Summary

Birth:
19 Oct 1878 1
19 Oct 1878 1
Paris 2
Death:
15 May 1951 1
Fort Myers, Lee, Florida, USA 2
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DeLaunay, Paul
DeLaunay, Paul
00264_1950_ Paul_de_Launay_Legion_of_Honor_FtMyers_article.jpg
00264_1950_ Paul_de_Launay_Legion_of_Honor_FtMyers_article.jpg
Newspaper article in 1950 of Paul de Launay receiving the French Legion of Honor while living in Ft. Myers.
00261_1919 Paul Oval.jpg
00261_1919 Paul Oval.jpg
00161_1927ClassPhoto.jpg
00161_1927ClassPhoto.jpg
00264_1950_ Paul_de_Launay_Legion_of_Honor_FtMyers_article.jpg
00264_1950_ Paul_de_Launay_Legion_of_Honor_FtMyers_article.jpg
00062_OrigPixPaul_1892.jpg
00062_OrigPixPaul_1892.jpg
00063_OrigPixPaul_1881-82.jpg
00063_OrigPixPaul_1881-82.jpg
00065_OrigPaul@2years.jpg
00065_OrigPaul@2years.jpg
00154_May1928HowardCamp.jpg
00154_May1928HowardCamp.jpg
Paul_deLaunay.tiff
Paul_deLaunay.tiff
Malone Outside.jpg
Malone Outside.jpg
Neighborhood friends and fellow artists, Paul de Launay and Blondelle Malone, outside the Malone house on Gervais street.
Malone Drawing Room.jpg
Malone Drawing Room.jpg
Neighborhood friends and fellow artists, Paul de Launay and Blondelle Malone, in the drawing room at the Malone house at 1517 Gervais Street, Columbia, SC.
1918_PaulDeLaunay_WWI_draftCard.jpg
1918_PaulDeLaunay_WWI_draftCard.jpg
1937 Passport of artist Paul de Launay
1937 Passport of artist Paul de Launay
1951 Death Certificate of Paul de Launay
1951 Death Certificate of Paul de Launay
1931 Marriage Certificate
1931 Marriage Certificate
Paul de Launay & Mabel Ray Beasley
First Marriage of Paul de Launay
First Marriage of Paul de Launay
Marriage record at Bruton Church, of Paul de Launay and Florence Grace Hensley in 1902.
WWI U.S. Draft Card of Paul de Launay
WWI U.S. Draft Card of Paul de Launay
On 11 Sep 1918, this document shows his address as 1402 Gervais St., Columbia, SC, (just one block from Blondelle Malone at 1517 Gervais St.); his 2nd wife Olive; his true birth date of 18 Oct 1878; and though he was born in Paris, it shows his citizenship by his father's naturalization.
00268_Dr._Louis_Appia_post_card_to_Anna_de_Launay_1893_back.jpg
00268_Dr._Louis_Appia_post_card_to_Anna_de_Launay_1893_back.jpg
Co-Founder of the Red Cross, Dr. Louis Appia, writes in 1893 to a family friend in Paris, Madame Anna Augusta (born Ollerenshaw) de Launay. More info about the family can be found at http://www.MyFamilyJules.com.
Photo of Paul de Launay's French Legion of Honor Medal.
Photo of Paul de Launay's French Legion of Honor Medal.
On February 20, 1950 Paul de Launay was awarded the Chevalier de la Légion of d’Honneur (French Legion of Honor.)
Photo of French Medal Awarded to Paul de Launay in 1926.
Photo of French Medal Awarded to Paul de Launay in 1926.
On March, 15 1926 de Launay was awarded Palms of the University by the Société Académique d'Histoire Internationale.
Paul de Launay, 1900 Class Photo at the Julien Academy, Paris.
Paul de Launay, 1900 Class Photo at the Julien Academy, Paris.
Class photo of the students of Jean-Paul Laurens in 1900 at the Julien Académie. Paul de Launay was also a student of Léon Bonnat at the Luxembourg.

