Pictures & Records (51)

1888 approx FH-HJW Henry Joseph Walk Younger Age 23.jpg
1888 approx FH-HJW Henry Joseph Walk Younger Age 23.jpg
1924 FH-HJW Henry Joseph Walk Extended Family-2.jpg
1924 FH-HJW Henry Joseph Walk Extended Family-2.jpg
1910 approx FH-HJW Henry Joseph Walk Age 55.jpg
1910 approx FH-HJW Henry Joseph Walk Age 55.jpg
1915 approx FH-HJW Henry Joseph Walk Age 60 (Born 10 Dec 1854).jpg
1915 approx FH-HJW Henry Joseph Walk Age 60 (Born 10 Dec 1854).jpg
1854 FH-HJW FH-FAMD-093b Henry Joseph Walk Birth Certificate from England 1854-Fix_1.jpg
1854 FH-HJW FH-FAMD-093b Henry Joseph Walk Birth Certificate from England 1854-Fix_1.jpg
1905 approx FH-HJW Margate, England -- Henry Joseph Walk Birth Place 1854 -- Margate Jetta.jpg
1905 approx FH-HJW Margate, England -- Henry Joseph Walk Birth Place 1854 -- Margate Jetta.jpg
1992 approx FH-HJW Margate, England, where Henry Joseph Walk was Born in 1854.jpg
1992 approx FH-HJW Margate, England, where Henry Joseph Walk was Born in 1854.jpg
1865 approx FH-HJW Ann Harriet Franklin Age 36, Mother of Henry Joseph Walk.jpg
1865 approx FH-HJW Ann Harriet Franklin Age 36, Mother of Henry Joseph Walk.jpg
1884 approx FH-HJW Ann Harriet Franklin Age 57, Mother of Henry Joseph Walk.jpg
1884 approx FH-HJW Ann Harriet Franklin Age 57, Mother of Henry Joseph Walk.jpg
1902 approx FH-HJW Ann Harriet Franklin Age 83, Mother of Henry Joseph Walk.jpg
1902 approx FH-HJW Ann Harriet Franklin Age 83, Mother of Henry Joseph Walk.jpg
1994 approx FH-HJW 1828 Birthplace of Ann Harriet Franklin, Mother of HJW.jpg
1994 approx FH-HJW 1828 Birthplace of Ann Harriet Franklin, Mother of HJW.jpg
1860 approx FH-HJW Henry Joseph Walk's Father -- Joseph Walk.jpg
1860 approx FH-HJW Henry Joseph Walk's Father -- Joseph Walk.jpg
1875 approx FH-HJW John Scott (HJW Stepfathr) & Annie Jane Scott (AKA Lillie) HJW's Half Sister.jpg
1875 approx FH-HJW John Scott (HJW Stepfathr) & Annie Jane Scott (AKA Lillie) HJW's Half Sister.jpg
---- FH-HJW Henry Joseph Walk & Lydia Elizabeth Smith Family Group Sheet 1908 - 1920.jpg
---- FH-HJW Henry Joseph Walk & Lydia Elizabeth Smith Family Group Sheet 1908 - 1920.jpg
1902 approx FH-HJW Ada Burbridge Age 44.jpg
1902 approx FH-HJW Ada Burbridge Age 44.jpg
---- FH-HJW Henry Joseph Walk & Ada Elizabeth Burbidge Family Group Sheet 1876-1902.jpg
---- FH-HJW Henry Joseph Walk & Ada Elizabeth Burbidge Family Group Sheet 1876-1902.jpg
---- FH-HJW Iconic Mormon (LDS) Temple, Salt Lake City, Utah.jpg
---- FH-HJW Iconic Mormon (LDS) Temple, Salt Lake City, Utah.jpg
---- FH-HJW Christ's Visit to America Recorded in Book of Mormon-1.jpg
---- FH-HJW Christ's Visit to America Recorded in Book of Mormon-1.jpg
---- FH-HJW Christ's Visit to America Recorded in Book of Mormon-2.jpg
---- FH-HJW Christ's Visit to America Recorded in Book of Mormon-2.jpg
1881 FH-HJW The Steamer Wyoming Carried Henry & Ada Walk to America.jpg
1881 FH-HJW The Steamer Wyoming Carried Henry & Ada Walk to America.jpg
1881 FH-HJW The Steamer Wyoming Carried Many Latter Day Saints Across Atlantic Ocean.jpg
1881 FH-HJW The Steamer Wyoming Carried Many Latter Day Saints Across Atlantic Ocean.jpg
1884 approx FH-HJW ZCMI Department Store -- Henry Joseph Walk was Cashier & Accountant.jpg
1884 approx FH-HJW ZCMI Department Store -- Henry Joseph Walk was Cashier & Accountant.jpg
1882 FH-HJW Deseret Sunday School Union Brass Band Secretary & Treasurer.jpg
1882 FH-HJW Deseret Sunday School Union Brass Band Secretary & Treasurer.jpg
1884 approx FH-HJW Henry Joseph Walk House in Brighton Flats, Utah.jpg
1884 approx FH-HJW Henry Joseph Walk House in Brighton Flats, Utah.jpg
1875 approx FH-HJW Annie Jane Scott (AKA Lillie) HJW's Half Sister.jpg
1875 approx FH-HJW Annie Jane Scott (AKA Lillie) HJW's Half Sister.jpg
1885 approx FH-HJW Anne Scott (Lillie) who came to America in 1885 to live with Henry Joseph Walk.jpg
1885 approx FH-HJW Anne Scott (Lillie) who came to America in 1885 to live with Henry Joseph Walk.jpg
1892 approx FH-HJW Henry Age 37 & 2 Sons on Globe Bakery Wagon circa 1892.jpg
1892 approx FH-HJW Henry Age 37 & 2 Sons on Globe Bakery Wagon circa 1892.jpg
1890 FH-HJW Bakery Recipes for Spice Cookies and Lemon Cookies.jpg
1890 FH-HJW Bakery Recipes for Spice Cookies and Lemon Cookies.jpg
1894 approx FH-HJW Henry Joseph Walk age 40.jpg
1894 approx FH-HJW Henry Joseph Walk age 40.jpg
1914 FH-HJW -- In 1901, Annie E Walk Married Samuel Sampson Miles.jpg
1914 FH-HJW -- In 1901, Annie E Walk Married Samuel Sampson Miles.jpg
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Why Henry Joseph Walk’s Life Story is Important

