Summary

Conflict Period:
World War II 1
Branch:
Marine Corps 1
Rank:
Sergeant 1
Birth:
28 Nov 1921 2
Death:
08 Sep 2010 2
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Personal Details

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Full Name:
Allen Dale June 2
Birth:
28 Nov 1921 2
Death:
08 Sep 2010 2
Residence:
Last Residence: Longmont, CO 2
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World War II 1

Branch:
Marine Corps 1
Rank:
Sergeant 1
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Social Security:
Card Issued: Arizona 2

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WWII Sgt A D June, Navajo Code Talker, WWII

Window Rock, AZ

Sgt Allen Dale (R) with his wife Virginia, May, 2009 at the Cattleman's, Prescott az
2 images

NATIVE AMERICAN; Navajo Code Talker, Sgt Allen Dale June; US Marine.

Allen Dale June and Navajo Code Talkers Received Congressional Gold Medal in 2001

WINDOW ROCK, Ariz. - Allen Dale June, one of the 29 original Navajo Code Talkers who confounded the Japanese during World War II by transmitting messages in their native language, has died. He was 91.

June died of natural causes Wednesday night at the Veteran Assistance Hospital in Prescott, his wife, Virginia, told The Associated Press on Thursday. (19 Sept.2010)

Allen Dale June (November 28, 1921 – September 8, 2010) was an American veteran of World War II. June was one of the 29 original Navajo code talkers who served in the United States Marine Corps during the war.

June was born in Kaibito, Arizona on November 28, 1921, to a Navajo family. His mother was Kin?ichíi?nii, born for T??ízí?ání, and his father was named Yé?ii Dine?é, born for Tachíi?nii.   June graduated from Tuba City Vocational High School in Tuba City in 1941.   Once the United States entered World War II later that year and began recruiting Navajos as code talkers, June hitchhiked to Fort Defiance and Fort Wingate to enlist.

June enlisted in 1941 and became one of the 29 original Navajo code talkers in the U.S. Marines....... he served until the end of World War II in 1945, when he was honorably discharged with the rank of sergeant.

WINDOW ROCK, Ariz. — Allen Dale June, one of the 29 original Navajo Code Talkers who confounded the Japanese during World War II by transmitting messages in their native language, has died. He was 91.

June died of natural causes Wednesday night at a veterans hospital in Prescott, his wife, Virginia, told The Associated Press on Thursday.

His health had been failing since earlier this year when he was hospitalized for a urinary tract infection and kidney failure because he wasn't drinking enough water, his wife said. He was hospitalized again two months ago after visiting family on the Navajo Nation and was transferred from a Flagstaff hospital to Prescott, where he was under round-the-clock care.

The Code Talkers took part in every assault the Marines conducted in the Pacific from 1942 to 1945. They sent thousands of messages without error on Japanese troop movements, battlefield tactics and other communications critical to the war's ultimate outcome.

Several hundred Navajos served as Code Talkers during the war, but a group of 29 that included June developed the code based on their native language. Their role in the war wasn't declassified until 1968.

June, who attained the rank of sergeant, received the Congressional Gold Medal in 2001 along with other members of the original Code Talkers.

"The Navajo Nation lost a great warrior," Tribal Council Speaker Lawrence T. Morgan said in a statement. "His unique service to his country brought positive attention to the Navajo Nation. He will be missed."

June first tried to sign up for the Marines in his hometown of Kaibeto on the Navajo Nation, but a recruiter told him he was too young. He then traveled to the reservation town of Chinle to enlist — because he figured people there wouldn't recognize him — and he could lie about his age and forge his father's signature, Virginia June said.

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      1. Even after the code was declassified in 1968, June said little about his role as a Code Talker because he viewed it as bragging, his wife said. Anyone who saw him in the past several years might have been able to guess he was a Code Talker, as he wore a red Navajo Code Talker cap with his name on it wherever he went and a black leather jacket with "Marines" written across the back. He completed his look with a bolo tie that had a large turquoise stone.

Virginia June routinely handed out cards bearing Allen June's picture and rank in the Marines that he had autographed.

Besides his wife, Allen June is survived by 10 children. Funeral services are scheduled for Monday in Page, with burial in Kaibeto.

Cattleman's Steakhouse Bar and Grill

Prescott, AZ

Chuck Robert's;

Cattlemans Steakhouse Bar and Grill

669 E. Sheldon St., Prescott,AZ,86301

The Cattlemans Bar and Grill was originally established in 1910 as the Santa Fe Bar. The Saloon stood close to the Santa Fe Depot near North Cortez and Sheldon Streets. The weary passengers would leave the trains and "cool their heels" at the bar, and stay at the next door Bucky O' Neil's Hotel. Through the years things changed at the Santa Fe Bar, including during prohibition. It was then called the Santa Fe Buffet, which served food instead of alcohol. Though from old photos, it certainly looks like you could have sneaked a drink. The Santa Fe changed hands through the years, changing names and owners along the way. In the 1950's it was known as the "Esquire". Eventually becoming the Cattleman's in the 1960's. In 1984, local businessman  ***  Chuck Roberts  *** bought the beloved watering hole, and started its major transformation into a steakhouse. Over the next few years, he started to make the place more "respectable" and to offer outstanding food. As years went by, it became known for its excellent steaks, and its down-home service and bar staff. It stayed a hole in the wall, a place favored by locals, and history seeking tourists. In October of 2001 it was time to leave the historic building and relocate to a bigger place of business at 669 E. Sheldon St. After 26 years of business owner Chuck Roberts, and son Chef/Manager Scott Roberts have turned a small hole in the wall business into a staple in Prescott dining. If you ask most locals, The Cattlemans is the place to have a great steak.

Personally, This is the BEST place to find the most tender and delicious, well presented steak!  Then the Menu just gets better from there :)  I rate it a 10!  Barbi Ennis Connolly WWII Historical Resrarcher and Historian for the 319th and 321st Bomb Groups in the 57th Bomb Wing, B-25 Mitchells in the MTO.

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