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Personal Details

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Full Name:
Paul Louis Jules Errett Bishop de Launay 1
Person:
Paul Louis Jules Errett Bishop de Launay 1
Paul DeLaunay 3
Age in 1930: 52 1
Age in 1930: 46 3
Age in 1937: 59 1
Birth:
19 Oct 1878 1
19 Oct 1878 1
Paris 2
Male 2
Actual Birth Year: 1878 1
Estimated Birth Year: 1884 3
Death:
15 May 1951 1
Fort Myers, Lee, Florida, USA 2
Residence:
Place: JEFFERSON County, Alabama 3
From: 1930 3
Enumeration District: BIRMINGHAM CITY (N/S), PCT 1 3
Edit
Birth:
Mother: Anna Augusta Ollerenshaw 2
Father: Jules Gabriel Gaston Zoé de Launay 2
Marriage:
Mabel Ray Beasley 1
17 Aug 1931 2
Rome, Georgia, USA 2
Spouse Death Date: 30 Jun 1970 2
Marriage:
Olive Marshall Spigener 2
12 Nov 1909 2
Columbia, South Carolina, USA 2
Divorce Date: about 1928 2
Spouse Death Date: 23 Jul 1981 2
Marriage:
Florence Grace Hensley 1
20 Jun 1903 2
Williamsburg, Virginia 2
Spouse Death Date: 03 Jan 1907 2
Edit
Occupation:
Artist, organist, professor. 2
Religion:
Protestant 2
Occupation:
Professor 1

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Stories

"ANECDOTES", printed in THE QUILL, pp. 25-27

Howard College, Alabama

00062_OrigPixPaul_1892.jpg
2 images

            Paul de Launay’s reminiscences of Paris, where he lived all the years of his childhood and youth, would make an interesting volume.  There is offered here only his early recollection of the great scientist Pasteur, whose institute of scientific research was situated in the quarter where Paul de Launay’s father lived.  The de Launays lived in fact in the second house from the Institute Pasteur.  It is evident from the reminiscences that the young lad Paul had a flair for greatness in men, and that Louis Pasteur, preoccupied with his serums and his ferments, failed not to appreciate the devotion of a little schoolboy:

            "We lived then in Rue Dutot in the Southwest of Paris.  Every day, trudging along from my home to the school, I passed in front of the Institute Pasteur, and every day returning home for lunch I had the opportunity to see the great Pasteur as he came out of the Institute to get into his carriage, a one-horse carriage with one lone coachman waiting for him every day at the same hour.  The street was a quiet one, and usually Pasteur and I were the only persons (not counting the coachman) in front of the Institute toward lunch time.  Invaribly, and with pleasure, I took off my beret as Pasteur approached, and he invariably, as all gentlemen do in the Old Country, acknowledged my salute by taking off his top hat.  I remember his smile.  He generally smiled at me, although I remember too that he often looked worried.  As he came out of that gate and as I waited to let him pass, my hat off my head and smiling, his head was often lowered as if he were in serious thought, yet he never failed to notice me.  Perhaps he could not help noticing me, as I was the only other soul there."

            "Later, I remember acting as guide for visitors in Paris, guests in our home from different parts of the world, who wished to observe the work that was being carried on in the Institute.  I used to take these friends of ours to see the laboratories and the rooms where patients were being treated on Thursdays between nine and eleven.  I can see the lines of patients yet, many of them shepherds who had been bitten by mad dogs and who had come to the Institute to receive free treatment.  Pasteur himself frequently injected the serum in the hip of the patient.  On one of these occasions our guest whom we took to see Pasteur was the famous Dr. Louis Appia, one of the founders of the Red Cross at Geneva.  Many times, visiting the Institute and standing near Pasteur to watch the injecting of the serum, I recall how the great man, recognizing me, tapped me gently on the shoulder or placed his hand on my head as he spoke a few words of greeting."

           "Pasteur was a man of rather small stature, something like five feet five.  His hair was a mixture of silver and black.  His pointed beard was a short and grayish.  He always wore a little black necktie, like the one we wear with our Tuxedos.  His clothes were black, and he always wore on this silk hat a band of black felt such as is worn in France for mourning.  The only decoration he wore was the rosette of the legion of Honor, a lapel button made of red moiré.  Otherwise he was simplicity itself."

            "I remember an amusing incident which someone told us about Pasteur.  It happened at a banquet given in his honor, with the President of the Republic, Carnot, as host, assisted by several of the greatest dignitaries of the world.  Near the close of the banquet Pasteur was asked to make a speech.  Naturally his subject was microbes and germs.  Although coffee was being served, he drank none of it, but filled his glass with water and drank a little from time to time as he spoke…he said that people were not as careful as they should be in avoiding germs, that all fruits (and he pointed to a magnificent dish of golden grapes) should be washed before being eaten.  And by way of demonstration he quietly took a bunch of grapes from the dish and dipped them in his glass of water.  Then placing the grapes on his plate he raised the glass to the light and pointed out to al the guests near him that there were enough germs in the smallest drop of the water to spread many of the most dangerous epidemics, enough typhoid germs to kill whole armies.  He put the glass down on the table and went on with his speech.  He spoke well and kept everyone interested, but alas, in the heat of discourse he must have forgotten all about the dangerous contents of his glass, for a few minutes later, talking still, he hurriedly lifted it and drank all the water it contained together with all its deadly germs.  His mistake may have injured his health, but it di not detract from the amusement of the guests."