Salt Lake City, UT

1924 FH-HJW Henry Joseph Walk Extended Family-2.jpg
3 images

Look at the picture of Henry Joseph Walk’s extended family of 65 members in 1924.  Now at this time, can you imagine the thousands of people who are alive today because of him and through him.  These descendants of his all owe their lives --- and that of their posterity (children, grandchildren, etc) --- owe it all to this one man.  They are alive today because of him.  Henry Joseph Walk clearly had an inspired vision of the future.  He understood the importance of family and rearing children, with duty to sustain and educate them in a structured and nurturing family environment.

Furthermore, he clearly understood and taught by example, that a rather average person like him, of above-average vision, could put his faith into action to achieve an /*immense*/ impact on the future.  This ability to see into the future is clearly a distinguishing feature of the life and faith of Henry Joseph Walk.

Since he lived his life as an inspired man of faith, he had the impact of a visionary.  His descendants have studied his life, kept records about him, and are now publishing the story of his life.  The bottom line message of his life story, as many descendants who have studied it have concluded, is this: 

“It is clearly possible for /*every*/ person of faith and commitment to impact the world for good.”

This life story preserved by his descendants, and the pictures of his generations, are all living testaments to the joy of active religious participation in church, which he professed to be “The Church of the Living God.”  This participation is accomplished through regular active church attendance, daily study in the scriptures, sincere daily prayer put into action, and active church service, which includes missionary service to share the particular flavor of the “The Gospel of Jesus Christ” taught by the Latter Day Saints, the LDS church, which was the faith of this man who saw the future.

No apologies are necessary for doing great deeds that bless the future of all mankind!  So the great legion of descendants of Henry Joseph Walk give sincere thanks to the life of this man of faith --- for a life that can be every person’s life, who shares beliefs and values such as his.

Life in a metaphoric sense is like a candle whose flame is lit by others, who are our parents, mothers and fathers.  Henry Joseph Walk lit many candles in this way, which is a reason in part, for why we celebrate and study his life.

Though this introduction is rather long, it can never be long enough to pay full tribute to the life of the man it celebrates --- our father through the generations --- Henry Joseph Walk.

Henry Joseph Walk --- Birth and Parents

Margate, Kent, England

1854 FH-HJW FH-FAMD-093b Henry Joseph Walk Birth Certificate from England 1854-Fix_1.jpg
3 images

Henry Joseph Walk was born on 10 Dec 1854 in the town of Margate, Kent, England.  ” Throughout this history of his life, Henry Joseph Walk will be known simply as “Henry.”

The place of Henry’s birth, Margate, Kent, England, is located on the English Channel, at the very south eastern tip of England, right on the sea coast.  Margate is a mariner town that also includes some of the white cliffs of Dover.  The town of Margate is built upon the white cliffs, which overlook famous beaches where many of the rich, including royalty, come to vacation and sunbathe.  Pictures of Margate in this section show the picturesque character of this seaport and tourist location.

Henry’s father, who was named Joseph Walk, died at the early age of 34 when Henry was just 7 years old.  Early death was not infrequent in the mid 1800s.  So Henry never really did get to know very well his first father, who was superseded by a step father whom his mother married 4 years later when Henry was 11.  There will be a short section devoted entirely to Henry’s two fathers.

Henry’s mother was Ann Harriet Franklin Walk, who will be known simply as “Ann” or “Annie” throughout this story.  Ann Harriet was also the name given to Annie at her baptism.  However, in many historical records maintained by her descendants, that are written on her pictures and family trees, and that are submitted to genealogical libraries and family history archives, her given names appear in the reverse order  of “Harriet Ann,” rather than as “Ann Harriet.”  So this reversal of names, which is not uncommon, is the error of what happened to Annie in later family historical records.

Annie lived a long life up to age 96, and so her influence on young Henry was continuous and of substantial duration.  There is much more information about Annie then there is about her father.  So there is a section devoted entirely to Annie, which will appear first before the section on Henry’s two fathers.

Pictures of the town of Margate, where Henry grew up, appear in this section.

About Henry Joseph Walk’s Mother, Annie

Margate, Kent, England

1865 approx FH-HJW Ann Harriet Franklin Age 36, Mother of Henry Joseph Walk.jpg
4 images

This section is About Henry Joseph Walk’s Mother, Ann (or Annie), full maiden name of “Ann Harriet Franklin.”

Henry’s mother, Annie, was the child of John Edward Franklin and Jane Twyman (Yes, the spelling is believed correct).  She was born at Margate, Kent, England and was baptized “Ann Harriet” in the Parish of St John Thanet in Margate, Kent, England on 09 Nov 1828.  Annie’s father was listed as a mariner on the baptismal certificate.  Annie was born at the Bulls Head Hotel, a hotel owned by John and Martha Franklin.  (See pictures.)

