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Birth:
27 Dec 1904 1
Death:
10 May 2014 1
Corsica, France 1
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Chapin, Carolyn
Chapin, Carolyn
Red Cross Carolyn Chapin (Died Non Battle) 10 May, 1944 Courier Flight/Bad Weather
Red Cross Carolyn Chapin (Died Non Battle) 10 May, 1944 Courier Flight/Bad Weather
Carolyn Chapin's Family, a Neice and Nephew accept her grave marker.
Carolyn Chapin's Family, a Neice and Nephew accept her grave marker.
321stBG,447thVS Ed Ennis with his Combat Ship/Deathwind/Carolyn's Courier Ship
321stBG,447thVS Ed Ennis with his Combat Ship/Deathwind/Carolyn's Courier Ship
Deathwind was a Combat Veteran and still flying Missions only days before, she was "available" that sad day. The Crash and Loss was due to extremely bad weather. 321stBomb Group, 447th Bomb Squad B-25 #42-53371 T/Sgt Edward Ennis *main* Combat Ship /ENNIS PHOTO (Barbi Ennis Connolly)
Carolyn was a RED CROSS Correspondent on her way to a NEW assignment in France.
Carolyn was a RED CROSS Correspondent on her way to a NEW assignment in France.
321stBG,447thBS, Capt Jim Bugbee with his "Deathwind" / BUGBEE PHOTO
321stBG,447thBS, Capt Jim Bugbee with his "Deathwind" / BUGBEE PHOTO
Capt James Bugbee with the B-25 "Deathwind" shared ship with Capt Bob Spikes, also 'main ship' of T/Sgt Edward C Ennis, Airborne RADAR/Aerial Gunner/RADIO. Deathwind flew Combat only days before this tragic accident caused by Bad-Weather. (J BUGBEE Photo)
Carolyn Chapin, Red Cross Worker, Died-non-battle/Courier Flight, 10 May.'44
Carolyn Chapin, Red Cross Worker, Died-non-battle/Courier Flight, 10 May.'44
Carolyn Chapin, Red Cross Worker, Died-non-battle/Courier Flight, 10 May.'44 /The ship he "hopped" a ride in was in the 57th Bomb Wing, Entire story in one of the 57th Books. -B
Memorial Plaque on Corsica, Remembering the Lost-Crew and Passengers.
Memorial Plaque on Corsica, Remembering the Lost-Crew and Passengers.
Corsican Memorial Plaque/Ceremony for the entire CREW loss 10 May'44
Corsican Memorial Plaque/Ceremony for the entire CREW loss 10 May'44
Carolyn Chapins Plaque given to her Niece and Nephew/ 2009
Carolyn Chapins Plaque given to her Niece and Nephew/ 2009
Monument on Corsica for the Ship Loss 10 May, 1944/Top of mountain
Monument on Corsica for the Ship Loss 10 May, 1944/Top of mountain
Carolyn Chapin with the Crew of B-25 #42-53371 Crash on Mountain top.
Carolyn Chapin with the Crew of B-25 #42-53371 Crash on Mountain top.

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Personal Details

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Person:
Carolyn Chapin 2
Age in 1920: 15 2
Birth:
27 Dec 1904 1
Female 1
Birth:
Estimated Birth Year: 1905 2
Death:
10 May 2014 1
Corsica, France 1
Cause: B-25 Courier Ship Loss 1
Residence:
Place: WESTCHESTER County, New York 2
From: 1920 2
Enumeration District: Mount Vernon; Ward 5 2
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Birth:
Mother: Carolyn 1
Father: George F 1

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Carolyn Chapin, DNB Red Cross Correspondent

Corsica

Carolyn Chapins Plaque given to her Niece and Nephew/ 2009
3 images

Carolyn Chapin was born Dec. 27, 1904 to George F (b. 1875) and Carolyn Chapin (b. 1878)  Daughter Carolyn was born in NY and then followed her brother, Farnsworth (b. 1909)

