT" Paul - Arlington Cemetery
3 images

DFC with the "V" for VALOR;

"Distinguished Flying Cross" Heroism or Extraordinary Acheivement while Participating in Aerial Flight;  The Bronze Star Medal (or BSV) with "V" for VALOR is a United States Armed Forces individual military decoration that was awarded to Major L."Pat" Paul for Meritorious Service, with the "V" for VALOR device for heroism. It is the fourth-highest combat award of the U.S. Armed Forces and the ninth highest military award (including both combat and non-combat awards) in the order of precedence of U.S. military decorations.

The Distinguished Flying Cross was designed by Elizabeth Will and Arthur E. Dubois both working at the Army’s Institute of Heraldry. It is a bronze cross pattee, with rays between the arms of the cross. On the obverse is a propeller of four blades, with one blade in each arm of the cross and in the re-entrant angles of the cross are rays which form a square. The cross is suspended by a rectangular-shaped bar and centered on this is a plain shield. The reverse is blank and suitable for engraving the recipient’s name and rank.
*** The ribbon has a narrow red center stripe, flanked on either side by a thin white stripe, a wide stripe of dark blue, a narrow white stripe and narrow dark blue at the edge of the ribbon.
*** The cross symbolizes sacrifice, and the propeller symbolizes flight. The combination of those symbols makes clear that the DFC is an award for heroism or achievement for individuals involved in aviation. The ribbon reflects the national colors.
Subsequent awards of the Distinguished Flying Cross are indicated by oak-leaf clusters for Army and Air Force personnel. In World War I, aircraft proved their value for reconnaissance and as weapons platforms. Pilots of those primitive flying machines showed both courage and endurance in carrying out air missions. To recognize their gallantry, the Distinguished Flying Cross was created.
The prime mover behind the DFC was Sen. Hiram Bingham of Connecticut. An air power advocate and veteran World War I pilot, Bingham used his position as a member of the Aircraft Board, to which President Calvin Coolidge had appointed him, to propose that Congress create an aviation award “for heroism or outstanding achievement.”
Bingham’s colleagues established the Distinguished Flying Cross on July 2, 1926. By law, the new decoration could be awarded to anyone in the Air Corps of the Army, Navy or Marine Corps after April 6, 1917, who “distinguished himself by heroism or extraordinary achievement while participating in aerial flight.”

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