In her early youth, Annie is reported by her granddaughter Annie E. Walk Miles, to have been a nurse for the Queen of England, in these words:  “Grandmother had been the Queen of England’s nurse in her younger days.  She had three sons by her first husband and three daughters by her second husband.”

Annie married Henry’s father, Joseph Walk, (her first husband) on 01 Jan 1854 in the Parish Church of St. John Thanet in Margate, Kent, England.  She was 25 and he was 27.  They had three sons who lived beyond childhood, and various other children who died in infancy.  The 3 children of Ann and Joseph Walk who survived infancy were:

1.  Henry Joseph Walk born 10 Dec 1854, who died in 1930 at age 74.  This story is about him, whom we call simply “Henry.”

2.  Joseph Walk born 23 Apr 1858, who died in 1875 at age 17.

3.  Frederich Thomas Walk born 29 Mar 1861, who died in 1913 at age 52, 11 years before his mother died.

When Henry’s father, Joseph Walk, passed away very early in life in 1861 at age 34 Annie was left alone to support a 7 year old son (Henry), a 3 ½ year old son, and a nine month old infant son.

Four years later, when Henry was 11, Ann married her second husband, John Scott in 1865, in Canterbury, Kent, England.  Thereafter, she called herself “Ann Scott,” or “Annie Scott.”  Annie Scott had three girls, only one of which survived longer than 4 years:

1.  Annie Jane Scott, born 02 Nov 1865 --- AKA Lillie, who came to America in 1885 to join her half-brother Henry.

2.  Florence Franklin Scott, burn 12 Jun 1867, died at age 3 1/2

3.  Gertrude Scott, born 03 Dec 1868, died after 12 days

Annie Scott corresponded by letter throughout her life with her son Henry, whom she called “Harry,” and with her daughter, who was known as Lillie.  Transcribed letters of Annie Scott (Henry’s mother) to her son Harry (Henry Joseph Walk) and her daughter Lillie (Annie Jane Scott) are available and appear at the end of this record.  Annie Scott lived a long life, spent entirely in the town of Margate.  She died in Margate in 1924 at age 96.

About Henry Joseph Walk’s Father and Stepfather

Margate, Kent, England

1860 approx FH-HJW Henry Joseph Walk's Father -- Joseph Walk.jpg
2 images

This section is about Henry’s two fathers. 

Henry’s birth father, Joseph Walk, is listed in the record of England Births and Christenings, 1538-1975, as having been baptized / christened on 07 Oct 1827 in St. Lawrence, Kent, England, with a father named Thomas Walk and with a mother named Mary.  In the England and Wales Census of 1841, Henry’s birth father, Joseph Walk, is listed as a male 14 years old with birthplace of Kent.  In the census of 1861, he is listed as head of household age 33, born in St. Lawrence, Kent, England. 

In the personal family records of Henry’s son, Earl Franklin Walk (1915 – 2007), Henry’s father’s profession is listed as “Baker Master,”:  “1854 – December 10, Henry Joseph Walk Born to Joseph Walk, a Baker master, and Ann Harriet Walk, formerly Franklin living on Addington Street, Margate, Kent, England.”

The fact that Henry himself operated and owned his own bakery business as a young man prior to and after his marriage, help confirm that baking was indeed the family trade.

Unfortunately, Henry’s birth father, Joseph Walk, passed away early in life at age 34, on 26 Dec 1861 in Margate, Kent, England, from what was called back then, a ruptured heart.  When he died, he left Annie all alone to support a 7 year old son (Henry), a 3 ½ year old son, and a nine month old baby boy.

Four the next four years (ages 7 to 11), Henry had no father.  But when Henry turned 11 years old, Annie married John Scott in 1865, in Canterbury, Kent, England.  Due to family circumstance, the young teenager Henry decided to leave the household and go to work by becoming a baker of breads, pastries, and puddings.  From that time forth, Henry earned his own way in life without parental support.

Marriage of Henry Joseph Walk and Ada Elizabeth Burbidge

Margate, Kent, England

1902 approx FH-HJW Ada Burbridge Age 44.jpg
2 images

After working as a baker, and obtaining his own bakery shop, Henry Joseph Walk at age 21, met and married a young woman whom he had met by the name of Ada Elizabeth Burbidge, age 18.  The marriage was on 03 Nov 1876.  Ada was born 17 Sep 1858 in Andover, Hampshire, England, the daughter of Charles Mann Burbidge and Fanny Hammond.

Within their first 4 years of marriage, Henry Joseph Walk and Ada Elizabeth Burbidge had 3 children:

1.  Charles Henry Walk, born in West Cow, East Cowes, Isle of Wight, England.

2.  Henry Charles Walk, born in Salisbury, Wilts, England on 26 July 1878.

3.  Annie Elizabeth Walk, born in Andover, Hampshire, England on 02 Nov 1979. 

A story of the life of Annie Elizabeth Walk is found here: http://www.footnote.com/page/111483225_mormon_pioneer_annie_elizabeth_walk/

Learning about the LDS (Mormon) Church

Andover, Hampshire, England

---- FH-HJW Iconic Mormon (LDS) Temple, Salt Lake City, Utah.jpg
3 images

In the late 1870s, at the time of her marriage to Henry, Ada had an uncle, William Hammond, who had emigrated to the Utah Territory in the United States of America.  William had likely shared his experiences of living in the western United States with his family in England.  So when missionaries from the Utah-based Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints (Mormon) came to visit and introduced them to The Book of Mormon, Henry and Ada took great interest.  As a consequence of their newfound faith, Joseph and Ada became converts to the Church and were baptized on 07 Apr 1880.  A differing record, believed to be erroneous, lists their conversion date on 04 Jul 1880.  Regardless of the exact formal date of their joining the church, their plan was to join tens of thousands of others from England and Europe, who emigrated to the Utah Territory in America.  Utah was considered by the Mormons to be the Heart of Zion.