17 Sept.2010 to Barbi Ennis Connolly, FROM Carolyn's Nephew, Bruce Chapin.

Carolyn Chapin volunteered as an American Red Cross Correspondent in 1942 - she wrote articles for the Red Cross about what ARC life overseas during the war was about. She had served in North Africa for a year before being transferred to the European Theater and was hitching a ride from the west side of Corsica to the east - that is how she ended up aboard "Deathwind" with Lt Fletcher, S/Sgt Elliot, Cpl Loring and Capt Geerlings that day. She died before I was born and as I was growing up I only knew of her through a single photograph we had of her hanging in the front hall. Before the war, Carolyn was an overseas buyer for Macy's & Co and had been to North Africa, the East Indies, the Orient and Europe many times. She was fluent in French which I assume helped her land the job of correspondent when she volunteered for service. 


My sister and I are the only surviving relatives. When I was informed by the US Dept of State in 2005 that an expedition had been mounted and the Joint POW/MIA Accountability Command (JPAC) was looking for relatives for mtDNA, I was thrilled to hear the news. While our DNA was not directly useful, it did help JPAC  separate out the others, so we were pleased to help. Her known remains now lie with her parents in Woodbury, CT. The American Red Cross provided a memorial marker for her foot-stone and the American Red Cross Overseas Association (ARCOA) gave a tributary memorial service at the American Red Cross National HQ located next to the White House in Washington, DC last September complete with a large contingent of ARC volunteers who had served in WWII as well. Since this all surfaced, I have learned much more about my aunt; it would have been really nice had my dad live long enough to hear the news, but he passed on in 1998, before the Dept of State could locate us.  (More to come :)  Barbi

Carolyn Chapin

Conn.

By Jonathan Aiken

Friday, September 25, 2009 — Carolyn Chapin has a simple but peaceful view. There’s a small country lane, and behind that, a field of green pasture followed by a line of maples and oaks that are a lush green.

The August air in Woodbury, Connecticut is hot and humid, the sky is November grey.  It’s Monday, the 10th of August. A few relatives and a minister from the small Episcopal Church are gathered around a small dark box, and a freshly dug hole.

Carolyn Chapin’s remains have come home to her parents, ending a long journey that began more than 65 years earlier when the B-25 military plane the Red Cross staffer was on crashed into a barren mountain in Italy.  She’s being buried between her mother and father in the family plot in a Revolutionary War-era cemetery adjacent to a white clapboard church that dates back to 1740.

This story of her homecoming begins in 1942, when records indicate Carolyn Chapin joined the American Red Cross as a correspondent in the Communications Department.  Her job was to bring the war, and the role of the Red Cross in it, home to readers of Red Cross-published magazines. Her assignment: tell the story of U.S. forces fighting to liberate North Africa from the Nazis.

She was already well acquainted with travel. “Carolyn worked for Macy’s as a home furnishings buyer in Europe,” said Bruce Chapin, her nephew. “She had already been through Africa, India and I think she got as far east as Shanghai.  She was a traveler.  Her reporting for Red Cross was an extension of that and a good fit for her.”

In 1943, when Carolyn Chapin was making her way to Algiers, Algeria, the sound bite had yet to be invented, television was still flickering in the lab and the only instant messaging going on was on the comic page, on Dick Tracy’s wristwatch.

Back then, Red Cross used a variety of magazines as one way to reach potential donors.  They went out regularly to subscribers who joined Red Cross and paid annual membership dues.

“Those early Red Cross publications provided detailed information regarding the organization’s activities at home and abroad.” noted Susan R. Watson, Chief Archivist at the Red Cross. “Before the era of TV and now the internet, they were a primary vehicle for communication and promotion”.

It was Carolyn Chapin’s job to show how Red Cross Service Clubs and mobile, front-line canteens brought small touches of home to GI Joes across North Africa, making a big difference in the lives of men and women who were far from wherever they really wanted to be.

In one of her early stories, dated April 1943, she wrote about the transformation of an empty school building in Algiers into a Service Club for GI’s and how necessity was the mother of invention for Red Cross workers trying to outfit a club with virtually no raw materials to work with:

“The Americans put on their thinking caps (non-rationed) and bought native pottery bowls for coffee cups…salvaged the wood from packing crates in which their own supplies had come…and gave it to local carpenters to make desks, lamp bases, file trays, supply cabinets, knobby coat racks and double-decker beds for the club dormitory.”