Short Biography of Paul de Launay

Photo of French Medal Awarded to Paul de Launay in 1926.
4 images

            Paul de Launay, born in Paris, educated there, at the University, the School of Fine Arts and the Conservatory of Musique.  During his boyhood became a choirboy under Gounod at St. Eustache of Paris, as soprano soloist.  At 13, de Launay became an organist, and as a pianist, he accompanied several of the grand opera singers of the capital at the Paris Opera.

            He studied under Anthiome, the Dean of the Conservatory, Lavignac, Massnet, Guilmant and others.  He studied painting with Jean-Paul Laurens and Benjamin Constant, drawing under Gerome and sculpture with Fremiet, the famous animal sculptor.  De Launay won many various prizes in both painting and sculpture, at competitions and expositions.  Among these rewards, one silver medal for music, one bronze medal for art, at a students’ exhibition, etc.  He traveled throughout France, Switzerland, England, the Channel Islands, Canada, and the United States where he gave recitals on the organ.

            In 1902, he was appointed organist and choirmaster of St. Thomas Anglican Church of Montreal, Canada, and Director of Music at Westmount Methodist Institute, also in Montreal.  In 1903, he was called to the directorship of the Conservatory of Danville, Virginia (Roanoke Baptist College) and as organist and choirmaster of Mt. Vernon Methodist Church.

            In 1906, the first year of the school’s existence, Paul de Launay was hired as the Director of Art and Music at Sweet Briar College in Sweet Briar, Virginia.  When his English-born wife of only three years, Florence Grace (born Hensley) de Launay, died suddenly of breast cancer on 3 January 1907, Paul was devastated and would remain at Sweet Briar just one year.  Trying to escape the pain of her death after the school year, Paul moved 300 miles south to Columbia, South Carolina and was appointed organist of Trinity Episcopal Church, a position he kept for eleven years.

            Paul de Launay gave concerts at the University of Virginia beginning in 1907, for various occasions and for summer school.  While in Columbia, South Carolina, he founded the well known School of Music and Art of that city from where many teachers, established in leading institutions throughout the country, graduated.  He also created the famous series of Lenten Organ and Orchestra Recitals, known as “Twilight Recitals,” which enabled him to prove his versatility, energy and capabilities as a conductor as well as an organist.

            In 1909, he was nominated member of the American Guild of Organists by the New York chapter.  That same year he became director of music in the Masonic Temples for both the York and the Scottish Rites.  He traveled throughout the States, especially the Eastern and Southern States, giving hundreds of recitals in Universities, Colleges and Churches.

            During WWI, de Launay taught French to officers and soldiers at Camp Jackson, from May 1917 until the end of June 1918, work which he did in connection with his numerous other duties.  During 1918, he also filled the chair of French Literature at the University of South Carolina, in place of Dr. W. Currell, the president, and of Dr. A. Beziat, who joined the Army YMCA.  During July and August of 1918, he gave up his work in Columbia to join the YMCA at Camp Jackson as Associate Director of French.

            At the beginning of 1919, he was appointed organist and choirmaster of St. John’s Evangelical Church in Evansville, Indiana.  There he founded the School of Music and Art, giving many recitals.  He originated, prepared and conducted the first spring music festival of Evansville on June 12, 1919.

            In September 1919 he was appointed Director of the new Conservatory of Music at Howard College (now called Samford College) in Birmingham, Alabama.  He wrote the score for the original school alma mater song.

            On March, 15 1926 de Launay was awarded Palms of the University from the Société Académique d'Histoire Internationale.

            In July 1, 1936, he was made an Officer of the Academy by Ministry of Education by the Republic of France.

On February 20, 1950 he was awarded the Chevalier de la Légion of d’Honneur (French Legion of Honor.)

I remember my father as a handsome, debonair and courtly French gentleman who loved to tell wonderful stories, some humorous, some otherwise. He made family history live and grow in me.

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