Travelling Across the Atlantic Ocean to Settle in Zion

: Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah

1881 FH-HJW The Steamer Wyoming Carried Henry & Ada Walk to America.jpg
2 images

The new Mormon converts soon made preparations to sail across the Atlantic Ocean, for their journey to the Promised Land of Utah.  For this purpose, the young couple and their 3 children set sail on 03 Sep 1881 in the company of Mormon missionaries, on the British flag, brig-rigged screw steamer, Wyoming.  While crossing the ocean, Ada became very ill and was bedridden during most of the voyage.  She was so ill that she had to be carried off the ship when it docked in America.  During the journey across the ocean, her husband Henry took a job helping the baker on the ship, so that Ada could have better food.  On 13 Sep 1881, the family completed the 10-day voyage to land in New York.  And on 21 Sep 1881, the family of five arrived in Salt Lake City, Utah, settling temporarily for a short time at Lake Point in Tooele County, Utah with her uncle, William Hammond.  Note:  There are differing records that list the ship departure date as 06 Jul 1881, and arrival date in Salt Lake of 02 Sep 1881.  These dates are very close to the dates above, but are inconsistent.

Henry Joseph Walk Family Settles in the Utah Territory

Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah

1884 approx FH-HJW ZCMI Department Store -- Henry Joseph Walk was Cashier & Accountant.jpg
2 images

Soon after their arrival in the United States in 1881, the Walk family moved to Salt Lake City, where they immediately became interested and active in church activities.  The Walk family lived in the Second Ward (a “ward” is a church unit of about 200 members).  Henry took a position as clerk and bookkeeper working for Zion’s Cooperative Mercantile Institution (ZCMI), a large department store founded in 1868 by Brigham Young.  ZCMI was one of the earliest and largest department stores established in United States history.  This was the work position that Henry held for 46 years, until his retirement due to illness in 1927.

Even with his work at ZCMI however, Henry was still involved throughout his life with baking, especially creating artistically decorated cakes for special occasions, such as weddings and anniversaries.  This stemmed in part from his art skills in hand writing and calligraphy.  During his work years at ZCMI, Henry also bought farm land for growing crops and fruit trees, so his boys could be involved in the satisfaction and honest labor of performing the useful service of farm work.

On 27 Dec 1882, Henry was selected as secretary of the Deseret Sunday School Union Brass Band.  Later in life, Henry’s children report that he would at times take out his cornet (a musical brass instrument like a trumpet, but shorter), and play it outside for the amusement of the neighborhood.  When this happened, all the children and neighbors would march up and down the street with delight.

The Walk family home was near a match factory in Salt Lake City.  At about the time of the birth of their fourth child in May 1883, the match factory burned down.  The men who came to extinguish the fire took the blankets off Ada’s bed and placed them wet on the roof to keep the house from burning.  They carried the water up ladders and poured it on the blankets.

Other events in this time period include the following:  On 11 Sep 1883, Henry became a citizen of the United States.  On 08 Apr 1884, he was ordained a Seventy of the LDS Church by Seymour Young.  On 26 Oct 1884, he received a Patriarchal Blessing from Patriarch John Smith. 

Moving to a New Home in Brighton Flats, Utah

Brighton Flats, Salt Lake, Utah

1884 approx FH-HJW Henry Joseph Walk House in Brighton Flats, Utah.jpg

The Walk family made their next move to the Wilford Woodruff home near the graveyard in Salt Lake City shortly thereafter.  Here they lived for while, until the family moved to a place on the Brighton Flats, where Henry purchased a home, sight unseen, for his family.  The house had no roof, and on the first night the family moved in, Ada tied quilts to the bed posts to keep the snow off the children.  She shook the snow off every few hours trying to keep the children warm.  On the next night, the neighbors came and held a welcome party.  That same evening, the family horse ran away and Henry had to walk five miles to work the next morning!

In Brighton Flats, during polygamist times that persisted until its abandonment in 1890, the Walk family would help take care of polygamist women in need.  On some nights, there were as many as three or four polygamist women at the Walk Family home.  Henry did not endorse this practice himself, but his home was open to those who were being troubled because of it.

While they were living in their new home at Brighton Flats, Henry would get large logs from City Creek for fire wood.  Then Ada, with the help of her children, would saw up the logs into stove-length pieces every night just before sundown -- except she did not saw logs on Sunday, their day-of-rest.

City Creek is described here:  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/City_Creek_(Salt_Lake_City)

Half Sister Annie Jane Scott (Lillie) Emigrates to Utah

Brighton Flats, Salt Lake, Utah

1875 approx FH-HJW Annie Jane Scott (AKA Lillie) HJW's Half Sister.jpg
2 images

At this time in 1885, Annie’s younger daughter, Annie Jane Scott (Henry’s half sister, who went by the name of Lillie), came to America when she was 18 years of age.  Of Annie Scott’s daughters, she was the only girl to live to adulthood.  Lillie came to America to live with her half brother, Henry and his family.