Carolyn’s stories for Red Cross covered a wide range. She wrote of the experiences of 18 female American field hospital workers in Benghazi, a coastal town in Libya, the only American women within 200 miles. She also compiled a collection of factoids for an NBC Radio story showing American soldiers fighting in the Mediterranean theater were a hungry bunch, consuming 25.2 million doughnuts by September 1943.  

On May 10, 1944, Carolyn Chapin was out of Africa and bound for Naples.  On the island of Corsica off the Italian coast, she boarded a B-25, joining four Army personnel to hitch a ride on what was supposed to be a 30-minute, cross-island mail run. The weather was soup and in the fog, the plane crashed into a barren mountainside and exploded. No one survived.

Army and Red Cross reports at the time suggested no remains could be recovered. Few personal effects were found – but one of them was a woman’s shoe.

Some 4,000 feet up Mt. Cagna, Carolyn Chapin and her travelling companions were in what seemed to be their final resting place: a craggy mountain slope filled with house-sized boulders and huge crevices.

Fast-forward to May 1989: A Corsican villager, who witnessed the 1944 crash as a young boy, tells authorities he saw local residents bury the dead in some of the towering crevices that streak the mountain.

The Corsicans recovered the remains, along with some personal effects and plane parts. Later, U.S. recovery teams also searched the mountain, and sent what they found to the U.S. Central Identification Labs at Hickam Air Force Base in Hawaii.  That’s where the Joint POW/MIA Accounting Command (JPAC) spent years analyzing the remains, using methods that ranged from DNA samples taken from living relatives, to a process of elimination to conclude the single woman on board that aircraft was Carolyn Chapin, correspondent, American Red Cross.

“These are the folks who actually ascended the mountain and dug stuff out – and sifted sands and did all the hard work, just to do what they could to bring someone home,” Bruce Chapin noted.

The State Department has an office that handles unidentified cold cases, POWs, MIAs and Americans who just wander into places they shouldn’t. A call in September 2005 from that office seeking Carolyn’s relatives to confirm her identity caught Bruce Chapin by surprise.  

“There’s a name I hadn’t heard in a long time. I had been thinking about my aunt before this…so it was serendipity that here’s a call out of the blue that there’s another group of people wanting to find her.  I thought: Wow, that’s great!” Chapin said.

Between the more than three years from the time the State Department called, until he received a letter in March 2009 formally identifying his Aunt Carolyn’s remains, Bruce Chapin began to research his aunt’s story.  He turned to Red Cross Archivist Susan Watson, who provided him with photographs, service records and copies of the stories she wrote.

That history helped bring Carolyn Chapin to life for two relatives: niece Cindy, who was just a few months old at the time, and Bruce, a nephew she never knew she had. Bruce was born after his aunt was killed.  

“What Susan and others at Red Cross were able to dig up and provide to us gave me a chance to hear Carol’s voice, which I had never heard before,” Bruce Chapin said. “I now have things about Carol that I can pass along to next generations of our family – it’s part of the family record now. We lost a lot, and now we’ve been able to recover some of that.”

At the family’s request, the State Department contacted Red Cross national headquarters in Washington, D.C., and asked for assistance in bringing Carolyn Chapin’s remains home.  She was laid to rest with her parents in St. Paul’s Episcopal Church Cemetery in Woodbury on August 10.

For Bruce Chapin, his sister Cindy and generations of the Chapin family yet to come, the effort to find Carolyn’s story and bring her home to her parents brought to life a missing part of their family’s history and their aunt’s service.

“All we had before was this picture on a wall, that was it, just a picture on the wall” he said. “Now, I have a much better picture of who my aunt was that I never had before, and for that I am eternally grateful.”

In the will she wrote in the summer of 1942, about six months before she left Washington for Algeria, Carolyn Chapin wrote: “I have little to leave you all but love.”

Now however, the Chapin family has its memories, her parents are forever re-united with their daughter, and Carolyn Chapin has both the recognition and the gratitude of the American Red Cross.

