Summary

Birth:
16 Sep 1820 1
Franklin, Heard, Georgia 1
Death:
14 Aug 1863 1
Dallas, Texas 1
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Also known as:
TC Hawpe 1
Also known as:
Colonel T C Hawpe 1
Birth:
16 Sep 1820 1
Franklin, Heard, Georgia 1
Male 1
Death:
14 Aug 1863 1
Dallas, Texas 1
Burial:
Burial Place: Masonic Cemtery (Pioneer Cemetery), Dallas, Texas 1
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Birth:
Mother: Mary Catherine Campbell 1
Father: George W Hawpe 1

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Trezevant Calhoun Hawpe

 

"TREZEVANT CALHOUN HAWPE"
(1821-1863)

Trezevant C. Hawpe, farmer, Confederate officer, and politician, son of George Hawpe, was born on September 16, 1820, in Georgia. As a young man he moved to Tennessee, where he met and married his first wife. In 1845 they moved to Dallas County, Texas. Shortly after their arrival Mrs. Hawpe died, and on May 31, 1848, Hawpe married Electa Ann Underwood Bethurum, a widow from New York. Hawpe had one son by his first wife and seven children by his second. He was elected sheriff of Dallas County in 1850 and 1852. He served as justice of the peace for Precinct 1 from 1854 to 1856 and was then elected county coroner. In August 1859 he was secretary of a citizens' meeting convened to expel from Dallas Solomon McKinney, a minister and suspected abolitionist. In 1860 Hawpe was one of the organizers of a county convention called to elect delegates to the state Secession Convention.qv By 1860, in addition to his political activities, he had a large farm, raised thoroughbred horses, and was a partner in a steam flour mill and an agent for several farm-implement companies. With total taxable property worth over $20,000, Hawpe was one of the wealthiest individuals in Dallas County. He was also an organizer of the Dallas County Agricultural and Mechanical Association and a member of Tannehill Lodge, the county's first Masonic body.

In early 1862 Hawpe organized the Thirty-first Texas Cavalry Regiment and was elected its colonel. The regiment served under Gen. Thomas C. Hindman in Indian Territory, Arkansas, and Missouri. It fought in the battle at Newtonia, Missouri, in September 1862. On November 1, 1862, the regiment was dismounted, and on November 21 Hawpe resigned to return to Dallas. By mid-December 1862 he was engaged in hauling supplies to the Confederate forces in Arkansas and Indian Territory. He served as a trustee for Dallas Male and Female Collegeqv in 1863. Hawpe was killed in Dallas on August 14, 1863, as a result of a quarrel and was buried in the Masonic Cemetery there.

BIBLIOGRAPHY: Alwyn Barr, Polignac's Texas Brigade, Texas Gulf Coast Historical Association Publication Series 8.1 (November 1964). Memorial and Biographical History of Dallas County (Chicago: Lewis, 1892; rpt., Dallas: Walsworth, 1976).

Provided by: Gary R. Hawpe

 

T C Hawpe

IN MEMORIAM

We are sadly pained to announce the death of our friend and fellow citizen,
Col. T. C. Hawpe. He fell in an unfortunate encounter at this place last Friday evening, the particulars of which it is not necessary here to state.

He was one of our oldest and most enterprising citizens, a man of great energy and determination of character, imbued thoroughly with the spirit of the times and devoted to the good of the country, as well as the interests of his immediate section. This deplorable event has cast a gloom over the community, and his death is deeply lamented as a loss to the country, at a time when the services of all her people are needed. As Colonel of the Regiment which he raised 18 months ago, he was popular and much beloved; he behaved with gallantry at the battle of Newtonia and in other engagements in Missouri and Arkansas. But he is gone from the scenes of glory and of usefulness – his distressed family, - his devoted sister, wife and children, while they mourn his unexpected death will long cherish his tenderness and devotion, his warm affection and loving heart; their memory will live with them as one of the treasures of after life, of which none can rob them!

He was buried at the Masonic Cemetery with the honors of that Order, a vast concourse of friends and acquaintances accompanying his remains to their last resting place.

Col. T. C. Hawpe was born 16th September, 1821, in the state of Georgia. He afterwards lived in Tennessee and Kentucky, and immigrated to Texas in 1846, shared and endured the hardships of the Texas pioneers and by industry and perseverance accumulated a goodly share of this world’s goods. He died Aug. 14th, 1863, leaving a wife and seven children, an affectionate sister and a brother, all citizens of this county.

The Dallas Herald -- Dallas, Dallas County, Texas -- August 19, 1863 -- Wednesday.

Provided by: Dwayne A. Hawpe

T C Hawpe

Trezevant Calhoun Hawpe (b. 16 September 1820, Franklin, Heard County, Georgia d. 12 August 1863, Dallas, Dallas County, Texas) became the first four-year sheriff in 1850, and had a new wood jail built to exacting specifications (16 by 16 foot cedar log structure, its outside walls were eight inches thick with one door, three and one half feet wide and five feet high, it had one window covered with slab iron bars). A widower, he moved from Tennessee to Dallas County with his son in 1845. He had arrived in 1846 and lived in the East Dallas area. He married Electa Ann Underwood Bethurum on 31 May 1848. He was elected sheriff of Dallas County in 1850 and re-elected on 2 August 1852. Following his election, he deputized John P Cole on 28 October 1850, Adam Carver Haught (who would succeed him as Sheriff) on 25 March 1851, E. C. McKenzie on 22 July 1853 and James Horton on 13 February 1854. Hawpe supervised the first hanging in Dallas County in 1853, a black woman, named Jane, who had killed a widower, named Wisdom, by splitting his head with an ax while he was sleeping in bed with his two little children. Jane was hired to keep house and take care of the children. He served as Justice of the Peace for Precinct 1, Place 2 from 1853 to 1856 and was then elected county Coroner. 

In August 1859 he was secretary of a citizens' meeting convened to expel from Dallas Solomon McKinney, a minister and suspected abolitionist. In 1860 Hawpe was one of the organizers of a county convention called to elect delegates to the state Secession Convention. By 1860, in addition to his political activities, he had a large farm, raised thoroughbred horses, and was a partner in a steam flour mill and an agent for several farm-implement companies. Hawpe was one of the wealthiest individuals in Dallas County. 

During the Civil War, Hawpe became a Confederate Colonel; he organized and commanded the 31st Texas Cavalry Regiment composed of Dallas County men. The Regiment served under Gen. Thomas C. Hindman in Indian Territory (now Oklahoma), Arkansas, and Missouri. It fought in the battle at Newtonia, Missouri, in September 1862. On November 1, 1862, the regiment was dismounted, and on November 21 Hawpe resigned, due to wounds, and returned to Dallas. By mid-December 1862 he was engaged in hauling supplies to the Confederate forces in Arkansas and Indian Territory. He served as a trustee for Dallas Male and Female College in 1863. He was stabbed “seven or eight times”, on the Courthouse Square, by a man named Daniel Caster, in an argument on 12 August 1863, over the sale of a load of hogs which both had bid for in an auction. He and his wife Electa had eight children. He is buried in Lot 83, Masonic Section, of Dallas Pioneer Cemetery. (Term: 15 August 1850 to 21 August 1854)

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