Prior to the purchase of the farm in Hunter, Utah (later in the early 1900s), there is a story about how Henry gained a plot of farm ground in Grantsville, Utah according to the Homestead Act.  However, this plot was lost when a friend whom he trusted failed to continue filing the necessary papers needed to retain title to the land.  Not to be defeated, Henry later purchased his own farm in Hunter, Utah, so that his boys could work on the land (later in the early 1900s).

Baker for Globe Bakery

Brighton, Salt Lake, Utah

1892 approx FH-HJW Henry Age 37 & 2 Sons on Globe Bakery Wagon circa 1892.jpg
2 images

Throughout his life, Henry was involved with the bakery profession.  Even while he was working as clerk and treasurer at the large ZCMI department store, he was also working as a baker at the same time.  This allowed him to earn extra income to support his growing family, which in 1890 numbered 8 people, with 5 children, his wife, sister Lille, and himself.  The extra food for the family was welcome also.  A picture of Henry with two of his sons riding in the bakery delivery wagon shows how food was distributed in those days (See photo).

Interesting events that happened in the year 1888 are the following.  On 06 Aug 1888, Henry was duly elected a Justice of the Peace in and for the Brighton Precinct in Salt Lake, and sworn in 05 Sep 1888 to the office of Justice of the Peace of the Brighton Precinct Salt Lake County & Territory of Utah.  Starting 23 Sep 1888 and lasting to 18 May 1890, he served as first Assistant Superintendent of the Brighton Sunday School.  On 14 Nov 1888, he is listed as owning nine shares of stock in the West Point Canal Company.  On 31 Dec 1888 and 01 Jan 1889, he performed in the opera, “The Bohemian Girl” at the Salt Lake Theater.

In 1890, Henry was listed in the Polk Directory as “baker Globe Bakery, res Brighton.” In 1890, he served as an alternate representative for Brighton at the People’s Municipal Convention.  On 05 Apr 1892, he purchased the north half of Lot 1 in Block 8 of Plat R in the Salt Lake City Cemetery.  In 1893, he is listed in the Polk Directory as a bakery west side 20th West 3 n of 8th South, residence the same.

Leaving the Flats & Moving to Brighton, Utah

Brighton, Salt Lake, Utah

1894 approx FH-HJW Henry Joseph Walk age 40.jpg
4 images

In the year of 1894 approximately, 13 years after their arrival in Utah, the Walk family moved from Brighton Flats to Brighton, which was closer to central Salt Lake City, where Henry worked at ZCMI, and also at the Globe bakery and lunch room.  Members of the Walk family helped out by working in the lunch room.  The most noteworthy Walk family workers were Lillie Scott; and Annie Elizabeth Walk.  While in Brighton, the family home burned down, and a new home had to be built.  After the new home was built, the family moved into their new home and operated a bakery in Brighton, near what would now be known as 5th South and 3500 West.

In 1894, Henry is listed in the Polk Directory as a baker, residence south side 7th South nr Race Track.  On 15 Aug 1895, he was commissioned Postmaster of Brighton.  Between 09 May 1897 to 31 Dec 1899, he served as the Superintendent of the Brighton Sunday School,  In 1898, he  is listed in the Polk Directory as clerk ZCMI, residence Lake Breeze.  In 1898, he represented Brighton as an election judge. In 1899, he is listed in the Polk Directory twice  1) clerk ZCMI, residence Lake Breeze, and 2) Postmaster Brighton P.O., Residence same.  In 1900, he is listed in the Polk Directory, wrapper ZCMI, residence 24th West corner 7th South.  In 1901, he is listed in the Polk Directory, wrapper ZCMI residence corner 8th South & 24th West.  In 1902, he is listed in the Polk Directory as clerk at ZCMI residence as 8th South and 24th West.  In 1903, he is listed in the Polk Directory as wrapper at ZCMI residence as corner 8th South and 24th West.  In 1904, he is listed in the Polk Directory as clerk at ZCMI residence as 24th South between 7th & 8th South.  In 1905, he is listed in the Polk Directory as clerk at ZCMI residence as 24th South between 7th & 8th South.

A few years later, a very significant event occurred.  On 24 April 1901, Annie Elizabeth Walk, the oldest daughter of Henry and Ada, was married to Samuel Sampson Miles, son of Lee Granderson Miles and Emma Wilkinson.  This marriage was a momentous occasion for their posterity, since there are many hundreds of descendants who owe their lives to this marriage, including the author’s (Warren Henry Taylor, Jr.) own wife, Stephanie Lois Duncan Taylor, who is the great granddaughter of Annie Elizabeth Walk.

Purchase of 40 Acre Farmland in Hunter, Utah

Hunter, Salt Lake, Utah

1905 approx FH-HJW Henry Joseph Walk Age 50.jpg
3 images

In the early 1900s, circa 1903, Henry bought 40 acres of land to farm in Hunter, Utah.  But he continued to live in Brighten, Utah, where he was working at ZCMI.  The farm property address faced 3500 South in Hunter, Utah. 

In the 1907 Polk Directory, Henry is listed as wrapper at ZCMI, residence Hunter.  So the purchase of the property occurred on or before the year 1907.  In 1908, extra rooms were built on to the front and west side of the house in Hunter.

Regarding the 40 acre farmland purchase, there was an agreement that Henry made with Christopher Layton, that an acre of ground be sold to the LDS Church to be used as a Bishop’s Tithing Yard.  This acre was located just south of 3500 South on 5200 West, on the east side of the street.  This agreement was carried out as planned.  The church put up a granary with a hayloft in the top, and grain bins below, as a place for the Latter Day Saints to deliver their tithing with farm produce, since hard money cash was scarce.  Later, when the church had no further use for the tithing yard, the granary was sold to Earnest E. Nielsen, and Henry bought the acre of land back.