 About the American Red Cross:
The American Red Cross shelters, feeds and provides emotional support to victims of disasters; supplies nearly half of the nation's blood; teaches lifesaving skills; provides international humanitarian aid; and supports military members and their families. The Red Cross is a charitable organization — not a government agency — and depends on volunteers and the generosity of the American public to perform its mission. For more information, please visit www.redcross.org or join our blog at http://blog.redcross.org.

Carolyn Chapin

Conn,

Carole was a Red Cross Worker and was on the Courier Ship when it crashed into the mountains of Corsica during bad weather, 10 May, 1944.

Carole Chapin, Red Cross Honoree (USN) 

By Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Timothy Wilson, National Naval Medical Center Public Affairs

BETHESDA, Md. (NNS) -- The American Red Cross Overseas Association honored volunteers Sep. 25 during the group's 50th memorial ceremony at their national headquarters in D.C.

Every year since 1959, the American Red Cross (ARC) has conducted a ceremony to pay tribute to those serving overseas and who have lost their lives in service of the ARC.

During the ceremony, special honors were paid to Carolyn Chapin, who died in 1944 and whose remains were only recently identified. During World War II, she was a war correspondent for the communications department of the Red Cross and her job was to detail the actions of the ARC, bringing the war home to readers.

She wrote extensively about the lives of U.S. Soldiers while stationed in Northern Africa beginning in 1943. However, on May 10, 1944, she boarded a B-25 mail plane set to leave Africa for the island of Corsica with four other Army personnel. Due to severe weather, the plane crashed into a mountainside and the explosion left no survivors.

"[Authorities] recovered the body and the Red Cross was instrumental in bringing her home," said Wade Walrond, senior program director for the Red Cross at Walter Reed Army Medical Center. "Just like the military, we are not going to leave people behind."

Members of the ARC are exposed to dangerous situations in war zones and when they do go in harm's way, it is very important that they not be forgotten, Walrond said.

During the ceremony, written works from former ARC volunteers who served from WWII to Vietnam, were read aloud describing dangers faced during their time abroad, Walrond said.

"Theirs were different wars, but it was the same feelings," Walrond said.

"What most people don't know is the close relationship the Red Cross has with the military," said Ingrid Torres, ARC station manager at the National Naval Medical Center.

Torres has worked with the military at ARC stations in Japan, the Republic of Korea, Iraq and Germany before she came to NNMC.

The ARC has a long history and tradition of serving members of the U.S. Armed Forces, veterans and their families and it's this service to the Armed Forces that makes up the cornerstone on which the ARC was founded, Torres said. The first responsibility of the ARC is to ensure service members and their families can stay in touch with each other, Torres said.

Red Cross Emergency Communication Network provides a vital service where the ARC can quickly and confidentially exchange information between family members. In 2008, the ARC helped approximately 500 families each day through various communication and financial networks found throughout the world. When possible, the ARC will connect with local community resources to help families in anyway possible.

When workers are not delivering emergency messages, the deployed Red Cross workers help keep up the morale of our troops by providing a place where they can see a friendly face or take some time to relax, Torres said.

It is important to help families understand their loved ones will be provided for while they are on deployment, Torres said. Around the clock, each day of the year, the ARC provides assistance to those in need and many families who don't expect prolonged and repeated deployments.

Coping with Deployments: Psychological First Aid for Military Families is a new class that will be offered at NNMC in November for all staff, patients and their families.

The course will help families manage the many changes in their lives when a loved one is deployed by giving useful information about the day-to-day challenges and how to navigate through them, Torres said. In addition, the course teaches methods of combating stress and handling unexpected events.

The ARC acts on-behalf of the American public to serve service members who have decided to serve their country, she said.

"The Red Cross helps those service members stay focused on their mission," Torres said.

Red Cross employees and volunteers have been serving overseas since 1892 and currently have 170 workers serving overseas from Afghanistan to Tanzania.