The forty acre plot that Henry bought in Hunter, Utah was good farmland.  The farm produced hay, grain, beets, and potatoes, as well as many vegetables for the table.  Several acres were put into fruit trees such as cherry trees, several varieties of apple trees, and peach trees, along with several pear, plum, and quince trees.  There were also small berries cultivated there.  This farm was an investment that Henry made for his boys, whom he felt would learn and become productive on the farm.  The boys stayed there in the summertime, and then moved back to Brighton in the fall after the harvest.

Passing of Henry Joseph Walk’s First Wife, Ada

Hunter, Salt Lake, Utah

---- FH-HJW Henry Joseph Walk & Ada Elizabeth Burbidge Family Group Sheet 1876-1902.jpg
2 images

By the end of 1902, Henry’s wife Ada had given birth to 14 children, having had her first child in 1877, and her last child in 1902.  Here is a listing of the 14 children of Henry Joseph Walk and Ada Elizabeth Burbidge Walk:

Charles Henry Walk --- 05 Aug 1877; died in 1878

Henry Charles Walk --- 26 Jul 1878; m. Lucy Gray (Born in England)

Annie Elizabeth Walk --- 02 Nov 1879; m Samuel S. Miles

Joseph Frederick Walk --- 06 May 1883; m. Florence Foulger

Ada Lilly Walk --- 11 Aug 1885; m. Walter Gray

Charles Mann Walk --- 23 Aug 1887; apparently unmarried

Boy --- born 1881; died 1881

William James Walk --- 29 Aug 1889; m. Olive Binnell

Franklin Walk --- 12 Mar 1890; died 16 Sep 1890

Frederick David Walk --- 25 Sep 1892; m. Clara Baer

Fanny Flora Walk --- 28 May 1895; m. LeRoy Hamilton

Martin Samuel. Walk --- 23 Aug 1897; m. Gertrude Bolton; died 01 Dec 1949.

Edith Rose Walk --- 12 Mar 1900; m. George Snarr

Florence Flossie Walk --- 04 Oct 1902; died 24 Jun 1904

On 10 May 1907, Henry’s wife Ada passed away and was buried on 12 May 1907 in the Salt Lake Cemetary.  Upon Ada’s passing, there were five unmarried children remaining in the family.  The two older boys soon married, thus leaving Martin, Fanny and Edith to keep house for this little family.  Fanny was eleven and Edith was eight years old. 

Henry Takes Second Wife Lydia, after Passing of First Wife Ada

Brighton, Salt Lake, Utah

1924 FH-HJW -- In 1908, Henry Joseph Walk Married Lydia E. Smith.jpg
3 images

Of course, a mother was needed to help care for the two children who were now motherless.  So a little more than one year later, on 17 Jun 1908, Henry married his second wife Lydia E1izabeth Smith, to whom he was sealed in the Salt Lake Temple on 21 Apr 1911.  Lydia was the previous wife of her first deceased husband, William White.

Together, Henry Joseph Walk and his new wife Lydia Elizabeth Smith Walk had 7 children, some of whom died in infancy or childhood.  Here are the names of their children:

Harold Joseph Walk --- 4 Apr 1909; m. Muriel Evans; died 1943

Nomi L Walk --- 14 Dec 1910; died 19 Dec 1912

Arline Lydia Walk --- 10 Sep 1912;  m. Pat Wilkins

Ellen Annie Walk --- 21 Jul 1914; died 05 Jan 1915

George Albert Walk --- 18 Sep 1917; m. Shirley Ruth Orton

Earl Franklin Walk --- 03 Dec 1915; m.Thekle Runz; died 24 Aug 2007

Don Eugene Walk --- 18 Aug 1920; died 28 Dec 1925

Henry’s Volunteer Community Work in Hunter, Utah

Hunter, Salt Lake, Utah

1916 approx FH-HJW Henry Joseph Walk with daughter Arline Walk Wilcken.jpg
4 images

While Henry was farming on his 40-acre plot of land in Hunter, Utah, he did quite a bit of volunteer work to improve the community.  He was influential in having electricity installed along 3500 South, which then in 1911 was known as the Lincoln Highway.  Homes were still mostly lit with coal oil burning lamps at that time, but electricity was available and lit up the street lights at night.  By the year 1917, many families began installing electricity to replace the smoky and smelly coal oil burning lamps, which were indoor pollution sources and fire hazards in the flammable homes.

Henry and other volunteers also helped form a committee to have the dirt road along the Lincoln Highway paved.  In October 1918, there was finally concrete pavement in front of the homes of residents on Lincoln Highway.

Because of the need for transportation of goods to and from the Hunter, Utah area, Henry along with other volunteers (such as Lewis F. Bello and George A. Little) worked to make it possible for the Orem, Utah Train to come from the Bamberger Granger Station to Magna, Utah.  The Orem Train would meet the train coming from Salt Lake City going to Provo at the Granger Station.  The station was located at 1950 West 3500 South.  Passengers going west would take the Orem train through Granger, Hunter, Pleasant Green, and into Magna.  The train would then come back to the Granger Station in time to meet the Bamberger as it came from Provo headed for Salt Lake City.  It was shortly thereafter that the train began running straight thru, from Salt Lake to Magna.

On 18 May 1920, Henry received a Patriarchal blessing from Patriarch Hyrum G. Smith.  In the 1920 census, Henry is listed as living in Hunter, Utah with his wife Lydia, daughter Ruth age 16, son Harold age 10, daughter Arline age 7, son Earl age 4 ½, and son George age 2 ¾.

When the Oquirrh Stake was organized on 03 Jun 1923, Henry was installed as stake secretary and treasurer, a position he held until his death on 23 Aug 1930.  Henry was noted for his honesty and steadfastness, thus allowing him appointment to a responsible calling in a Stake of Zion (which unit of the church has about 1200 members).

Henry Joseph Walk Family Group Pictures Taken in 1924

Hunter, Salt Lake, Utah

1924 FH-HJWa Henry Joseph Walk -- 4 generations with Annie Walk Miles.jpg
2 images

There was a large Walk family reunion in 1924 where 65 members of the Henry Joseph Walk family gathered and had pictures taken.  Attending the reunion were the children of Henry and his wife, the spouses of the married children, and their children.  With the exception of only 3 individuals, each of the 65 people who appears in the labeled 1924 picture is identified by number below.

 

01. Lois Gray (Ada)

02. Meryl Walk Asay (Fred)

03. Ida Hamilton (Fanny)

04. Marian Borkley (Fred)

05. Clarence Walk (Joseph)

06. Virginia Walk Gee (Fred)

07. Earl Franklin Walk

08. LeRoy Gray (Ada)

09. Lawrence Miles (Annie)

10. George Albert Walk

11. Ross Walk (Henry)

12. Raymond Walk (Henry)

13. Mary Walk (Henry)

14. Marie Walk (Henry)

15. Robert Miles (Annie)

16. Ervin Walk (Wid)

17. Charles Miles (Annie)

18. Olive M. Binnall Walk (Wm's wife)

19. Lyle Alton Walk (William)

20. William James Walk

21. Grant Merle Walk (William)

22. Lucy Gray Walk (Henry's wife)

23. Dale Joseph Jensen (Henry's grandson)

24. Henry Charles Walk

25. Lydia Smith Walk

26. Don Eugene Walk

27. Henry Joseph Walk

28. Annie Elizabeth Walk Miles

29. ???

30. Samuel S. Miles (Annie's Husband)

31. ???

32. Florence C. Foliger Walk (Joseph' wife)

33. Joseph Fredrick Walk

34. Leland Jack Walk (Joseph)

35. |Ruth White

36. George Jasper Snarr (husband of Edith)

37. Edith Rose Snarr

38. Fredrick David Walk Jr. (Fredrick)

39. Fredrick David Walk

40. Clara Baer Walk (wife of Fredrick)

41. Florence Rose Miles (Annie)

42. Ada Lilly Walk Gray

43. Henry Lee Miles (Annie)

44. Flora Annie Miles (Henry Lee)

45. Violet Walk Jensen (Henry)

46. Leonard Jensen (Grandson of William

47. Mary Morris Miles (wife of Henry Lee)

48. Henry Albert Gray (Ada)

49. Lewis Miles (Annie)

50. Ada Miles (Annie)

51. Mable Walk (Henry)

52. Carl Walk (William)

53. ???

54. LaVerl Walk (William)

55. Walter Gray (Ada)

56. Fannie Flora Walk Hamilton

57. Arline Lydia Walk Wilcken

58. James L. Hamilton (husband of Fanny)

59. Karl Walk (William)

60. Sheldon Joseph Walk (Martin)

61. Irene Walk (William's daughter)

62. Gertrude M. Bolton Walk (wife of Martin)

63. Edwin Verl Walk (Martin)

64. Ellen Walk (William)

65. Martin Samuel Walk

Bookkeeping, Mathematics, Cake Decorating, Calligraphy

Hunter, Salt Lake, Utah

1928 FH-HJW Henry Joseph Walk with Cake He Baked and Decorated Circa 1928.jpg
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Henry Joseph Walk was a self-taught man, who mastered bookkeeping, short hand, typing, mathematics, and writing.  He was right-handed, but taught himself to be ambidextrous.  His skill was so great that one could not tell any difference in his handwriting -- or his cake decorating -- when he used his left hand.  Henry also did calligraphy as well as other fancy printing.  During his life, Henry earned his living as cashier and bookkeeper at ZCMI for forty-six years.  Plus his baking skills and cake decorating artistry were legendary in his own time.

When Henry Joseph Walk first came to America, he opened a bakery shop on Main Street across from ZCMI.  He did well in his bakery until it burned down.  Then he baked for ZCMI for a short time.  During the years at the bakery, and while working for ZCMI, Henry was baking and decorating cakes at night after work for people in Hunter and all over in the West Valley area.  This enterprise of baking and creative, ornamental decorating lasted throughout Henry’s living days, representing for him a passion for service and artistry.  One beautiful cake he made was for a military Banquet.  The cake had a miniature cannon, complete with cannonballs, soldiers, and the American Flag -- which garnered a regal enthusiastic reception at the banquet.  Another cake was made for Brother and Sister Laronzo Day for their 25th wedding anniversary.  That particular cake was so beautiful that it was never cut into.  A year before Sister Loronzo Day passed away at the age of 103, she gave that cake to Mary Anne Wilcken, a granddaughter of Henry.

Due to his excellent skill at fancy calligraphy, and thanks to his calling in serving as the stake clerk, many LDS church members in this valley received certificates of promotion, graduation, etc., with their name, date and name of organization printed beautifully and memorably by Henry Joseph Walk.