PRINCESSBARBI_B25@msn.com 57thBW Researcher/321stBG Hisrorian  This ship was my Dad/Edward C Ennis' main Combat Ship, Ed finished his tour and went home early in March, 1944.  The Courier Crash was the result of bad weather. "Deathwind" was to be the Pilot/Ray Fletcher's Ship, Deathwind was flying Combat Missions up to a few days before, she was "available" that day.   (Originally Created 25 April, 2010)

Carolyn Chapin Brought HOME !

Conn.

321stBG,447thVS Ed Ennis with his Combat Ship/Deathwind/Carolyn's Courier Ship
6 images

Carolyn;  #1

Red Cross Honors Those Who Served Overseas

Friday, September 25, 2009 —

The American Red Cross Overseas Association (ARCOA) honored one of their own, the late Carolyn Chapin, during its 50th memorial ceremony at national headquarters in Washington, D.C. 

Miss Chapin died in 1944 while serving with the Red Cross in northern Africa (see accompanying story).  Her remains were identified earlier this year.  With the assistance of the U.S. State Department, the Red Cross helped return her remains to Woodbury, Connecticut for burial this summer.  A special Red Cross grave marker was accepted by Carolyn’s niece and nephew, Lucinda Merrill and Bruce Chapin.

The ARCOA memorial ceremony is held every year to pay tribute to Red Crossers who have served overseas.  Also honored are those who lost their lives while serving with the Red Cross.  Nearly 500 Red Cross employees and volunteers died in service during wars in the 20th century, including 70 men and 330 women during World War I.

In attendance were ARCOA members, including several who served during WWII.  ARCOA President Anita Wright presided over the ceremony.  Red Cross Humanitarian Services President Jerry DeFrancisco welcomed those in attendance.  James Thomas and the Red Cross Chorus performed.  The Armed Forces Color Guard, Military District of Washington, retired the Colors, and SSGT Michael Warnick of the President’s U.S. Marine Band sounded Taps.

ARCOA was founded in 1949 in Cleveland, Ohio, by World War II overseas Red Cross workers.  Members include men and women who have served with the Red Cross overseas, during war and peacetime, in locations around the world. 

Red Cross employees and volunteers have been serving overseas since 1892 when founder Clara Barton sent the first field worker, Dr. Julian Hubbell, to supervise the relief operation for the Russian famine. 

Today, there are 170 Red Crossers serving overseas, everywhere from Afghanistan to Tanzania.  Our staff overseas work on military installations and alongside our troops in the Middle East, providing emergency communications between service members and their families back home.  They respond to international disasters, and educate people on disease prevention and disaster preparedness.

Created by you 25 Apr 2010

Carolyn Chapin

Arlington Cemetery, Washington DC

Red Cross Staff Member Lost in World War II Plane Crash. Red Cross Staff Member Lost in World War II Plane Crash

By Roger Lowe and Jonathan Aiken

Thursday, March 03, 2011 — Nearly 67 years after their B-25 military plane was lost in a crash on a barren mountain in Italy, five people who served their country in World War II will be honored at a ceremony at Arlington National Cemetery, with their remains buried in a joint grave at the storied cemetery.

Four of those crash victims being honored in the Old Post Chapel at the historic national cemetery are U.S. Army personnel, and the fifth is an American Red Cross staff member, Carolyn Chapin.

Chapin, a correspondent who had joined the Red Cross Communications Department in 1942, was assigned cover the war, and the role of the Red Cross in it, for readers of Red Cross-published magazines that were sent to subscribers who joined the Red Cross and paid annual membership dues.  

“Carolyn Chapin, like many of the women who served with the American Red Cross during World War II; was courageous, compassionate and patriotic, said Jerry DeFrancisco, president, Humanitarian Services for the Red Cross. “What makes her unique is that she left a body of work as a Red Cross Correspondent that showed the unique role Red Cross played in the lives of the men and women who fought that war. We are proud of her, and pleased to see that she is being honored with the others who lost their lives that day.”   

Chapin was sent in 1943 to Algiers, Algeria, to tell the story of U.S. forces fighting to liberate North Africa from the Nazis – and to show how Red Cross Service Clubs and mobile, front-line canteens brought small touches of home to GI Joes across North Africa, making a big difference in the lives of men and women who were far from wherever they really wanted to be.

In one of her early stories, dated April 1943, she wrote about the transformation of an empty school building in Algiers into a Service Club for GI’s and how necessity was the mother of invention for Red Cross workers trying to outfit a club with virtually no raw materials to work with:

“The Americans put on their thinking caps (non-rationed) and bought native pottery bowls for coffee cups…salvaged the wood from packing crates in which their own supplies had come…and gave it to local carpenters to make desks, lamp bases, file trays, supply cabinets, knobby coat racks and double-decker beds for the club dormitory.”

Her stories for Red Cross covered a wide range. She wrote of the experiences of 18 female American field hospital workers in Benghazi, a coastal town in Libya, the only American women within 200 miles. She also compiled factoids for an NBC Radio story showing American soldiers fighting in the Mediterranean theater were a hungry bunch, consuming 25.2 million doughnuts by September 1943.  You can click here to read one of Carolyn's stories.

On May 10, 1944, Carolyn Chapin was out of Africa and bound for Naples.  On the island of Corsica off the Italian coast, she boarded a B-25, joining four Army personnel to hitch a ride on what was supposed to be a 30-minute, cross-island mail run. The weather was soup and in the fog, the plane crashed into a barren mountainside and exploded. No one survived.

Army and Red Cross reports at the time suggested no remains could be recovered. Few personal effects were found – but one of them was a woman’s shoe.

Some 4,000 feet up Mt. Cagna, Carolyn Chapin and her travelling companions were in what seemed to be their final resting place: a craggy mountain slope filled with house-sized boulders and huge crevices.

And that’s the way it stayed for decades, until May 1989. That’s when a Corsican villager, who witnessed the 1944 crash as a young boy, told authorities he saw local residents bury the dead in some of the towering crevices that streak the mountain.

The Corsicans recovered the remains, along with some personal effects and plane parts. Later, U.S. recovery teams also searched the mountain, and sent what they found to the U.S. Central Identification Labs at Hickam Air Force Base in Hawaii.

The Joint POW/MIA Accounting Command (JPAC) spent years analyzing the remains, using methods that ranged from DNA samples taken from living relatives, to a process of elimination to conclude the single woman on board that aircraft was Chapin.

The State Department has an office that handles unidentified cold cases, and in September 2005, a call seeking Carolyn’s relatives to confirm her identity surprised Bruce Chapin, her nephew.  

Between the more than three years from the time the State Department called, until he received a letter in March 2009 formally identifying his Aunt Carolyn’s remains, Bruce Chapin began to research his aunt’s story.  He turned to Susan Watson, the Red Cross Archivist, who provided him with photographs, service records and copies of the stories his aunt had written.

That history helped bring Carolyn Chapin to life for two relatives: niece Cindy, who was just a few months old at the time, and Bruce, a nephew born after his aunt was killed.  

Carolyn's family had her final correspondence from her in the summer of 1942, before she left Washington for Algeria: “I have little to leave you all, but love.”

“What Susan and others at Red Cross were able to dig up and provide to us gave me a chance to hear Carol’s voice, which I had never heard before,” Bruce Chapin said. “I now have things about Carol that I can pass along to next generations of our family – it’s part of the family record now. We lost a lot, and now we’ve been able to recover some of that.”

At the family’s request, the State Department contacted Red Cross national headquarters in Washington, D.C., and asked for assistance in bringing Carolyn Chapin’s remains home, and she was laid to rest with her parents in St. Paul’s Episcopal Church Cemetery in Woodbury on August 10, 2009. This week, she is also being honored and included in the joint grave with the others on that lost plane at Arlington National Cemetery.

 

About the American Red Cross:
The American Red Cross shelters, feeds and provides emotional support to victims of disasters; supplies nearly half of the nation's blood; teaches lifesaving skills; provides international humanitarian aid; and supports military members and their families. The Red Cross is a charitable organization — not a government agency — and depends on volunteers and the generosity of the American public to perform its mission. For more information, please visit www.redcross.org or join our blog at http://blog.redcross.org.

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