A Harrowing Car Wreck, and Letters from England

Hunter, Salt Lake, Utah

1924 FH-HJW Don Eugene Walk Age 5 Killed Dec 1925 in Coal Truck Collision.jpg
3 images

There is an interesting harrowing experience that happened to Henry sometime between the years of 1922 to 1925 approximately.  A car that he was riding in with Lon Rushton driving, was hit by the Orem train that ran west of Salt Lake to Magna, Utah.  The Orem train collided when the car was trying to cross 33rd South, two city blocks west of Redwood Road.  The accident threw Henry out of the car, causing him to crack his head severely on the railroad tracks.  He was banged up quite seriously, but managed to survive the ordeal.

Although Henry was a staunch convert to the LDS Church, and was baptized a new member while still living in England, his mother, Annie, remained in England and never did join the church.  And despite Henry’s repeated attempts to find out more about his genealogical ancestry in England, Annie shared little, except to say, “The dead are dead.  Just let them be.”  Although Annie never came over to the United States, she did write letters to correspond with her son Henry and daughter Lillie, from England across the Atlantic Ocean.  The contents of some of her letters appear at the end of this record.  Annie did in fact share a minor amount of information about her family history in those letters, even if it was not impressive.  Annie passed away in her native country of England, in Dec 1924 at the age of 96.

Another death happened next year that was quite traumatic for the Walk Family.  Their little son Don Eugene Walk, age 5, was struck and killed in a vehicular accident when he got hit by a truck while riding his tricycle.  Don was the youngest son who was being held by Henry in the Walk extended-family group picture taken a year earlier in 1924.  So the boy who died was a favorite of his dad.  The newspaper clipping announcing the child Don’s death is in one of the photos in this section.

Here is a description of Don Eugene Walk’s accident while riding his tricycle by his older brother Earl Franklin Walk. 

“My brother Don, was given a tricycle for Christmas.  His little boyfriend who was inseparable from him got a toy automobile for Christmas and they were racing each other down 5200 West about 3 days after Christmas.  It was an open winter, and there was no snow.  As they raced down the side street, they went out onto the main street (35th) and there was a coal truck and it was a big coal truck fully loaded.  It had a ton of coal on it and my little brother hit the wheel of the truck and his tricycle handlebar hit him in the chest.  He was dead before my father could get out there.  My brother Don was 5 when this accident happened.”

Cause of Death from Death Certificate

Hunter, Salt Lake, Utah

1930 FH-HJW State of Utah Death Certificate.jpg

Due to ongoing sickness that Henry suffered in 1927, Henry decided to retire from ZCMI at the age of 71 to live out the rest of his life on the farm with his family in Hunter, Utah.  Despite retiring from work, Henry was still sick much of the time.  He was especially sick for the last 18 months of his life.  When he died, the cause was understood to be cancer of some kind.  He was 74 when he died.

On his Utah State death certificate (See photo), the following is recorded by his attending physician as the primary cause of death.  “Carcinoma prostate.  ------ Urine retention,” this likely meaning, prostate cancer overgrown to the level of causing urinary blockage.  Secondary cause of death on the certificate is listed as “----- Dilatatori Heart,” most likely meaning congestive heart failure and edema due to a dilated enlarged heart.

Rich in Children, Retirement, Service for the Lord

Hunter, Salt Lake, Utah

1936 FH-HJW Pioneer Day Covered Wagon Trip on 24th of July apporx 1936.jpg
3 images

One item that was a source of great pride for Henry was how rich he claimed to be with his 21 children.  Of course, the riches that he was referring to were the rich legacy of his family numbers, with numerous children and posterity -- not his financial monetary wealth.  After Henry died in 1930 at the age of 74, and after the start of the Great Depression, work crew men who knew Henry thought of him as having hoards of cash in the bank, due to his claimed family riches.  Although he was not “cash rich,” he was most certainly rich in a very special way, more valuable to him than money itself.  This story is told by his son, Earl Franklin Walk, who passed away on 24 Aug 2007, at age 91.  Earl’s memories of his father Henry appear at the end of this record.

When Henry’s second wife Lydia came to Hunter to live, the people made her feel very welcome, and she made friends with everyone she met.  When the Church organized a program called "Religion Class", Lydia was called to be president in the Hunter Ward, with Mary Rolfe and Bertha Wilkins as councilors, with Beth Evans as Secretary.  Lydia held that position until the church seminary program was organized and brought to the High School.

Lydia was called by the Relief Society of the Ward to be a "Sunshine Lady," a position she particularly enjoyed.  She and Sister Annie Peterson were assigned to visit the ladies in the ward who were shut-in due to illness or some other cause preventing their attendance at church Relief Society meetings.  The two ladies really enjoyed their special calling to bring optimism, hope, and sunshine into the lives of the sisterhood during their hours of distress.

 

One story told about Henry was about a special chair that he sat in, that the children called “Dad's chair.”  It was a chair with a pillow in it, a comfortable back on it, and an arm that came along the front of it.  The arms were circular and the children would sit around the chair while Henry read from the Bible or the Book of Mormon.  Sometimes there would be snacks, with a favorite treat being a coconut to eat after the scripture reading session and prayers were complete.

One of the memorable events that is held every year in Utah to remember men such as Henry Joseph Walk, is the annual Pioneer Day celebration held every 24th of July.  In the 1880s and 1890s, covered wagons and horse drawn carriages were still in regular use as modes of transportation.  In this story of Henry, there are 3 or 4 pictures where such conveyances appear, to include outside the Brighton Flats Walk family home, the Globe Bakery delivery truck, and in front of the ZCMI department store where Henry worked. 

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